Household crowding and psychosocial health among Inuit in Greenland

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Poor housing conditions experienced by many Indigenous peoples threaten their health and well-being. This study examines whether household crowding is associated with poorer psychosocial health among Greenlanders, and the mediating role of social support. It also assesses whether Inuit men and women are differently influenced by their housing conditions.

METHODS: Data on more than 3,000 Inuit aged 18 years and older are from the Inuit health in transition Greenland survey. Associations between household crowding and composition, and mental well-being and binge drinking were examined using logistic regression models, adjusting for individuals' characteristics.

RESULTS: Household crowding was associated with poorer mental well-being. Binge drinking was more common among people living in households without children. These effects were more important for women than for men. The association between household crowding and mental well-being was significantly mediated by social support. This suggests that having a strong social network may buffer the deleterious impacts of household crowding.

CONCLUSIONS: Targeting housing conditions and fostering social support as part of population health interventions might contribute to improving psychosocial health and well-being in Greenland.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health (Print Edition)
Volume59
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)739-748
ISSN1661-8556
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9. Sep 2014

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Greenland
Crowding
Health
Logistic Models
Health Transition
Inuits
Foster Home Care
Population

Cite this

@article{9f4a4031c0a642d48acd72eee3dba20b,
title = "Household crowding and psychosocial health among Inuit in Greenland",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Poor housing conditions experienced by many Indigenous peoples threaten their health and well-being. This study examines whether household crowding is associated with poorer psychosocial health among Greenlanders, and the mediating role of social support. It also assesses whether Inuit men and women are differently influenced by their housing conditions.METHODS: Data on more than 3,000 Inuit aged 18 years and older are from the Inuit health in transition Greenland survey. Associations between household crowding and composition, and mental well-being and binge drinking were examined using logistic regression models, adjusting for individuals' characteristics.RESULTS: Household crowding was associated with poorer mental well-being. Binge drinking was more common among people living in households without children. These effects were more important for women than for men. The association between household crowding and mental well-being was significantly mediated by social support. This suggests that having a strong social network may buffer the deleterious impacts of household crowding.CONCLUSIONS: Targeting housing conditions and fostering social support as part of population health interventions might contribute to improving psychosocial health and well-being in Greenland.",
author = "Myl{\`e}ne Riva and Larsen, {Christina Viskum Lytken} and Peter Bjerregaard",
year = "2014",
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doi = "10.1007/s00038-014-0599-x",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "739--748",
journal = "International Journal of Public Health",
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Household crowding and psychosocial health among Inuit in Greenland. / Riva, Mylène; Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken; Bjerregaard, Peter.

In: International Journal of Public Health (Print Edition), Vol. 59, No. 5, 09.09.2014, p. 739-748.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Household crowding and psychosocial health among Inuit in Greenland

AU - Riva, Mylène

AU - Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken

AU - Bjerregaard, Peter

PY - 2014/9/9

Y1 - 2014/9/9

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Poor housing conditions experienced by many Indigenous peoples threaten their health and well-being. This study examines whether household crowding is associated with poorer psychosocial health among Greenlanders, and the mediating role of social support. It also assesses whether Inuit men and women are differently influenced by their housing conditions.METHODS: Data on more than 3,000 Inuit aged 18 years and older are from the Inuit health in transition Greenland survey. Associations between household crowding and composition, and mental well-being and binge drinking were examined using logistic regression models, adjusting for individuals' characteristics.RESULTS: Household crowding was associated with poorer mental well-being. Binge drinking was more common among people living in households without children. These effects were more important for women than for men. The association between household crowding and mental well-being was significantly mediated by social support. This suggests that having a strong social network may buffer the deleterious impacts of household crowding.CONCLUSIONS: Targeting housing conditions and fostering social support as part of population health interventions might contribute to improving psychosocial health and well-being in Greenland.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Poor housing conditions experienced by many Indigenous peoples threaten their health and well-being. This study examines whether household crowding is associated with poorer psychosocial health among Greenlanders, and the mediating role of social support. It also assesses whether Inuit men and women are differently influenced by their housing conditions.METHODS: Data on more than 3,000 Inuit aged 18 years and older are from the Inuit health in transition Greenland survey. Associations between household crowding and composition, and mental well-being and binge drinking were examined using logistic regression models, adjusting for individuals' characteristics.RESULTS: Household crowding was associated with poorer mental well-being. Binge drinking was more common among people living in households without children. These effects were more important for women than for men. The association between household crowding and mental well-being was significantly mediated by social support. This suggests that having a strong social network may buffer the deleterious impacts of household crowding.CONCLUSIONS: Targeting housing conditions and fostering social support as part of population health interventions might contribute to improving psychosocial health and well-being in Greenland.

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JO - International Journal of Public Health

JF - International Journal of Public Health

SN - 1661-8556

IS - 5

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