Identification of oceanic hotspots for production of the neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine: a multidisciplinary ocean-prospecting study

Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearch

58 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an inducer of neurodegenerative disorders. Chronic ingestion of BMAA through the food chain has been suggested to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other related pathologies, including Parkinson's. BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria in various environments, including the ocean, and BMAA production increases under nitrogen-depleted conditions in pure cultures of non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. In the ocean, a large proportion of primary production of biomassis done by cyanobacteria, mostly in regions connected to highly productive eastern boundary upwelling systems. Those regions are often characterised by strong oxygen depletion, and enhanced nitrogen loss, but provide an essential fraction of fish production for local and global nutritional needs. Thus, these upwelling areas connected to oxygen-depleted intermediate waters are of great interest in terms of BMAA transfer to humans through the food chain. The predicted expansion of those oxygen-depleted and nitrogen-depleted waters might thus have a severe effect on BMAA production and consequently on human health.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Lancet Planetary Health
Volume2
Issue numberS24
ISSN2542-5196
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventPlanetary Health/GeoHealth Annual Meeting 2018 - McEwan Hall, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 29. May 201831. May 2018

Conference

ConferencePlanetary Health/GeoHealth Annual Meeting 2018
LocationMcEwan Hall, University of Edinburgh
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period29/05/201831/05/2018

Fingerprint

Neurotoxins
Alanine
Nitrogen
Food Chain
Oxygen
food
Neurodegenerative Diseases
water
Fishes
pathology
Pathology
Health
cause
health

Cite this

@article{300dc172c83d4cc99382c58896d90cc3,
title = "Identification of oceanic hotspots for production of the neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine: a multidisciplinary ocean-prospecting study",
abstract = "β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an inducer of neurodegenerative disorders. Chronic ingestion of BMAA through the food chain has been suggested to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other related pathologies, including Parkinson's. BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria in various environments, including the ocean, and BMAA production increases under nitrogen-depleted conditions in pure cultures of non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. In the ocean, a large proportion of primary production of biomassis done by cyanobacteria, mostly in regions connected to highly productive eastern boundary upwelling systems. Those regions are often characterised by strong oxygen depletion, and enhanced nitrogen loss, but provide an essential fraction of fish production for local and global nutritional needs. Thus, these upwelling areas connected to oxygen-depleted intermediate waters are of great interest in terms of BMAA transfer to humans through the food chain. The predicted expansion of those oxygen-depleted and nitrogen-depleted waters might thus have a severe effect on BMAA production and consequently on human health.",
author = "Carolin L{\"o}scher",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/S2542-5196(18)30109-8",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
journal = "The Lancet Planetary Health",
issn = "2542-5196",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "S24",

}

TY - ABST

T1 - Identification of oceanic hotspots for production of the neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine: a multidisciplinary ocean-prospecting study

AU - Löscher, Carolin

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an inducer of neurodegenerative disorders. Chronic ingestion of BMAA through the food chain has been suggested to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other related pathologies, including Parkinson's. BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria in various environments, including the ocean, and BMAA production increases under nitrogen-depleted conditions in pure cultures of non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. In the ocean, a large proportion of primary production of biomassis done by cyanobacteria, mostly in regions connected to highly productive eastern boundary upwelling systems. Those regions are often characterised by strong oxygen depletion, and enhanced nitrogen loss, but provide an essential fraction of fish production for local and global nutritional needs. Thus, these upwelling areas connected to oxygen-depleted intermediate waters are of great interest in terms of BMAA transfer to humans through the food chain. The predicted expansion of those oxygen-depleted and nitrogen-depleted waters might thus have a severe effect on BMAA production and consequently on human health.

AB - β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an inducer of neurodegenerative disorders. Chronic ingestion of BMAA through the food chain has been suggested to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other related pathologies, including Parkinson's. BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria in various environments, including the ocean, and BMAA production increases under nitrogen-depleted conditions in pure cultures of non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. In the ocean, a large proportion of primary production of biomassis done by cyanobacteria, mostly in regions connected to highly productive eastern boundary upwelling systems. Those regions are often characterised by strong oxygen depletion, and enhanced nitrogen loss, but provide an essential fraction of fish production for local and global nutritional needs. Thus, these upwelling areas connected to oxygen-depleted intermediate waters are of great interest in terms of BMAA transfer to humans through the food chain. The predicted expansion of those oxygen-depleted and nitrogen-depleted waters might thus have a severe effect on BMAA production and consequently on human health.

U2 - 10.1016/S2542-5196(18)30109-8

DO - 10.1016/S2542-5196(18)30109-8

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 2

JO - The Lancet Planetary Health

JF - The Lancet Planetary Health

SN - 2542-5196

IS - S24

ER -