Increasing complexity of the bacterial cytoskeleton

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearch

Abstract

Bacteria contain cytoskeletal elements involved in major cellular processes including DNA segregation and cell morphogenesis and division. Distant bacterial homologues of tubulin (FtsZ) and actin (MreB and ParM) not only resemble their eukaryotic counterparts structurally but also show similar functional characteristics, assembling into filamentous structures in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopic imaging have revealed that FtsZ and MreB form highly dynamic helical structures that encircle the cells along the inside of the cell membrane. With the discovery of crescentin, a cell-shape-determining protein that resembles eukaryotic intermediate filament proteins, the third major cytoskeletal element has now been identified in bacteria as well.


Udgivelsesdato: Feb 2005
Original languageEnglish
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cell Biology
Volume17
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)75-81
Number of pages7
ISSN0955-0674
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Feb 2005

Cite this

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title = "Increasing complexity of the bacterial cytoskeleton",
abstract = "Bacteria contain cytoskeletal elements involved in major cellular processes including DNA segregation and cell morphogenesis and division. Distant bacterial homologues of tubulin (FtsZ) and actin (MreB and ParM) not only resemble their eukaryotic counterparts structurally but also show similar functional characteristics, assembling into filamentous structures in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopic imaging have revealed that FtsZ and MreB form highly dynamic helical structures that encircle the cells along the inside of the cell membrane. With the discovery of crescentin, a cell-shape-determining protein that resembles eukaryotic intermediate filament proteins, the third major cytoskeletal element has now been identified in bacteria as well. Udgivelsesdato: Feb 2005",
author = "Jakob M{\o}ller-Jensen and Jan L{\"o}we",
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language = "English",
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Increasing complexity of the bacterial cytoskeleton. / Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Löwe, Jan.

In: Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.02.2005, p. 75-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearch

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increasing complexity of the bacterial cytoskeleton

AU - Møller-Jensen, Jakob

AU - Löwe, Jan

PY - 2005/2/1

Y1 - 2005/2/1

N2 - Bacteria contain cytoskeletal elements involved in major cellular processes including DNA segregation and cell morphogenesis and division. Distant bacterial homologues of tubulin (FtsZ) and actin (MreB and ParM) not only resemble their eukaryotic counterparts structurally but also show similar functional characteristics, assembling into filamentous structures in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopic imaging have revealed that FtsZ and MreB form highly dynamic helical structures that encircle the cells along the inside of the cell membrane. With the discovery of crescentin, a cell-shape-determining protein that resembles eukaryotic intermediate filament proteins, the third major cytoskeletal element has now been identified in bacteria as well. Udgivelsesdato: Feb 2005

AB - Bacteria contain cytoskeletal elements involved in major cellular processes including DNA segregation and cell morphogenesis and division. Distant bacterial homologues of tubulin (FtsZ) and actin (MreB and ParM) not only resemble their eukaryotic counterparts structurally but also show similar functional characteristics, assembling into filamentous structures in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Recent advances in fluorescence microscopic imaging have revealed that FtsZ and MreB form highly dynamic helical structures that encircle the cells along the inside of the cell membrane. With the discovery of crescentin, a cell-shape-determining protein that resembles eukaryotic intermediate filament proteins, the third major cytoskeletal element has now been identified in bacteria as well. Udgivelsesdato: Feb 2005

U2 - 10.1016/j.ceb.2004.11.002

DO - 10.1016/j.ceb.2004.11.002

M3 - Review

C2 - 15661522

VL - 17

SP - 75

EP - 81

JO - Current Opinion in Cell Biology

JF - Current Opinion in Cell Biology

SN - 0955-0674

IS - 1

ER -