How to Teach Political Advice: Bringing the Daily Life of the Minister into the Classroom

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaperResearch

Abstract

This paper reports on a summer course titled “The Political Secretariat” referring to the personal office of top elected political leaders like ministers or mayors and their top administrative advisor (Permanent Secretary or City Manager). Such offices are, in accordance with the Danish tradition, staffed with permanent civil servants rather than politically appointed persons. The aim of the course is to train the students in servicing the political and administrative top leaders of a politically led organization that is exposed to daily attention from the public, media and opposition. The course runs for four weeks in august. In those four weeks, the work in a specific political secretariat is simulated covering three ministries and one local government: Ministry of Higher Education and Science, Ministry of Finance, The City of Odense and finally Ministry of Education. Cases were developed in close cooperation with the ministries and the mayor’s office.

Besides training students to work under pressure, to write short and precise memos, to work in groups as well as on their own, to assess the political aspects of an issue, the course had some rather positive side effects in terms of student motivation and involvement, not only in the course as such but probably also as far as the rest of their university studies go.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date13. Mar 2014
Number of pages13
Publication statusPublished - 13. Mar 2014
Event72nd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference - Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, United States
Duration: 3. Apr 20146. Apr 2014
Conference number: 72

Conference

Conference72nd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference
Number72
LocationPalmer House Hilton
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period03/04/201406/04/2014

Cite this

Mouritzen, P. E. (2014). How to Teach Political Advice: Bringing the Daily Life of the Minister into the Classroom. Paper presented at 72nd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, United States.
Mouritzen, Poul Erik. / How to Teach Political Advice : Bringing the Daily Life of the Minister into the Classroom. Paper presented at 72nd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, United States.13 p.
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Mouritzen, PE 2014, 'How to Teach Political Advice: Bringing the Daily Life of the Minister into the Classroom', Paper presented at 72nd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, United States, 03/04/2014 - 06/04/2014.

How to Teach Political Advice : Bringing the Daily Life of the Minister into the Classroom. / Mouritzen, Poul Erik.

2014. Paper presented at 72nd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalPaperResearch

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PY - 2014/3/13

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N2 - This paper reports on a summer course titled “The Political Secretariat” referring to the personal office of top elected political leaders like ministers or mayors and their top administrative advisor (Permanent Secretary or City Manager). Such offices are, in accordance with the Danish tradition, staffed with permanent civil servants rather than politically appointed persons. The aim of the course is to train the students in servicing the political and administrative top leaders of a politically led organization that is exposed to daily attention from the public, media and opposition. The course runs for four weeks in august. In those four weeks, the work in a specific political secretariat is simulated covering three ministries and one local government: Ministry of Higher Education and Science, Ministry of Finance, The City of Odense and finally Ministry of Education. Cases were developed in close cooperation with the ministries and the mayor’s office. Besides training students to work under pressure, to write short and precise memos, to work in groups as well as on their own, to assess the political aspects of an issue, the course had some rather positive side effects in terms of student motivation and involvement, not only in the course as such but probably also as far as the rest of their university studies go.

AB - This paper reports on a summer course titled “The Political Secretariat” referring to the personal office of top elected political leaders like ministers or mayors and their top administrative advisor (Permanent Secretary or City Manager). Such offices are, in accordance with the Danish tradition, staffed with permanent civil servants rather than politically appointed persons. The aim of the course is to train the students in servicing the political and administrative top leaders of a politically led organization that is exposed to daily attention from the public, media and opposition. The course runs for four weeks in august. In those four weeks, the work in a specific political secretariat is simulated covering three ministries and one local government: Ministry of Higher Education and Science, Ministry of Finance, The City of Odense and finally Ministry of Education. Cases were developed in close cooperation with the ministries and the mayor’s office. Besides training students to work under pressure, to write short and precise memos, to work in groups as well as on their own, to assess the political aspects of an issue, the course had some rather positive side effects in terms of student motivation and involvement, not only in the course as such but probably also as far as the rest of their university studies go.

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Mouritzen PE. How to Teach Political Advice: Bringing the Daily Life of the Minister into the Classroom. 2014. Paper presented at 72nd Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, United States.