How do we get to know a new word? The social establishment of novel words as part of their creation

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Abstract

This article shows how people dynamically make sense of new words in social encounters, which is an unorthodox perspective on neologism. The article relies on inductive analysis of a case study of mundane conversation, in which a new term is introduced. The data is collected following the integrational principle of first-order perspective (Harris 1996, Davis 2001). Following Vygotsky (1978), Wertch & Stone (1978), and Gutiérrez (2008) this article will argue that the intersubjective sense-making process of the new word can be viewed as social microgenesis, thus showing aspects of reflection. This leads to a discussion of the relation between social microgenesis and ‘knowing’ the word (i.e. conventionalization), and thus the relation between first-order languaging and second-order language construct (Thibault 2011).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCreativity and Continuity : Perspectives on the Dynamics of Language Conventionalisation
EditorsDorthe Duncker, Bettina Perregaard
Place of PublicationCopenhagen
PublisherU Press
Publication date15. Mar 2017
Pages307-331
Chapter13
ISBN (Print)978-87-93060-39-5
ISBN (Electronic)9788793060401
Publication statusPublished - 15. Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Social Microgenesis, Integrationism, Neologism, Distributed Language and Cognition

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