Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls

what is the functional interaural canal?

Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, Jakob Christensen-Dalsgaard

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

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Abstract

Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal?
Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, and Jakob Christensen-Dalsgaard
Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark

The middle ears of birds are acoustically coupled through an air-filled interaural canal (IAC) often illustrated and modelled as a simple tube, which allows sound to propagate through the skull from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing. Theoretically, different combinations of frequency dependent gains and delays in the IAC can produce very different directionalities of the ears but it is still uncertain how interaural transmission gain and delay can be shaped by evolution by anatomical adaptations. A closer inspection of the zebra finch cranium using micro-CT scanning reveals that not only is IAC trabeculated and irregularly shaped but it also communicates with a set of highly complex, air-filled canals in the skull extending to the base of the beak. We tested the possible influence of these communicating cavities by measuring eardrum directionality and interaural transmission before and after filling the frontal cavities but found no dramatic effects. The question still remains what function these cavities serve and whether the ICA should be modelled as a simple tube.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date16. Jun 2014
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 16. Jun 2014
EventInternally Coupled Ears: Evolutionary Origins, Mechanisms, and Neuronal Processing from a Biomimetic Perspective - Institut for Advanced Study, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 2 a, Garching, Germany
Duration: 18. Jun 201420. Jun 2014

Conference

ConferenceInternally Coupled Ears
LocationInstitut for Advanced Study, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 2 a
CountryGermany
CityGarching
Period18/06/201420/06/2014

Cite this

Larsen, O. N., Salomon, R., Jensen, K. K., & Christensen-Dalsgaard, J. (2014). Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal?. Abstract from Internally Coupled Ears, Garching, Germany.
Larsen, Ole Næsbye ; Salomon, Rasmus ; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh ; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob. / Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls : what is the functional interaural canal?. Abstract from Internally Coupled Ears, Garching, Germany.1 p.
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Larsen, ON, Salomon, R, Jensen, KK & Christensen-Dalsgaard, J 2014, 'Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal?', Garching, Germany, 18/06/2014 - 20/06/2014, .

Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls : what is the functional interaural canal? / Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh ; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob.

2014. Abstract from Internally Coupled Ears, Garching, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

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AU - Larsen, Ole Næsbye

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N2 - Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal? Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, and Jakob Christensen-DalsgaardDepartment of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, DenmarkThe middle ears of birds are acoustically coupled through an air-filled interaural canal (IAC) often illustrated and modelled as a simple tube, which allows sound to propagate through the skull from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing. Theoretically, different combinations of frequency dependent gains and delays in the IAC can produce very different directionalities of the ears but it is still uncertain how interaural transmission gain and delay can be shaped by evolution by anatomical adaptations. A closer inspection of the zebra finch cranium using micro-CT scanning reveals that not only is IAC trabeculated and irregularly shaped but it also communicates with a set of highly complex, air-filled canals in the skull extending to the base of the beak. We tested the possible influence of these communicating cavities by measuring eardrum directionality and interaural transmission before and after filling the frontal cavities but found no dramatic effects. The question still remains what function these cavities serve and whether the ICA should be modelled as a simple tube.

AB - Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal? Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, and Jakob Christensen-DalsgaardDepartment of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, DenmarkThe middle ears of birds are acoustically coupled through an air-filled interaural canal (IAC) often illustrated and modelled as a simple tube, which allows sound to propagate through the skull from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing. Theoretically, different combinations of frequency dependent gains and delays in the IAC can produce very different directionalities of the ears but it is still uncertain how interaural transmission gain and delay can be shaped by evolution by anatomical adaptations. A closer inspection of the zebra finch cranium using micro-CT scanning reveals that not only is IAC trabeculated and irregularly shaped but it also communicates with a set of highly complex, air-filled canals in the skull extending to the base of the beak. We tested the possible influence of these communicating cavities by measuring eardrum directionality and interaural transmission before and after filling the frontal cavities but found no dramatic effects. The question still remains what function these cavities serve and whether the ICA should be modelled as a simple tube.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

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Larsen ON, Salomon R, Jensen KK, Christensen-Dalsgaard J. Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal?. 2014. Abstract from Internally Coupled Ears, Garching, Germany.