High Readmission Rates and Mental Distress 1 yr After Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation or Atrial Flutter: A NATIONWIDE SURVEY

Signe Stelling Risom, Ann Dorthe Zwisler, Lau Caspar Thygesen, Jesper Hastrup Svendsen, Selina Kikkenborg Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: Today, catheter ablation is a widely used treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL). Knowledge on long-term patient-reported outcomes and readmissions is lacking and is warranted to plan optimal follow-up care. Objectives were to describe patient-reported outcomes including perceived health, quality of life, anxiety, depression, and physical activity compared with an age- and sex-matched reference population without longstanding disease; readmissions and mortality; and factors associated with suboptimal patient-reported outcomes. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey mailed to 627 adults 6 to 12 mo after ablation for AF or AFL including; Short Form-36 (SF-36), HeartQoL, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and questions about physical activity. Readmission rates and mortality were obtained and regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Comparing the patient group (response rate: 74%, n = 462) with an age- and sex-matched reference population with no long-lasting disease, differences were found in all subscales of SF-36 and leisure-time physical activity in favor of the reference group (P < .001). Within 1 yr, 411 patients (59%) were readmitted and the total number of readmissions was 1167. Altogether, 227 (33%) patients were electively readmitted and 330 (48%) were acutely readmitted. Ten patients (1.4%) died. Age > 59 yr, female sex, high comorbidity, and readmission were associated with low physical health, low perceived health, and low quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated for AF or AFL experienced decreased mental and physical health and high readmission rates 6 to 12 mo following catheter ablation. Closer multidisciplinary follow-up or cardiac rehabilitation after ablation for AF or AFL may be needed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention
Volume39
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)33-38
ISSN1932-7501
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Jan 2019

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Catheter Ablation
Exercise
Health
Quality of Life
Depression
Leisure Activities
Population
Comorbidity
Mental Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Cardiac Rehabilitation

Keywords

  • atrial fibrillation
  • atrial flutter
  • readmission

Cite this

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title = "High Readmission Rates and Mental Distress 1 yr After Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation or Atrial Flutter: A NATIONWIDE SURVEY",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Today, catheter ablation is a widely used treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL). Knowledge on long-term patient-reported outcomes and readmissions is lacking and is warranted to plan optimal follow-up care. Objectives were to describe patient-reported outcomes including perceived health, quality of life, anxiety, depression, and physical activity compared with an age- and sex-matched reference population without longstanding disease; readmissions and mortality; and factors associated with suboptimal patient-reported outcomes. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey mailed to 627 adults 6 to 12 mo after ablation for AF or AFL including; Short Form-36 (SF-36), HeartQoL, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and questions about physical activity. Readmission rates and mortality were obtained and regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Comparing the patient group (response rate: 74{\%}, n = 462) with an age- and sex-matched reference population with no long-lasting disease, differences were found in all subscales of SF-36 and leisure-time physical activity in favor of the reference group (P < .001). Within 1 yr, 411 patients (59{\%}) were readmitted and the total number of readmissions was 1167. Altogether, 227 (33{\%}) patients were electively readmitted and 330 (48{\%}) were acutely readmitted. Ten patients (1.4{\%}) died. Age > 59 yr, female sex, high comorbidity, and readmission were associated with low physical health, low perceived health, and low quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated for AF or AFL experienced decreased mental and physical health and high readmission rates 6 to 12 mo following catheter ablation. Closer multidisciplinary follow-up or cardiac rehabilitation after ablation for AF or AFL may be needed.",
keywords = "atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, readmission",
author = "Risom, {Signe Stelling} and Zwisler, {Ann Dorthe} and Thygesen, {Lau Caspar} and Svendsen, {Jesper Hastrup} and Berg, {Selina Kikkenborg}",
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High Readmission Rates and Mental Distress 1 yr After Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation or Atrial Flutter : A NATIONWIDE SURVEY. / Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg.

In: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 33-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - High Readmission Rates and Mental Distress 1 yr After Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation or Atrial Flutter

T2 - A NATIONWIDE SURVEY

AU - Risom, Signe Stelling

AU - Zwisler, Ann Dorthe

AU - Thygesen, Lau Caspar

AU - Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

AU - Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - PURPOSE: Today, catheter ablation is a widely used treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL). Knowledge on long-term patient-reported outcomes and readmissions is lacking and is warranted to plan optimal follow-up care. Objectives were to describe patient-reported outcomes including perceived health, quality of life, anxiety, depression, and physical activity compared with an age- and sex-matched reference population without longstanding disease; readmissions and mortality; and factors associated with suboptimal patient-reported outcomes. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey mailed to 627 adults 6 to 12 mo after ablation for AF or AFL including; Short Form-36 (SF-36), HeartQoL, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and questions about physical activity. Readmission rates and mortality were obtained and regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Comparing the patient group (response rate: 74%, n = 462) with an age- and sex-matched reference population with no long-lasting disease, differences were found in all subscales of SF-36 and leisure-time physical activity in favor of the reference group (P < .001). Within 1 yr, 411 patients (59%) were readmitted and the total number of readmissions was 1167. Altogether, 227 (33%) patients were electively readmitted and 330 (48%) were acutely readmitted. Ten patients (1.4%) died. Age > 59 yr, female sex, high comorbidity, and readmission were associated with low physical health, low perceived health, and low quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated for AF or AFL experienced decreased mental and physical health and high readmission rates 6 to 12 mo following catheter ablation. Closer multidisciplinary follow-up or cardiac rehabilitation after ablation for AF or AFL may be needed.

AB - PURPOSE: Today, catheter ablation is a widely used treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL). Knowledge on long-term patient-reported outcomes and readmissions is lacking and is warranted to plan optimal follow-up care. Objectives were to describe patient-reported outcomes including perceived health, quality of life, anxiety, depression, and physical activity compared with an age- and sex-matched reference population without longstanding disease; readmissions and mortality; and factors associated with suboptimal patient-reported outcomes. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey mailed to 627 adults 6 to 12 mo after ablation for AF or AFL including; Short Form-36 (SF-36), HeartQoL, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and questions about physical activity. Readmission rates and mortality were obtained and regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Comparing the patient group (response rate: 74%, n = 462) with an age- and sex-matched reference population with no long-lasting disease, differences were found in all subscales of SF-36 and leisure-time physical activity in favor of the reference group (P < .001). Within 1 yr, 411 patients (59%) were readmitted and the total number of readmissions was 1167. Altogether, 227 (33%) patients were electively readmitted and 330 (48%) were acutely readmitted. Ten patients (1.4%) died. Age > 59 yr, female sex, high comorbidity, and readmission were associated with low physical health, low perceived health, and low quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated for AF or AFL experienced decreased mental and physical health and high readmission rates 6 to 12 mo following catheter ablation. Closer multidisciplinary follow-up or cardiac rehabilitation after ablation for AF or AFL may be needed.

KW - atrial fibrillation

KW - atrial flutter

KW - readmission

U2 - 10.1097/HCR.0000000000000395

DO - 10.1097/HCR.0000000000000395

M3 - Review

C2 - 30586112

AN - SCOPUS:85059125887

VL - 39

SP - 33

EP - 38

JO - Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention

JF - Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention

SN - 1932-7501

IS - 1

ER -