Fungi in Deep Subsurface Environments

Magnus Ivarsson*, Stefan Bengtson, Henrik Drake, Warren Francis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The igneous crust of the oceans and the continents represents the major part of Earth's lithosphere and has recently been recognized as a substantial, yet underexplored, microbial habitat. While prokaryotes have been the focus of most investigations, microeukaryotes have been surprisingly neglected. However, recent work acknowledges eukaryotes, and in particular fungi, as common inhabitants of the deep biosphere, including the deep igneous provinces. The fossil record of the subseafloor igneous crust, and to some extent the continental bedrock, establishes fungi or fungus-like organisms as inhabitants of deep rock since at least the Paleoproterozoic, which challenges the present notion of early fungal evolution. Additionally, deep fungi have been shown to play an important ecological role engaging in symbiosis-like relationships with prokaryotes, decomposing organic matter, and being responsible for mineral weathering and formation, thus mediating mobilization of biogeochemically important elements. In this review, we aim at covering the abundance and diversity of fungi in the various igneous rock provinces on Earth as well as describing the ecological impact of deep fungi. We further discuss what consequences recent findings might have for the understanding of the fungal distribution in extensive anoxic environments and for early fungal evolution.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Applied Microbiology
EditorsSima Sariaslani, Geoffrey Michael Gadd
Volume102
PublisherAcademic Press
Publication date2018
Pages83-116
Chapter3
ISBN (Print)978-0-12-815184-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
SeriesAdvances in Applied Microbiology
Volume102
ISSN0065-2164

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Minerals
Ecosystem

Keywords

  • Deep biosphere
  • Fungi
  • Igneous crust

Cite this

Ivarsson, M., Bengtson, S., Drake, H., & Francis, W. (2018). Fungi in Deep Subsurface Environments. In S. Sariaslani, & G. M. Gadd (Eds.), Advances in Applied Microbiology (Vol. 102, pp. 83-116). Academic Press. Advances in Applied Microbiology, Vol.. 102 https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.aambs.2017.11.001
Ivarsson, Magnus ; Bengtson, Stefan ; Drake, Henrik ; Francis, Warren. / Fungi in Deep Subsurface Environments. Advances in Applied Microbiology. editor / Sima Sariaslani ; Geoffrey Michael Gadd. Vol. 102 Academic Press, 2018. pp. 83-116 (Advances in Applied Microbiology, Vol. 102).
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Ivarsson, M, Bengtson, S, Drake, H & Francis, W 2018, Fungi in Deep Subsurface Environments. in S Sariaslani & GM Gadd (eds), Advances in Applied Microbiology. vol. 102, Academic Press, Advances in Applied Microbiology, vol. 102, pp. 83-116. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.aambs.2017.11.001

Fungi in Deep Subsurface Environments. / Ivarsson, Magnus; Bengtson, Stefan; Drake, Henrik; Francis, Warren.

Advances in Applied Microbiology. ed. / Sima Sariaslani; Geoffrey Michael Gadd. Vol. 102 Academic Press, 2018. p. 83-116 (Advances in Applied Microbiology, Vol. 102).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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Ivarsson M, Bengtson S, Drake H, Francis W. Fungi in Deep Subsurface Environments. In Sariaslani S, Gadd GM, editors, Advances in Applied Microbiology. Vol. 102. Academic Press. 2018. p. 83-116. (Advances in Applied Microbiology, Vol. 102). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.aambs.2017.11.001