Intramuscular pressure and EMG relate during static contractions but dissociate with movement and fatigue

Gisela Sjøgaard, Bente R Jensen, Alan R Hargens, Karen Søgaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Intramuscular pressure (IMP) and electromyography (EMG) mirror muscle force in the nonfatigued muscle during static contractions. The present study explores whether the constant IMP-EMG relationship with increased force may be extended to dynamic contractions and to fatigued muscle. IMP and EMG were recorded from shoulder muscles in three sessions: 1). brief static arm abductions at angles from 0 to 90 degrees, with and without 1 kg in the hands; 2). dynamic arm abductions at angular velocities from 9 to 90 degrees /s, with and without 1 kg in the hands; and 3). prolonged static arm abduction at 30 degrees for 30 min followed by recovery. IMP and EMG increased in parallel with increasing shoulder torque during brief static tasks. During dynamic contractions, peak IMP and EMG increased to values higher than those during static contractions, and EMG, but not IMP, increased significantly with speed of abduction. In the nonfatigued supraspinatus muscle, a linear relationship was found between IMP and EMG; in contrast, during fatigue and recovery, significant timewise changes of the IMP-to-EMG ratio occurred. The results indicate that IMP should be included along with EMG when mechanical load sharing between muscles is evaluated during dynamic and fatiguing contractions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume96
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)1522-9; discussion
ISSN8750-7587
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Apr 2004

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