Is Who you Ask Important? Concordance Between Survey and Registry Data on Medication Use Among Self- and Proxy-Respondents in the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study

Anna Oksuzyan*, Torsten Sauer, Jutta Gampe, Andreas Höhn, Mette Wod, Kaare Christensen, Jonas W Wastesson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: This study investigates the accuracy of the reporting of medication use by proxy- and self-respondents, and it compares the prognostic value of the number of medications from survey and registry data for predicting mortality across self- and proxy-respondents.

Methods: The study is based on the linkage of the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study with the Danish National Prescription Registry. We investigated the concordance between survey and registry data, and the prognostic value of medication use when assessed using survey and registry data, to predict mortality for self- and proxy-respondents at intake surveys.

Results: Among self-respondents, the agreement was moderate (κ = 0.52-0.58) for most therapeutic groups, whereas among proxy-respondents, the agreement was low to moderate (κ = 0.36-0.60). The magnitude of the relative differences was, generally, greater among proxies than among self-respondents. Each additional increase in the total number of medications was associated with 7%-8% mortality increase among self- and 4%-6% mortality increase among proxy-respondents in both the survey and registry data. The predictive value of the total number of medications estimated from either data source was lower among proxies (c-statistic = 0.56-0.58) than among self-respondents (c-statistic = 0.74).

Conclusions: The concordance between survey and registry data regarding medication use and the predictive value of the number of medications for mortality were lower among proxy- than among self-respondents.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Volume74
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)742-747
ISSN1079-5006
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. May 2019

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Proxy
Longitudinal Studies
Registries
Cohort Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Information Storage and Retrieval
Prescriptions

Keywords

  • Denmark
  • Medication use
  • Proxy
  • Register study
  • Self-respondents

Cite this

@article{24f65908440a400ab76f1d27917a6045,
title = "Is Who you Ask Important?: Concordance Between Survey and Registry Data on Medication Use Among Self- and Proxy-Respondents in the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study",
abstract = "Background: This study investigates the accuracy of the reporting of medication use by proxy- and self-respondents, and it compares the prognostic value of the number of medications from survey and registry data for predicting mortality across self- and proxy-respondents.Methods: The study is based on the linkage of the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study with the Danish National Prescription Registry. We investigated the concordance between survey and registry data, and the prognostic value of medication use when assessed using survey and registry data, to predict mortality for self- and proxy-respondents at intake surveys.Results: Among self-respondents, the agreement was moderate (κ = 0.52-0.58) for most therapeutic groups, whereas among proxy-respondents, the agreement was low to moderate (κ = 0.36-0.60). The magnitude of the relative differences was, generally, greater among proxies than among self-respondents. Each additional increase in the total number of medications was associated with 7{\%}-8{\%} mortality increase among self- and 4{\%}-6{\%} mortality increase among proxy-respondents in both the survey and registry data. The predictive value of the total number of medications estimated from either data source was lower among proxies (c-statistic = 0.56-0.58) than among self-respondents (c-statistic = 0.74).Conclusions: The concordance between survey and registry data regarding medication use and the predictive value of the number of medications for mortality were lower among proxy- than among self-respondents.",
keywords = "Denmark, Medication use, Proxy, Register study, Self-respondents",
author = "Anna Oksuzyan and Torsten Sauer and Jutta Gampe and Andreas H{\"o}hn and Mette Wod and Kaare Christensen and Wastesson, {Jonas W}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/gerona/gly104",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "742--747",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "5",

}

Is Who you Ask Important? Concordance Between Survey and Registry Data on Medication Use Among Self- and Proxy-Respondents in the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study. / Oksuzyan, Anna; Sauer, Torsten; Gampe, Jutta; Höhn, Andreas; Wod, Mette; Christensen, Kaare; Wastesson, Jonas W.

In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, Vol. 74, No. 5, 01.05.2019, p. 742-747.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is Who you Ask Important?

T2 - Concordance Between Survey and Registry Data on Medication Use Among Self- and Proxy-Respondents in the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study

AU - Oksuzyan, Anna

AU - Sauer, Torsten

AU - Gampe, Jutta

AU - Höhn, Andreas

AU - Wod, Mette

AU - Christensen, Kaare

AU - Wastesson, Jonas W

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Background: This study investigates the accuracy of the reporting of medication use by proxy- and self-respondents, and it compares the prognostic value of the number of medications from survey and registry data for predicting mortality across self- and proxy-respondents.Methods: The study is based on the linkage of the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study with the Danish National Prescription Registry. We investigated the concordance between survey and registry data, and the prognostic value of medication use when assessed using survey and registry data, to predict mortality for self- and proxy-respondents at intake surveys.Results: Among self-respondents, the agreement was moderate (κ = 0.52-0.58) for most therapeutic groups, whereas among proxy-respondents, the agreement was low to moderate (κ = 0.36-0.60). The magnitude of the relative differences was, generally, greater among proxies than among self-respondents. Each additional increase in the total number of medications was associated with 7%-8% mortality increase among self- and 4%-6% mortality increase among proxy-respondents in both the survey and registry data. The predictive value of the total number of medications estimated from either data source was lower among proxies (c-statistic = 0.56-0.58) than among self-respondents (c-statistic = 0.74).Conclusions: The concordance between survey and registry data regarding medication use and the predictive value of the number of medications for mortality were lower among proxy- than among self-respondents.

AB - Background: This study investigates the accuracy of the reporting of medication use by proxy- and self-respondents, and it compares the prognostic value of the number of medications from survey and registry data for predicting mortality across self- and proxy-respondents.Methods: The study is based on the linkage of the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins and the Danish 1905-Cohort Study with the Danish National Prescription Registry. We investigated the concordance between survey and registry data, and the prognostic value of medication use when assessed using survey and registry data, to predict mortality for self- and proxy-respondents at intake surveys.Results: Among self-respondents, the agreement was moderate (κ = 0.52-0.58) for most therapeutic groups, whereas among proxy-respondents, the agreement was low to moderate (κ = 0.36-0.60). The magnitude of the relative differences was, generally, greater among proxies than among self-respondents. Each additional increase in the total number of medications was associated with 7%-8% mortality increase among self- and 4%-6% mortality increase among proxy-respondents in both the survey and registry data. The predictive value of the total number of medications estimated from either data source was lower among proxies (c-statistic = 0.56-0.58) than among self-respondents (c-statistic = 0.74).Conclusions: The concordance between survey and registry data regarding medication use and the predictive value of the number of medications for mortality were lower among proxy- than among self-respondents.

KW - Denmark

KW - Medication use

KW - Proxy

KW - Register study

KW - Self-respondents

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/gly104

DO - 10.1093/gerona/gly104

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29924318

VL - 74

SP - 742

EP - 747

JO - Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 5

ER -