Guided tinkering as a design for learning programming

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In Chapter 1, it was pointed out that some level of programming skills is necessary for competent agency in a networked world, for all the senses of ‘network’ that involve ICT. Partly because such skills allow people themselves to quickly and flexibly adjust the digital resources relied upon in everyday life, instead of requiring outside expert assistance. Partly because understanding the ‘black box’ of programming supplies a solid domain basis for balanced reflections on the appropriate integration of digital solutions in the practices we partake in. As digital solutions become increasingly integrated in our school, work and leisure practices, the need for these skills becomes much more widespread within the general public. They are no longer only demanded of experts and in specific job functions; to some extent at least they are required of people in general (Wing, 2008; Grover and Pea, 2013; Vee, 2013). This argument was further developed in Chapter 9 which presented an analysis of Computational Literacy which comprises a much wider set of skills than the ones narrowly focussed on development of computer programs. Computational Literacy was analysed as a multi-layered set of skills, building at the lowest level on computational thinking and aiming at the highest level at computational participation. The claim was, first, that the computational thinking skills of problem decomposition, pattern recognition, pattern generalisation, abstraction and the design of step-by-step solutions (algorithms) are useful – often necessary – within all academic fields. Second, it was argued that programming tasks provide a rigorous method for developing these skills and showcasing their usefulness.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDesigning for Learning in a Networked World
EditorsNina Bonderup Dohn
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Publication date2018
Edition1.
Pages177-196
Chapter10
ISBN (Print)978-0-8153-7843-3
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-351-23235-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
SeriesRoutledge Research in Education

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programming
literacy
expert
learning
pattern recognition
data processing program
abstraction
everyday life
assistance
participation
resources
school

Cite this

Bjerre, A., & Dohn, N. B. (2018). Guided tinkering as a design for learning programming. In N. B. Dohn (Ed.), Designing for Learning in a Networked World (1. ed., pp. 177-196). London: Routledge. Routledge Research in Education https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351232357-10
Bjerre, Anne ; Dohn, Nina Bonderup. / Guided tinkering as a design for learning programming. Designing for Learning in a Networked World. editor / Nina Bonderup Dohn. 1. ed. London : Routledge, 2018. pp. 177-196 (Routledge Research in Education).
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Bjerre, A & Dohn, NB 2018, Guided tinkering as a design for learning programming. in NB Dohn (ed.), Designing for Learning in a Networked World. 1. edn, Routledge, London, Routledge Research in Education, pp. 177-196. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351232357-10

Guided tinkering as a design for learning programming. / Bjerre, Anne; Dohn, Nina Bonderup.

Designing for Learning in a Networked World. ed. / Nina Bonderup Dohn. 1. ed. London : Routledge, 2018. p. 177-196 (Routledge Research in Education).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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AB - In Chapter 1, it was pointed out that some level of programming skills is necessary for competent agency in a networked world, for all the senses of ‘network’ that involve ICT. Partly because such skills allow people themselves to quickly and flexibly adjust the digital resources relied upon in everyday life, instead of requiring outside expert assistance. Partly because understanding the ‘black box’ of programming supplies a solid domain basis for balanced reflections on the appropriate integration of digital solutions in the practices we partake in. As digital solutions become increasingly integrated in our school, work and leisure practices, the need for these skills becomes much more widespread within the general public. They are no longer only demanded of experts and in specific job functions; to some extent at least they are required of people in general (Wing, 2008; Grover and Pea, 2013; Vee, 2013). This argument was further developed in Chapter 9 which presented an analysis of Computational Literacy which comprises a much wider set of skills than the ones narrowly focussed on development of computer programs. Computational Literacy was analysed as a multi-layered set of skills, building at the lowest level on computational thinking and aiming at the highest level at computational participation. The claim was, first, that the computational thinking skills of problem decomposition, pattern recognition, pattern generalisation, abstraction and the design of step-by-step solutions (algorithms) are useful – often necessary – within all academic fields. Second, it was argued that programming tasks provide a rigorous method for developing these skills and showcasing their usefulness.

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Bjerre A, Dohn NB. Guided tinkering as a design for learning programming. In Dohn NB, editor, Designing for Learning in a Networked World. 1. ed. London: Routledge. 2018. p. 177-196. (Routledge Research in Education). https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351232357-10