Introduction: Competence demands in today's networked world

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This book addresses the skills required for living in present-day society and ways in which educators may facilitate the learning hereof. Because – as we shall argue – present-day society to a large extent is networked and because arranging to facilitate others’ learning is most adequately viewed as a designing for learning, the book accordingly investigates designing for learning in a networked world. It aims to provide answers to the following three questions:

What skills are required for living in a networked world?

How can educators design for learning these skills?

What role can and should networked learning play in living and learning in a networked world?

In accordance with Jones (2015) and Carvalho and Goodyear (2014), the term 'n etworked learning' in the last question refers to learning in and through networks. The book speaks into current debates about the knowledge and skills necessary to thrive in contemporary society; as individual, group, nation, even as civilisation – “21stt century skills”, as they are commonly and popularly called (Trilling and Fadel, 2009; P21, n.d.; Beetham and Sharpe, 2013; Chu et al., 2017; Kivunja, 2014). Our goal is to provide a balanced exposition of skills required, with a focus specifically on the demands that become apparent by looking at the world through the lens of it being ‘networked’. Balance is sought by, on the one hand, acknowledging the novel challenges posed by today’s technology and communicative practices whilst, on the other hand, not neglecting the many continuities in competence demands across the shift in millennial digits following from contingent conventional Western chronology. Many of the skills needed in the 21st century were also needed in the 20th as well as in centuries before that. For this reason, we find it more constructive to focus on what characterises present-day societal competence demands, given that the world is networked, irrespective of the confinement or not of these demands to the 21st century. We do not purport to supply an exhaustive list of skills, but rather to provide a cogent exposition of some of the important ones, centring on how they manifest themselves and interrelate, as well as on how they may be taught and learned. We should stress that we speak of ‘present-day’ society because this is the society available for 4analysis, but that we do so with the expectation that the world of tomorrow for which education aims to educate may be similarly characterised as networked and for this reason will require similar skills to the ones needed today.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDesigning for Learning in a Networked World
EditorsNina Bonderup Dohn
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Publication date2018
Pages3-24
Chapter1
ISBN (Print)978-0-8153-7843-3
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-351-23235-7
Publication statusPublished - 2018
SeriesRoutledge Research in Education

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Dohn, N. B. (2018). Introduction: Competence demands in today's networked world. In N. B. Dohn (Ed.), Designing for Learning in a Networked World (pp. 3-24). London: Routledge. Routledge Research in Education
Dohn, Nina Bonderup. / Introduction: Competence demands in today's networked world. Designing for Learning in a Networked World. editor / Nina Bonderup Dohn. London : Routledge, 2018. pp. 3-24 (Routledge Research in Education).
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Dohn, NB 2018, Introduction: Competence demands in today's networked world. in NB Dohn (ed.), Designing for Learning in a Networked World. Routledge, London, Routledge Research in Education, pp. 3-24.

Introduction: Competence demands in today's networked world. / Dohn, Nina Bonderup.

Designing for Learning in a Networked World. ed. / Nina Bonderup Dohn. London : Routledge, 2018. p. 3-24 (Routledge Research in Education).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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N2 - This book addresses the skills required for living in present-day society and ways in which educators may facilitate the learning hereof. Because – as we shall argue – present-day society to a large extent is networked and because arranging to facilitate others’ learning is most adequately viewed as a designing for learning, the book accordingly investigates designing for learning in a networked world. It aims to provide answers to the following three questions:What skills are required for living in a networked world?How can educators design for learning these skills?What role can and should networked learning play in living and learning in a networked world?In accordance with Jones (2015) and Carvalho and Goodyear (2014), the term 'n etworked learning' in the last question refers to learning in and through networks. The book speaks into current debates about the knowledge and skills necessary to thrive in contemporary society; as individual, group, nation, even as civilisation – “21stt century skills”, as they are commonly and popularly called (Trilling and Fadel, 2009; P21, n.d.; Beetham and Sharpe, 2013; Chu et al., 2017; Kivunja, 2014). Our goal is to provide a balanced exposition of skills required, with a focus specifically on the demands that become apparent by looking at the world through the lens of it being ‘networked’. Balance is sought by, on the one hand, acknowledging the novel challenges posed by today’s technology and communicative practices whilst, on the other hand, not neglecting the many continuities in competence demands across the shift in millennial digits following from contingent conventional Western chronology. Many of the skills needed in the 21st century were also needed in the 20th as well as in centuries before that. For this reason, we find it more constructive to focus on what characterises present-day societal competence demands, given that the world is networked, irrespective of the confinement or not of these demands to the 21st century. We do not purport to supply an exhaustive list of skills, but rather to provide a cogent exposition of some of the important ones, centring on how they manifest themselves and interrelate, as well as on how they may be taught and learned. We should stress that we speak of ‘present-day’ society because this is the society available for 4analysis, but that we do so with the expectation that the world of tomorrow for which education aims to educate may be similarly characterised as networked and for this reason will require similar skills to the ones needed today.

AB - This book addresses the skills required for living in present-day society and ways in which educators may facilitate the learning hereof. Because – as we shall argue – present-day society to a large extent is networked and because arranging to facilitate others’ learning is most adequately viewed as a designing for learning, the book accordingly investigates designing for learning in a networked world. It aims to provide answers to the following three questions:What skills are required for living in a networked world?How can educators design for learning these skills?What role can and should networked learning play in living and learning in a networked world?In accordance with Jones (2015) and Carvalho and Goodyear (2014), the term 'n etworked learning' in the last question refers to learning in and through networks. The book speaks into current debates about the knowledge and skills necessary to thrive in contemporary society; as individual, group, nation, even as civilisation – “21stt century skills”, as they are commonly and popularly called (Trilling and Fadel, 2009; P21, n.d.; Beetham and Sharpe, 2013; Chu et al., 2017; Kivunja, 2014). Our goal is to provide a balanced exposition of skills required, with a focus specifically on the demands that become apparent by looking at the world through the lens of it being ‘networked’. Balance is sought by, on the one hand, acknowledging the novel challenges posed by today’s technology and communicative practices whilst, on the other hand, not neglecting the many continuities in competence demands across the shift in millennial digits following from contingent conventional Western chronology. Many of the skills needed in the 21st century were also needed in the 20th as well as in centuries before that. For this reason, we find it more constructive to focus on what characterises present-day societal competence demands, given that the world is networked, irrespective of the confinement or not of these demands to the 21st century. We do not purport to supply an exhaustive list of skills, but rather to provide a cogent exposition of some of the important ones, centring on how they manifest themselves and interrelate, as well as on how they may be taught and learned. We should stress that we speak of ‘present-day’ society because this is the society available for 4analysis, but that we do so with the expectation that the world of tomorrow for which education aims to educate may be similarly characterised as networked and for this reason will require similar skills to the ones needed today.

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Dohn NB. Introduction: Competence demands in today's networked world. In Dohn NB, editor, Designing for Learning in a Networked World. London: Routledge. 2018. p. 3-24. (Routledge Research in Education).