Increasing prevalence of emotional symptoms in higher socioeconomic strata

Trend study among Danish schoolchildren 1991–2014

Pernille Due, Mogens T. Damsgaard, Katrine R. Madsen, Line Nielsen, Signe B. Rayce, Bjørn E. Holstein*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

AIMS: The aims of this study were: (a) to examine trends in daily emotional symptoms among 11- to 15-year-olds from 1991 to 2014 in Denmark, and (b) to examine trends in social inequality in daily emotional symptoms, that is, whether the differences in prevalence between adolescents with parents of varying occupational social class changed over time.

METHODS: We combined seven comparable cross-sectional Health Behaviour in School-aged Children surveys ( N=31,169). Daily emotional symptoms were measured by the HBSC Symptom Check List and occupational social class (OSC) by students' reports about parents' occupation. We calculated absolute (per cent) differences in emotional symptoms between high and low OSC and relative differences by odds ratio for emotional symptoms by parents' OSC.

RESULTS: Eight per cent reported at least one daily emotional symptoms, with an increasing trend from 1991 to 2014 ( p<0.001). The prevalence in high, middle and low OSC was 6.2%, 7.4% and 10.6% ( p<0.0001). From 1991 to 2014, there was an increase in the prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in high ( p<0.0001) and middle ( p<0.0001) but not low OSC ( p=0.4404). This resulted in a diminishing absolute social inequality in emotional symptoms. The statistical interaction between OSC and survey year was significant ( p=0.0023) and suggests a diminishing relative social inequality in emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014.

CONCLUSIONS: There was an increasing prevalence of daily emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014 and a diminishing social inequality in prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in terms of both absolute and relative social inequality.

Original languageEnglish
Book seriesScandinavian Journal of Public Health
ISSN1403-4948
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 1. Jan 2018

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Parents
Odds Ratio
Health Behavior
Denmark
Occupations
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • children
  • emotional symptoms
  • social inequality
  • trend

Cite this

@article{03a4fcc298fd4fcfa6427d354da28552,
title = "Increasing prevalence of emotional symptoms in higher socioeconomic strata: Trend study among Danish schoolchildren 1991–2014",
abstract = "AIMS: The aims of this study were: (a) to examine trends in daily emotional symptoms among 11- to 15-year-olds from 1991 to 2014 in Denmark, and (b) to examine trends in social inequality in daily emotional symptoms, that is, whether the differences in prevalence between adolescents with parents of varying occupational social class changed over time.METHODS: We combined seven comparable cross-sectional Health Behaviour in School-aged Children surveys ( N=31,169). Daily emotional symptoms were measured by the HBSC Symptom Check List and occupational social class (OSC) by students' reports about parents' occupation. We calculated absolute (per cent) differences in emotional symptoms between high and low OSC and relative differences by odds ratio for emotional symptoms by parents' OSC.RESULTS: Eight per cent reported at least one daily emotional symptoms, with an increasing trend from 1991 to 2014 ( p<0.001). The prevalence in high, middle and low OSC was 6.2{\%}, 7.4{\%} and 10.6{\%} ( p<0.0001). From 1991 to 2014, there was an increase in the prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in high ( p<0.0001) and middle ( p<0.0001) but not low OSC ( p=0.4404). This resulted in a diminishing absolute social inequality in emotional symptoms. The statistical interaction between OSC and survey year was significant ( p=0.0023) and suggests a diminishing relative social inequality in emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014.CONCLUSIONS: There was an increasing prevalence of daily emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014 and a diminishing social inequality in prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in terms of both absolute and relative social inequality.",
keywords = "Adolescents, children, emotional symptoms, social inequality, trend",
author = "Pernille Due and Damsgaard, {Mogens T.} and Madsen, {Katrine R.} and Line Nielsen and Rayce, {Signe B.} and Holstein, {Bj{\o}rn E.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1403494817752520",
language = "English",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement",
issn = "1403-4956",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increasing prevalence of emotional symptoms in higher socioeconomic strata

T2 - Trend study among Danish schoolchildren 1991–2014

AU - Due, Pernille

AU - Damsgaard, Mogens T.

AU - Madsen, Katrine R.

AU - Nielsen, Line

AU - Rayce, Signe B.

AU - Holstein, Bjørn E.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - AIMS: The aims of this study were: (a) to examine trends in daily emotional symptoms among 11- to 15-year-olds from 1991 to 2014 in Denmark, and (b) to examine trends in social inequality in daily emotional symptoms, that is, whether the differences in prevalence between adolescents with parents of varying occupational social class changed over time.METHODS: We combined seven comparable cross-sectional Health Behaviour in School-aged Children surveys ( N=31,169). Daily emotional symptoms were measured by the HBSC Symptom Check List and occupational social class (OSC) by students' reports about parents' occupation. We calculated absolute (per cent) differences in emotional symptoms between high and low OSC and relative differences by odds ratio for emotional symptoms by parents' OSC.RESULTS: Eight per cent reported at least one daily emotional symptoms, with an increasing trend from 1991 to 2014 ( p<0.001). The prevalence in high, middle and low OSC was 6.2%, 7.4% and 10.6% ( p<0.0001). From 1991 to 2014, there was an increase in the prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in high ( p<0.0001) and middle ( p<0.0001) but not low OSC ( p=0.4404). This resulted in a diminishing absolute social inequality in emotional symptoms. The statistical interaction between OSC and survey year was significant ( p=0.0023) and suggests a diminishing relative social inequality in emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014.CONCLUSIONS: There was an increasing prevalence of daily emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014 and a diminishing social inequality in prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in terms of both absolute and relative social inequality.

AB - AIMS: The aims of this study were: (a) to examine trends in daily emotional symptoms among 11- to 15-year-olds from 1991 to 2014 in Denmark, and (b) to examine trends in social inequality in daily emotional symptoms, that is, whether the differences in prevalence between adolescents with parents of varying occupational social class changed over time.METHODS: We combined seven comparable cross-sectional Health Behaviour in School-aged Children surveys ( N=31,169). Daily emotional symptoms were measured by the HBSC Symptom Check List and occupational social class (OSC) by students' reports about parents' occupation. We calculated absolute (per cent) differences in emotional symptoms between high and low OSC and relative differences by odds ratio for emotional symptoms by parents' OSC.RESULTS: Eight per cent reported at least one daily emotional symptoms, with an increasing trend from 1991 to 2014 ( p<0.001). The prevalence in high, middle and low OSC was 6.2%, 7.4% and 10.6% ( p<0.0001). From 1991 to 2014, there was an increase in the prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in high ( p<0.0001) and middle ( p<0.0001) but not low OSC ( p=0.4404). This resulted in a diminishing absolute social inequality in emotional symptoms. The statistical interaction between OSC and survey year was significant ( p=0.0023) and suggests a diminishing relative social inequality in emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014.CONCLUSIONS: There was an increasing prevalence of daily emotional symptoms from 1991 to 2014 and a diminishing social inequality in prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in terms of both absolute and relative social inequality.

KW - Adolescents

KW - children

KW - emotional symptoms

KW - social inequality

KW - trend

U2 - 10.1177/1403494817752520

DO - 10.1177/1403494817752520

M3 - Journal article

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. Supplement

SN - 1403-4956

ER -