Heritability of the Number of Teeth in Middle-Aged and Older Danish Twins

Y Kurushima, K Silventoinen, U Dokkedal, A Skytthe, L A Mucci, K Christensen, J V B Hjelmborg

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Tooth loss is a common health concern in older adults. We aimed to estimate the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the variation in the number of teeth in middle-aged and older populations using a population-based cohort of Danish twins. The study included 5,269 Danish middle-aged or older twins who provided data on the number of teeth at baseline by structured interviews. The data were analyzed using univariate liability threshold modeling, stratified by sex and age, to estimate familial risk of tooth loss as well as estimates of heritability. In the whole cohorts, 23% of participants were edentate and 53% had retained 20 or more teeth. A statistical model including additive genetic factors and environmental factors partly shared by co-twins and partly unique to each individual twin gave the best statistical fit for the number of teeth in both age categories as well as in men and women. Overall, additive genetic factors explained 36% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23% to 49%), common environmental factors 20% (95% CI: 9% to 31%), and unique environmental factors 44% (95% CI: 40% to 48%) of the total variation of the number of teeth. This study indicates that a substantial part of the variation in tooth loss is explained by genetic as well as environmental factors shared by co-twins. Our results implied that family background importantly affects tooth loss in both the middle-aged and the older populations. Family history is thus an important factor to take into account in dental health care.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume96
Issue number13
Pages (from-to)1513-1517
ISSN0022-0345
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Tooth Loss
Confidence Intervals
Population
Dental Care
Statistical Models
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Health

Keywords

  • Behavioral science
  • Biostatistics
  • Epidemiology
  • Geriatric dentistry
  • Population genetics
  • Twin study

Cite this

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title = "Heritability of the Number of Teeth in Middle-Aged and Older Danish Twins",
abstract = "Tooth loss is a common health concern in older adults. We aimed to estimate the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the variation in the number of teeth in middle-aged and older populations using a population-based cohort of Danish twins. The study included 5,269 Danish middle-aged or older twins who provided data on the number of teeth at baseline by structured interviews. The data were analyzed using univariate liability threshold modeling, stratified by sex and age, to estimate familial risk of tooth loss as well as estimates of heritability. In the whole cohorts, 23{\%} of participants were edentate and 53{\%} had retained 20 or more teeth. A statistical model including additive genetic factors and environmental factors partly shared by co-twins and partly unique to each individual twin gave the best statistical fit for the number of teeth in both age categories as well as in men and women. Overall, additive genetic factors explained 36{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 23{\%} to 49{\%}), common environmental factors 20{\%} (95{\%} CI: 9{\%} to 31{\%}), and unique environmental factors 44{\%} (95{\%} CI: 40{\%} to 48{\%}) of the total variation of the number of teeth. This study indicates that a substantial part of the variation in tooth loss is explained by genetic as well as environmental factors shared by co-twins. Our results implied that family background importantly affects tooth loss in both the middle-aged and the older populations. Family history is thus an important factor to take into account in dental health care.",
keywords = "Behavioral science, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Geriatric dentistry, Population genetics, Twin study",
author = "Y Kurushima and K Silventoinen and U Dokkedal and A Skytthe and Mucci, {L A} and K Christensen and Hjelmborg, {J V B}",
year = "2017",
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language = "English",
volume = "96",
pages = "1513--1517",
journal = "Journal of Dental Research",
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Heritability of the Number of Teeth in Middle-Aged and Older Danish Twins. / Kurushima, Y; Silventoinen, K; Dokkedal, U; Skytthe, A; Mucci, L A; Christensen, K; Hjelmborg, J V B.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 96, No. 13, 2017, p. 1513-1517.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heritability of the Number of Teeth in Middle-Aged and Older Danish Twins

AU - Kurushima, Y

AU - Silventoinen, K

AU - Dokkedal, U

AU - Skytthe, A

AU - Mucci, L A

AU - Christensen, K

AU - Hjelmborg, J V B

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Tooth loss is a common health concern in older adults. We aimed to estimate the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the variation in the number of teeth in middle-aged and older populations using a population-based cohort of Danish twins. The study included 5,269 Danish middle-aged or older twins who provided data on the number of teeth at baseline by structured interviews. The data were analyzed using univariate liability threshold modeling, stratified by sex and age, to estimate familial risk of tooth loss as well as estimates of heritability. In the whole cohorts, 23% of participants were edentate and 53% had retained 20 or more teeth. A statistical model including additive genetic factors and environmental factors partly shared by co-twins and partly unique to each individual twin gave the best statistical fit for the number of teeth in both age categories as well as in men and women. Overall, additive genetic factors explained 36% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23% to 49%), common environmental factors 20% (95% CI: 9% to 31%), and unique environmental factors 44% (95% CI: 40% to 48%) of the total variation of the number of teeth. This study indicates that a substantial part of the variation in tooth loss is explained by genetic as well as environmental factors shared by co-twins. Our results implied that family background importantly affects tooth loss in both the middle-aged and the older populations. Family history is thus an important factor to take into account in dental health care.

AB - Tooth loss is a common health concern in older adults. We aimed to estimate the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the variation in the number of teeth in middle-aged and older populations using a population-based cohort of Danish twins. The study included 5,269 Danish middle-aged or older twins who provided data on the number of teeth at baseline by structured interviews. The data were analyzed using univariate liability threshold modeling, stratified by sex and age, to estimate familial risk of tooth loss as well as estimates of heritability. In the whole cohorts, 23% of participants were edentate and 53% had retained 20 or more teeth. A statistical model including additive genetic factors and environmental factors partly shared by co-twins and partly unique to each individual twin gave the best statistical fit for the number of teeth in both age categories as well as in men and women. Overall, additive genetic factors explained 36% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23% to 49%), common environmental factors 20% (95% CI: 9% to 31%), and unique environmental factors 44% (95% CI: 40% to 48%) of the total variation of the number of teeth. This study indicates that a substantial part of the variation in tooth loss is explained by genetic as well as environmental factors shared by co-twins. Our results implied that family background importantly affects tooth loss in both the middle-aged and the older populations. Family history is thus an important factor to take into account in dental health care.

KW - Behavioral science

KW - Biostatistics

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Geriatric dentistry

KW - Population genetics

KW - Twin study

U2 - 10.1177/0022034517724782

DO - 10.1177/0022034517724782

M3 - Journal article

VL - 96

SP - 1513

EP - 1517

JO - Journal of Dental Research

JF - Journal of Dental Research

SN - 0022-0345

IS - 13

ER -