Hyper Spectral Imaging and the Herlufsholm Special Collection

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In 2017, the University Library of Southern Denmark was contacted by the Danish company Newtec Engineering in Odense who wanted to test their Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) technology on a selection of old books containing unreadable texts in their bindings. The company develops weighing, packaging and optical sorting machinery for the food industry.
The hypothesis was that Newtec’s HSI and optical scans in the near infrared spectrum would make it easier to read texts on worn medieval parchments and underneath layers of paper. Across the world, Multi Spectral Imaging and HSI have already proven themselves useful for this purpose. Therefore, a selection of monographies from the Herlufsholm Special Collection was brought to the company for optical scans, using the same kind of HSI technology that is deployed in the quality control of fruit and vegetables etc. In the experimental HSI setup, the book travels on a conveyor belt underneath special cameras and lighting. The images are sent to a pc. Among the scanned books, we have chosen to present the case of a 1583 copy of Commentariorum de Religione Christiana Libri quatuor by Petrus Ramus which has turned out to contain a medieval liturgical text on its cover, possibly stemming from a missal. Most likely, this fragment was fitted as part of the bookbinding by a 16th century bookbinder. Passages in the document were identified using full text searches in Google and in the Cantus Index http://cantusindex.org/. From a Digital Humanities perspective, the combination of HSI and Data Mining is a powerful tool when it comes to the reading and rapid identification of the above-mentioned type of fragments. It also stands to reason that both industrial companies and university libraries may benefit from these kinds of collaborations: The library is provided with an identification and the company gains technological insights.

Conference

ConferenceAIUCD 2019
Number8
LocationPalazzo Garzolini di Toppo Wassermann
CountryItaly
CityUdine
Period23/01/201925/01/2019
Internet address

Fingerprint

Hyperspectral Imaging
Optical
Medieval Period
Industry
Infrared
Multispectral Imaging
Food
Quality Control
Belt
Vegetables
Packaging
Fruit
Bookbinding
Denmark
Data Mining
Missal
Layer
Travel Books
Liturgical Texts
Cantus

Keywords

  • Hyper Spectral Imaging
  • fragments
  • Middle Ages
  • Danish Industry
  • University Library of Southern Denmark
  • Newtec Engineering
  • Herlufsholm
  • Special Collections

Cite this

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title = "Hyper Spectral Imaging and the Herlufsholm Special Collection",
abstract = "In 2017, the University Library of Southern Denmark was contacted by the Danish company Newtec Engineering in Odense who wanted to test their Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) technology on a selection of old books containing unreadable texts in their bindings. The company develops weighing, packaging and optical sorting machinery for the food industry. The hypothesis was that Newtec’s HSI and optical scans in the near infrared spectrum would make it easier to read texts on worn medieval parchments and underneath layers of paper. Across the world, Multi Spectral Imaging and HSI have already proven themselves useful for this purpose. Therefore, a selection of monographies from the Herlufsholm Special Collection was brought to the company for optical scans, using the same kind of HSI technology that is deployed in the quality control of fruit and vegetables etc. In the experimental HSI setup, the book travels on a conveyor belt underneath special cameras and lighting. The images are sent to a pc. Among the scanned books, we have chosen to present the case of a 1583 copy of Commentariorum de Religione Christiana Libri quatuor by Petrus Ramus which has turned out to contain a medieval liturgical text on its cover, possibly stemming from a missal. Most likely, this fragment was fitted as part of the bookbinding by a 16th century bookbinder. Passages in the document were identified using full text searches in Google and in the Cantus Index http://cantusindex.org/. From a Digital Humanities perspective, the combination of HSI and Data Mining is a powerful tool when it comes to the reading and rapid identification of the above-mentioned type of fragments. It also stands to reason that both industrial companies and university libraries may benefit from these kinds of collaborations: The library is provided with an identification and the company gains technological insights.",
keywords = "Hyper Spectral Imaging, fragments, Middle Ages, Danish Industry, University Library of Southern Denmark, Newtec Engineering, Herlufsholm, Special Collections",
author = "Holck, {Jakob Povl} and Jensen, {Mogens Kragsig} and Husen, {Kamilla Jensen} and Jespersen, {Anne Helle}",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
pages = "1",
note = "AIUCD 2019 : Pedagogy, Teaching, and Research in the Age of Digital Humanities ; Conference date: 23-01-2019 Through 25-01-2019",
url = "http://aiucd2019.uniud.it/",

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Hyper Spectral Imaging and the Herlufsholm Special Collection. / Holck, Jakob Povl; Jensen, Mogens Kragsig; Husen, Kamilla Jensen; Jespersen, Anne Helle.

2019. 1 Poster session presented at AIUCD 2019, Udine, Italy.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPosterResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Hyper Spectral Imaging and the Herlufsholm Special Collection

AU - Holck, Jakob Povl

AU - Jensen, Mogens Kragsig

AU - Husen, Kamilla Jensen

AU - Jespersen, Anne Helle

PY - 2019/1/23

Y1 - 2019/1/23

N2 - In 2017, the University Library of Southern Denmark was contacted by the Danish company Newtec Engineering in Odense who wanted to test their Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) technology on a selection of old books containing unreadable texts in their bindings. The company develops weighing, packaging and optical sorting machinery for the food industry. The hypothesis was that Newtec’s HSI and optical scans in the near infrared spectrum would make it easier to read texts on worn medieval parchments and underneath layers of paper. Across the world, Multi Spectral Imaging and HSI have already proven themselves useful for this purpose. Therefore, a selection of monographies from the Herlufsholm Special Collection was brought to the company for optical scans, using the same kind of HSI technology that is deployed in the quality control of fruit and vegetables etc. In the experimental HSI setup, the book travels on a conveyor belt underneath special cameras and lighting. The images are sent to a pc. Among the scanned books, we have chosen to present the case of a 1583 copy of Commentariorum de Religione Christiana Libri quatuor by Petrus Ramus which has turned out to contain a medieval liturgical text on its cover, possibly stemming from a missal. Most likely, this fragment was fitted as part of the bookbinding by a 16th century bookbinder. Passages in the document were identified using full text searches in Google and in the Cantus Index http://cantusindex.org/. From a Digital Humanities perspective, the combination of HSI and Data Mining is a powerful tool when it comes to the reading and rapid identification of the above-mentioned type of fragments. It also stands to reason that both industrial companies and university libraries may benefit from these kinds of collaborations: The library is provided with an identification and the company gains technological insights.

AB - In 2017, the University Library of Southern Denmark was contacted by the Danish company Newtec Engineering in Odense who wanted to test their Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI) technology on a selection of old books containing unreadable texts in their bindings. The company develops weighing, packaging and optical sorting machinery for the food industry. The hypothesis was that Newtec’s HSI and optical scans in the near infrared spectrum would make it easier to read texts on worn medieval parchments and underneath layers of paper. Across the world, Multi Spectral Imaging and HSI have already proven themselves useful for this purpose. Therefore, a selection of monographies from the Herlufsholm Special Collection was brought to the company for optical scans, using the same kind of HSI technology that is deployed in the quality control of fruit and vegetables etc. In the experimental HSI setup, the book travels on a conveyor belt underneath special cameras and lighting. The images are sent to a pc. Among the scanned books, we have chosen to present the case of a 1583 copy of Commentariorum de Religione Christiana Libri quatuor by Petrus Ramus which has turned out to contain a medieval liturgical text on its cover, possibly stemming from a missal. Most likely, this fragment was fitted as part of the bookbinding by a 16th century bookbinder. Passages in the document were identified using full text searches in Google and in the Cantus Index http://cantusindex.org/. From a Digital Humanities perspective, the combination of HSI and Data Mining is a powerful tool when it comes to the reading and rapid identification of the above-mentioned type of fragments. It also stands to reason that both industrial companies and university libraries may benefit from these kinds of collaborations: The library is provided with an identification and the company gains technological insights.

KW - Hyper Spectral Imaging

KW - fragments

KW - Middle Ages

KW - Danish Industry

KW - University Library of Southern Denmark

KW - Newtec Engineering

KW - Herlufsholm

KW - Special Collections

M3 - Poster

SP - 1

ER -