Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches: Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence

Richard Shefferson, Owen Jones, Roberto Salguero-Gómez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We humans have long wondered about the seemingly inevitable physiological decline that happens after our maturity. This phenomenon, known as ‘senescence’, is recognised as the physiological deterioration that results in increasing age-specific mortality or decreasing age-specific fertility at or beyond some age in maturity. But is this phenomenon universal, and is it always the result of the same processes? Although evolutionary theories of ageing exist that suggest that senescence should be universal, empirical data increasingly suggest that senescence may not necessarily be a ubiquitous feature among multicellular organisms, and where it does occur, it is not clear that it is always the result of the same ultimate or proximate mechanisms. In this contributed book, some of the leading scientists in ageing research offer an in-depth, updated understanding of the mechanisms behind senescence, using cutting-edge approaches and species representing a wide evolutionary diversity of life.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life
EditorsRichard Shefferson, Owen Jones, Roberto Salguero-Gomez
Place of PublicationCambridge, UK
PublisherCambridge University Press
Publication date2017
Pages1-20
Chapter1
ISBN (Print)978-1107078505
ISBN (Electronic)9781139939867
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

maturity
evolutionary theory
fertility
mortality

Cite this

Shefferson, R., Jones, O., & Salguero-Gómez, R. (2017). Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches: Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence. In R. Shefferson, O. Jones, & R. Salguero-Gomez (Eds.), The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life (pp. 1-20). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139939867.001
Shefferson, Richard ; Jones, Owen ; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto. / Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches : Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence. The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. editor / Richard Shefferson ; Owen Jones ; Roberto Salguero-Gomez. Cambridge, UK : Cambridge University Press, 2017. pp. 1-20
@inbook{558a00b664304e4bb3b6045402e780b1,
title = "Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches: Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence",
abstract = "We humans have long wondered about the seemingly inevitable physiological decline that happens after our maturity. This phenomenon, known as ‘senescence’, is recognised as the physiological deterioration that results in increasing age-specific mortality or decreasing age-specific fertility at or beyond some age in maturity. But is this phenomenon universal, and is it always the result of the same processes? Although evolutionary theories of ageing exist that suggest that senescence should be universal, empirical data increasingly suggest that senescence may not necessarily be a ubiquitous feature among multicellular organisms, and where it does occur, it is not clear that it is always the result of the same ultimate or proximate mechanisms. In this contributed book, some of the leading scientists in ageing research offer an in-depth, updated understanding of the mechanisms behind senescence, using cutting-edge approaches and species representing a wide evolutionary diversity of life.",
author = "Richard Shefferson and Owen Jones and Roberto Salguero-G{\'o}mez",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1017/9781139939867.001",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1107078505",
pages = "1--20",
editor = "Richard Shefferson and Owen Jones and Roberto Salguero-Gomez",
booktitle = "The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

Shefferson, R, Jones, O & Salguero-Gómez, R 2017, Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches: Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence. in R Shefferson, O Jones & R Salguero-Gomez (eds), The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139939867.001

Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches : Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence. / Shefferson, Richard; Jones, Owen; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto.

The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. ed. / Richard Shefferson; Owen Jones; Roberto Salguero-Gomez. Cambridge, UK : Cambridge University Press, 2017. p. 1-20.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches

T2 - Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence

AU - Shefferson, Richard

AU - Jones, Owen

AU - Salguero-Gómez, Roberto

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - We humans have long wondered about the seemingly inevitable physiological decline that happens after our maturity. This phenomenon, known as ‘senescence’, is recognised as the physiological deterioration that results in increasing age-specific mortality or decreasing age-specific fertility at or beyond some age in maturity. But is this phenomenon universal, and is it always the result of the same processes? Although evolutionary theories of ageing exist that suggest that senescence should be universal, empirical data increasingly suggest that senescence may not necessarily be a ubiquitous feature among multicellular organisms, and where it does occur, it is not clear that it is always the result of the same ultimate or proximate mechanisms. In this contributed book, some of the leading scientists in ageing research offer an in-depth, updated understanding of the mechanisms behind senescence, using cutting-edge approaches and species representing a wide evolutionary diversity of life.

AB - We humans have long wondered about the seemingly inevitable physiological decline that happens after our maturity. This phenomenon, known as ‘senescence’, is recognised as the physiological deterioration that results in increasing age-specific mortality or decreasing age-specific fertility at or beyond some age in maturity. But is this phenomenon universal, and is it always the result of the same processes? Although evolutionary theories of ageing exist that suggest that senescence should be universal, empirical data increasingly suggest that senescence may not necessarily be a ubiquitous feature among multicellular organisms, and where it does occur, it is not clear that it is always the result of the same ultimate or proximate mechanisms. In this contributed book, some of the leading scientists in ageing research offer an in-depth, updated understanding of the mechanisms behind senescence, using cutting-edge approaches and species representing a wide evolutionary diversity of life.

U2 - 10.1017/9781139939867.001

DO - 10.1017/9781139939867.001

M3 - Book chapter

SN - 978-1107078505

SP - 1

EP - 20

BT - The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life

A2 - Shefferson, Richard

A2 - Jones, Owen

A2 - Salguero-Gomez, Roberto

PB - Cambridge University Press

CY - Cambridge, UK

ER -

Shefferson R, Jones O, Salguero-Gómez R. Introduction: Wilting Leaves and Rotting Branches: Reconciling Evolutionary Perspectives on Senescence. In Shefferson R, Jones O, Salguero-Gomez R, editors, The Evolution of Senescence in the Tree of Life. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 2017. p. 1-20 https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139939867.001