How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport

Daniel Wüstner, Katarzyna Solanko

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Abstract

Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalB B A - Biomembranes
Volume1848
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)1908-26
ISSN0005-2736
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Sterols
Cholesterol
Lipids
Proteins
Cells
Ergosterol
Cell membranes
Membrane Lipids
Fungi
Chemical properties
Lipoproteins
Solubility
Cell Membrane
Fluxes
Membranes
Molecules
Water
Monitoring

Cite this

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title = "How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport",
abstract = "Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.",
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How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport. / Wüstner, Daniel; Solanko, Katarzyna.

In: B B A - Biomembranes, Vol. 1848, No. 9, 2015, p. 1908-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport

AU - Wüstner, Daniel

AU - Solanko, Katarzyna

N1 - Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

AB - Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

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VL - 1848

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