Honesty and Inquiry

W.K. Clifford’s ethics of belief

Nikolaj Nottelmann*, Patrick Fessenbecker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

W.K. Clifford is widely known for his emphatic motto that it is wrong, always everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. In fact, that dictum and Clifford’s condemnation of a scheming self-deceptive shipowner sum up how his ethics of belief is most often remembered and how it has been subsequently interpreted. In contrast to other recent interpretations, we argue that the motto is misleading as a guide to Clifford’s position. It is best understood as essentially a rhetorical flourish. Moreover, in important ways the scheming shipowner is not stereotypical of the kind of believer Clifford thought blameworthy. A careful study of Clifford’s various writings on the ethics of belief finally reveals him not to be an evidentialist in the Humean tradition. Rather, inspired by Charles Darwin’s work in moral psychology, he applied an evolutionary-functional virtue ethics to the doxastic realm. This perspective allows a fruitful examination of his engagement with contemporaries like Matthew Arnold. It also allows us to recognize him as a predecessor to modern attributionist accounts of blameworthy belief.

William Kingdon Clifford, Charles Darwin, Matthew Arnold, ethics of belief, ethics of religion
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal for the History of Philosophy
ISSN0960-8788
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29. Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Ethics of Belief
Honesty
Motto
Charles Darwin
Matthew Arnold
Moral Psychology
Virtue Ethics
Flourish
Rhetoric
Condemnation
Believer
Religion
Evolutionary
Dictum
Emphatics
David Hume

Keywords

  • Charles Darwin
  • Matthew Arnold
  • William Kingdon Clifford
  • ethics of belief
  • ethics of religion

Cite this

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abstract = "W.K. Clifford is widely known for his emphatic motto that it is wrong, always everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. In fact, that dictum and Clifford’s condemnation of a scheming self-deceptive shipowner sum up how his ethics of belief is most often remembered and how it has been subsequently interpreted. In contrast to other recent interpretations, we argue that the motto is misleading as a guide to Clifford’s position. It is best understood as essentially a rhetorical flourish. Moreover, in important ways the scheming shipowner is not stereotypical of the kind of believer Clifford thought blameworthy. A careful study of Clifford’s various writings on the ethics of belief finally reveals him not to be an evidentialist in the Humean tradition. Rather, inspired by Charles Darwin’s work in moral psychology, he applied an evolutionary-functional virtue ethics to the doxastic realm. This perspective allows a fruitful examination of his engagement with contemporaries like Matthew Arnold. It also allows us to recognize him as a predecessor to modern attributionist accounts of blameworthy belief.William Kingdon Clifford, Charles Darwin, Matthew Arnold, ethics of belief, ethics of religion",
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Honesty and Inquiry : W.K. Clifford’s ethics of belief. / Nottelmann, Nikolaj; Fessenbecker, Patrick.

In: British Journal for the History of Philosophy, 29.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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