High temperature requirement A1 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the cerebrospinal fluid; a potential marker of conversion from relapsing-remitting to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Predictive and prognostic biomarkers for multiple sclerosis (MS) remain a significant gap in MS diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Currently, there are no timely markers to diagnose the transition to secondary progressive MS (SPMS).

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the discriminatory potential of the High temperature requirement serine protease (HTRA1)/Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ratio in distinguishing relapsing-remitting (RRMS) patients from SPMS patients.

METHODS: The MIF and HTRA1 CSF levels were determined using ELISA in healthy controls (n = 23), RRMS patients before (n = 22) and after 1 year of dimethyl fumarate treatment (n = 11), as well as in SPMS patients before (n = 11) and after 2 years of mitoxantrone treatment (n = 7). The ability of the HTRA1/MIF ratio to discriminate the different groups was determined using receiver operating curve (ROC) analyses.

RESULTS: The ratio was significantly increased in treatment naïve RRMS patients while decreased again in SPMS patients at baseline. Systemic administrated disease modifying treatment (DMT) only significantly affected the ratio in RRMS patients. ROC analysis demonstrated that the ratio could discriminate treatment naïve RRMS patients from SPMS patients with 91% sensitivity and 100% specificity.

CONCLUSION: The HTRA1/MIF ratio is a strong candidate as a MS biomarker for SPMS conversion.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume457
Pages (from-to)122888
ISSN0022-510X
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14. Jan 2024

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Copyright © 2024 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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