It Gets Worse Before it Gets Better

Timing of Instructions in Close Human-Robot Collaboration

Lars Christian Jensen, Kerstin Fischer, Franziska Kirstein, Dadhichi Shukla, Özgur Erkent, Justus Piater

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A micro-analysis of the timing of people’s actions in close
human-robot collaborations shows that people expect robots
to attend to interactional achievements in the same way as
humans do; that is, they expect that in a repeated task, the
robot builds on the common ground acquired in the previous
interaction. This expectation is revealed through increased
response times by the human users, which leads to less fluent
interactions; however, users recover over the course of the
next actions, orienting at the principle of least collaborative
effort. The paper thus illustrates a) how a qualitative micro-
analysis provides a methodological tool for uncovering users’
expectations online (in comparison to post hoc by means of
questionnaires, for instance), and b) what exactly it is that
users expect.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Companion of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction
EditorsBilge Mutlu, Manfred Tscheligi, Astrid Weiss, James E. Young
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Publication date2017
Pages145-146
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4503-4885-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventInternational Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2017 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: 6. Mar 20179. Mar 2017

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2017
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period06/03/201709/03/2017

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robot
instruction
time

Keywords

  • timing; contingency; uncanny valley; common ground; human- robot collaboration

Cite this

Jensen, L. C., Fischer, K., Kirstein, F., Shukla, D., Erkent, Ö., & Piater, J. (2017). It Gets Worse Before it Gets Better: Timing of Instructions in Close Human-Robot Collaboration. In B. Mutlu, M. Tscheligi, A. Weiss, & J. E. Young (Eds.), Proceedings of the Companion of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (pp. 145-146). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3029798.3038426
Jensen, Lars Christian ; Fischer, Kerstin ; Kirstein, Franziska ; Shukla, Dadhichi ; Erkent, Özgur ; Piater, Justus. / It Gets Worse Before it Gets Better : Timing of Instructions in Close Human-Robot Collaboration. Proceedings of the Companion of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction. editor / Bilge Mutlu ; Manfred Tscheligi ; Astrid Weiss ; James E. Young. Association for Computing Machinery, 2017. pp. 145-146
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Jensen, LC, Fischer, K, Kirstein, F, Shukla, D, Erkent, Ö & Piater, J 2017, It Gets Worse Before it Gets Better: Timing of Instructions in Close Human-Robot Collaboration. in B Mutlu, M Tscheligi, A Weiss & JE Young (eds), Proceedings of the Companion of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 145-146, International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2017, Vienna, Austria, 06/03/2017. https://doi.org/10.1145/3029798.3038426

It Gets Worse Before it Gets Better : Timing of Instructions in Close Human-Robot Collaboration. / Jensen, Lars Christian; Fischer, Kerstin; Kirstein, Franziska; Shukla, Dadhichi; Erkent, Özgur; Piater, Justus.

Proceedings of the Companion of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction. ed. / Bilge Mutlu; Manfred Tscheligi; Astrid Weiss; James E. Young. Association for Computing Machinery, 2017. p. 145-146.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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Jensen LC, Fischer K, Kirstein F, Shukla D, Erkent Ö, Piater J. It Gets Worse Before it Gets Better: Timing of Instructions in Close Human-Robot Collaboration. In Mutlu B, Tscheligi M, Weiss A, Young JE, editors, Proceedings of the Companion of the 2017 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery. 2017. p. 145-146 https://doi.org/10.1145/3029798.3038426