Forensic psychiatric patients’ perceptions of situations associated with mechanical restraint: A qualitative interview study

Ellen B. Tingleff*, Lise Hounsgaard, Stephen K. Bradley, Frederik A Gildberg

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

To reduce the use and duration of mechanical restraint in forensic settings and ensure evidence-based patient care, we need more knowledge about patients’ subjective experiences and perceptions. The aim was to investigate forensic psychiatric patients’ perceptions of situations associated with the use of mechanical restraint and what they perceive as factors impacting the use and duration of mechanical restraint. Twenty participants were interviewed. Four themes were identified through a thematic analysis: ‘overt protest reactions’, ‘silent protest reactions’, ‘illness-related behaviour’, and ‘genuinely calm’, which together characterize patients’ perceptions of their ways of acting and reacting during mechanical restraint episodes. These themes are linked together in two patterns in the process of mechanical restraint: ‘pattern of protest’ and ‘pattern of illness’. Further research is needed to illuminate the associations between patients’ perceptions of being subjected to mechanical restraint and ways of acting and reacting through the process of mechanical restraint.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume28
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)468-479
ISSN1445-8330
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Keywords

  • coercion
  • forensic psychiatry
  • interview
  • physical restraint
  • qualitative research

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