Griseofulvin and fluvoxamine interactions with the metabolism of theophylline

Birgitte Buur Rasmussen*, Unni Jeppesen, David Gaist, Kim Brøsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Theophylline is predominantly metabolized by cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2). A possible interaction between griseofulvin and theophylline was reported to our laboratory, which led us to form the hypothesis that griseofulvin induces the metabolism of theophylline. One purpose of this study was to investigate this hypothesis. The study was carried out as a randomized crossover study of 12 healthy volunteers. In period A of the study, each volunteer received a single dose of 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine orally. In period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine, 50 mg for 1 day and 100 mg for 6 days, and on day 4, the subjects ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine. Fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, and period B was included as a positive control. In period C, the subjects took 500 mg griseofulvin for 9 days; on day 8 the subjects again ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenedime. Theophylline and its metabolites (1-methyluric acid [1MU], 3-methylxanthine [3MX], and 1,3-dimethyluric acid [13DMU]) in plasma and urine were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. During fluvoxamine intake, the median of the total clearance of theophylline decreased from 80 ml/min to 24 ml/min, and the half-life increased from 6.6 to 22 h. The partial formation clearances of the metabolites decreased from 17 to 1.7 ml/min, from 8.9 to 0.9 ml/min, and from 21 to 6.8 ml/min for 1MU, 3MX, and 13DMU, respectively. The results confirm that assessment of theophylline metabolism indeed serves as a biomarker for CYP1A2. During griseofulvin ingestion, the median of the total and partial clearances of theophylline were 84 ml/min, 22 ml/min (1MU), 9.4 ml/min (3MX), and 25 ml/min (13DMU). The half-life decreased significantly from 6.6 to 5.7 h. The increase in partial formation clearances of 1MU and 13DMU, but not of 3MX, were statistically significant. The increase in the total clearance reached only borderline significance. In four subjects a marked induction was seen for all pharmacokinetic parameters, suggesting that the susceptibility to induction is more pronounced in some subjects. This susceptibility could theoretically be explained by a polymorphism in the inducibility of the gene coding for the CYP1A2 enzyme.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTherapeutic Drug Monitoring
Volume19
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)56-62
Number of pages7
ISSN0163-4356
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Feb 1997

Fingerprint

Fluvoxamine
Griseofulvin
Cytochromes
Aminophylline
Half-Life
Cross-Over Studies
Volunteers
Pharmacokinetics
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Urine
1-methyluric acid
3-methylxanthine

Keywords

  • CYP1A2
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Griseofulvin
  • Interaction
  • Theophylline

Cite this

@article{bb4583d4e01c42b39b28a6da8b323468,
title = "Griseofulvin and fluvoxamine interactions with the metabolism of theophylline",
abstract = "Theophylline is predominantly metabolized by cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2). A possible interaction between griseofulvin and theophylline was reported to our laboratory, which led us to form the hypothesis that griseofulvin induces the metabolism of theophylline. One purpose of this study was to investigate this hypothesis. The study was carried out as a randomized crossover study of 12 healthy volunteers. In period A of the study, each volunteer received a single dose of 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine orally. In period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine, 50 mg for 1 day and 100 mg for 6 days, and on day 4, the subjects ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine. Fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, and period B was included as a positive control. In period C, the subjects took 500 mg griseofulvin for 9 days; on day 8 the subjects again ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenedime. Theophylline and its metabolites (1-methyluric acid [1MU], 3-methylxanthine [3MX], and 1,3-dimethyluric acid [13DMU]) in plasma and urine were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. During fluvoxamine intake, the median of the total clearance of theophylline decreased from 80 ml/min to 24 ml/min, and the half-life increased from 6.6 to 22 h. The partial formation clearances of the metabolites decreased from 17 to 1.7 ml/min, from 8.9 to 0.9 ml/min, and from 21 to 6.8 ml/min for 1MU, 3MX, and 13DMU, respectively. The results confirm that assessment of theophylline metabolism indeed serves as a biomarker for CYP1A2. During griseofulvin ingestion, the median of the total and partial clearances of theophylline were 84 ml/min, 22 ml/min (1MU), 9.4 ml/min (3MX), and 25 ml/min (13DMU). The half-life decreased significantly from 6.6 to 5.7 h. The increase in partial formation clearances of 1MU and 13DMU, but not of 3MX, were statistically significant. The increase in the total clearance reached only borderline significance. In four subjects a marked induction was seen for all pharmacokinetic parameters, suggesting that the susceptibility to induction is more pronounced in some subjects. This susceptibility could theoretically be explained by a polymorphism in the inducibility of the gene coding for the CYP1A2 enzyme.",
keywords = "CYP1A2, Fluvoxamine, Griseofulvin, Interaction, Theophylline",
author = "Rasmussen, {Birgitte Buur} and Unni Jeppesen and David Gaist and Kim Br{\o}sen",
year = "1997",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00007691-199702000-00010",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "56--62",
journal = "Therapeutic Drug Monitoring",
issn = "0163-4356",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

Griseofulvin and fluvoxamine interactions with the metabolism of theophylline. / Rasmussen, Birgitte Buur; Jeppesen, Unni; Gaist, David; Brøsen, Kim.

In: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.02.1997, p. 56-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Griseofulvin and fluvoxamine interactions with the metabolism of theophylline

AU - Rasmussen, Birgitte Buur

AU - Jeppesen, Unni

AU - Gaist, David

AU - Brøsen, Kim

PY - 1997/2/1

Y1 - 1997/2/1

N2 - Theophylline is predominantly metabolized by cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2). A possible interaction between griseofulvin and theophylline was reported to our laboratory, which led us to form the hypothesis that griseofulvin induces the metabolism of theophylline. One purpose of this study was to investigate this hypothesis. The study was carried out as a randomized crossover study of 12 healthy volunteers. In period A of the study, each volunteer received a single dose of 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine orally. In period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine, 50 mg for 1 day and 100 mg for 6 days, and on day 4, the subjects ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine. Fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, and period B was included as a positive control. In period C, the subjects took 500 mg griseofulvin for 9 days; on day 8 the subjects again ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenedime. Theophylline and its metabolites (1-methyluric acid [1MU], 3-methylxanthine [3MX], and 1,3-dimethyluric acid [13DMU]) in plasma and urine were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. During fluvoxamine intake, the median of the total clearance of theophylline decreased from 80 ml/min to 24 ml/min, and the half-life increased from 6.6 to 22 h. The partial formation clearances of the metabolites decreased from 17 to 1.7 ml/min, from 8.9 to 0.9 ml/min, and from 21 to 6.8 ml/min for 1MU, 3MX, and 13DMU, respectively. The results confirm that assessment of theophylline metabolism indeed serves as a biomarker for CYP1A2. During griseofulvin ingestion, the median of the total and partial clearances of theophylline were 84 ml/min, 22 ml/min (1MU), 9.4 ml/min (3MX), and 25 ml/min (13DMU). The half-life decreased significantly from 6.6 to 5.7 h. The increase in partial formation clearances of 1MU and 13DMU, but not of 3MX, were statistically significant. The increase in the total clearance reached only borderline significance. In four subjects a marked induction was seen for all pharmacokinetic parameters, suggesting that the susceptibility to induction is more pronounced in some subjects. This susceptibility could theoretically be explained by a polymorphism in the inducibility of the gene coding for the CYP1A2 enzyme.

AB - Theophylline is predominantly metabolized by cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2). A possible interaction between griseofulvin and theophylline was reported to our laboratory, which led us to form the hypothesis that griseofulvin induces the metabolism of theophylline. One purpose of this study was to investigate this hypothesis. The study was carried out as a randomized crossover study of 12 healthy volunteers. In period A of the study, each volunteer received a single dose of 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine orally. In period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine, 50 mg for 1 day and 100 mg for 6 days, and on day 4, the subjects ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenediamine. Fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, and period B was included as a positive control. In period C, the subjects took 500 mg griseofulvin for 9 days; on day 8 the subjects again ingested 300 mg theophylline ethylenedime. Theophylline and its metabolites (1-methyluric acid [1MU], 3-methylxanthine [3MX], and 1,3-dimethyluric acid [13DMU]) in plasma and urine were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. During fluvoxamine intake, the median of the total clearance of theophylline decreased from 80 ml/min to 24 ml/min, and the half-life increased from 6.6 to 22 h. The partial formation clearances of the metabolites decreased from 17 to 1.7 ml/min, from 8.9 to 0.9 ml/min, and from 21 to 6.8 ml/min for 1MU, 3MX, and 13DMU, respectively. The results confirm that assessment of theophylline metabolism indeed serves as a biomarker for CYP1A2. During griseofulvin ingestion, the median of the total and partial clearances of theophylline were 84 ml/min, 22 ml/min (1MU), 9.4 ml/min (3MX), and 25 ml/min (13DMU). The half-life decreased significantly from 6.6 to 5.7 h. The increase in partial formation clearances of 1MU and 13DMU, but not of 3MX, were statistically significant. The increase in the total clearance reached only borderline significance. In four subjects a marked induction was seen for all pharmacokinetic parameters, suggesting that the susceptibility to induction is more pronounced in some subjects. This susceptibility could theoretically be explained by a polymorphism in the inducibility of the gene coding for the CYP1A2 enzyme.

KW - CYP1A2

KW - Fluvoxamine

KW - Griseofulvin

KW - Interaction

KW - Theophylline

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031431835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00007691-199702000-00010

DO - 10.1097/00007691-199702000-00010

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 9029748

AN - SCOPUS:0031431835

VL - 19

SP - 56

EP - 62

JO - Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

JF - Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

SN - 0163-4356

IS - 1

ER -