Fish and salad consumption are inversely associated with levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in a Danish adult cohort

Peter Møller*, Annie Jensen, Mille Løhr, Louise Eriksen, Morten Grønbæk, Steffen Loft

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

This study investigated associations between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured by the formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay and intake of fish, salad, fruits, vegetables, wholegrain items, and potatoes in a cross-sectional study of 382 men and 591 women between 18 and 93 years. Intake of dietary items was obtained from questionnaires, and stratified into less than once per week, weekly or daily consumption. Intake of fish as main course was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in especially women (P < 0.001 multivariate linear regression). Intake of fish was also inversely associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.05, univariate analysis), although it was not statistically significant in analysis adjusted for lifestyle and other dietary factors. Intake of salad was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Statistically significant associations were also observed for intake of vegetables and potatoes in men, although these were weak and not robust in all statistical models. The sum the six individual dietary items was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in the strata of men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Finally, levels of DNA repair incision activity were not associated with individual food categories or the total dietary food score. In summary, consumption of health-promoting foods is associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in human PBMCs and strongest effects in the present population were ingestions of fish and salad.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis
Volume843
Pages (from-to)66-72
ISSN1383-5718
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Jul 2019

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DNA-Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase
Fishes
DNA
Linear Models
Food
Vegetables
Comet Assay
Statistical Models
Fruit
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health

Keywords

  • Biomonitoring
  • Comet assay
  • DNA repair
  • Nutrition
  • Oxidatively damaged DNA

Cite this

@article{17b79b9d48b04e23a3ecbfee94591b34,
title = "Fish and salad consumption are inversely associated with levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in a Danish adult cohort",
abstract = "This study investigated associations between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured by the formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay and intake of fish, salad, fruits, vegetables, wholegrain items, and potatoes in a cross-sectional study of 382 men and 591 women between 18 and 93 years. Intake of dietary items was obtained from questionnaires, and stratified into less than once per week, weekly or daily consumption. Intake of fish as main course was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in especially women (P < 0.001 multivariate linear regression). Intake of fish was also inversely associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.05, univariate analysis), although it was not statistically significant in analysis adjusted for lifestyle and other dietary factors. Intake of salad was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Statistically significant associations were also observed for intake of vegetables and potatoes in men, although these were weak and not robust in all statistical models. The sum the six individual dietary items was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in the strata of men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Finally, levels of DNA repair incision activity were not associated with individual food categories or the total dietary food score. In summary, consumption of health-promoting foods is associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in human PBMCs and strongest effects in the present population were ingestions of fish and salad.",
keywords = "Biomonitoring, Comet assay, DNA repair, Nutrition, Oxidatively damaged DNA",
author = "Peter M{\o}ller and Annie Jensen and Mille L{\o}hr and Louise Eriksen and Morten Gr{\o}nb{\ae}k and Steffen Loft",
year = "2019",
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day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.mrgentox.2018.11.003",
language = "English",
volume = "843",
pages = "66--72",
journal = "Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis",
issn = "1383-5718",
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}

Fish and salad consumption are inversely associated with levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in a Danish adult cohort. / Møller, Peter; Jensen, Annie; Løhr, Mille; Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Loft, Steffen.

In: Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis, Vol. 843, 01.07.2019, p. 66-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fish and salad consumption are inversely associated with levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in a Danish adult cohort

AU - Møller, Peter

AU - Jensen, Annie

AU - Løhr, Mille

AU - Eriksen, Louise

AU - Grønbæk, Morten

AU - Loft, Steffen

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - This study investigated associations between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured by the formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay and intake of fish, salad, fruits, vegetables, wholegrain items, and potatoes in a cross-sectional study of 382 men and 591 women between 18 and 93 years. Intake of dietary items was obtained from questionnaires, and stratified into less than once per week, weekly or daily consumption. Intake of fish as main course was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in especially women (P < 0.001 multivariate linear regression). Intake of fish was also inversely associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.05, univariate analysis), although it was not statistically significant in analysis adjusted for lifestyle and other dietary factors. Intake of salad was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Statistically significant associations were also observed for intake of vegetables and potatoes in men, although these were weak and not robust in all statistical models. The sum the six individual dietary items was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in the strata of men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Finally, levels of DNA repair incision activity were not associated with individual food categories or the total dietary food score. In summary, consumption of health-promoting foods is associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in human PBMCs and strongest effects in the present population were ingestions of fish and salad.

AB - This study investigated associations between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured by the formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified comet assay and intake of fish, salad, fruits, vegetables, wholegrain items, and potatoes in a cross-sectional study of 382 men and 591 women between 18 and 93 years. Intake of dietary items was obtained from questionnaires, and stratified into less than once per week, weekly or daily consumption. Intake of fish as main course was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in especially women (P < 0.001 multivariate linear regression). Intake of fish was also inversely associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.05, univariate analysis), although it was not statistically significant in analysis adjusted for lifestyle and other dietary factors. Intake of salad was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Statistically significant associations were also observed for intake of vegetables and potatoes in men, although these were weak and not robust in all statistical models. The sum the six individual dietary items was inversely associated with levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in the strata of men (P < 0.001, multivariate linear regression). Finally, levels of DNA repair incision activity were not associated with individual food categories or the total dietary food score. In summary, consumption of health-promoting foods is associated with lower levels of Fpg-sensitive sites in human PBMCs and strongest effects in the present population were ingestions of fish and salad.

KW - Biomonitoring

KW - Comet assay

KW - DNA repair

KW - Nutrition

KW - Oxidatively damaged DNA

U2 - 10.1016/j.mrgentox.2018.11.003

DO - 10.1016/j.mrgentox.2018.11.003

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31421741

AN - SCOPUS:85057131841

VL - 843

SP - 66

EP - 72

JO - Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis

JF - Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis

SN - 1383-5718

ER -