Firms’ maneuvering between institutional logics in the public sector for commercializing welfare innovations

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The article aims to explore, through a micro level focus, how individual private firm actors maneuver between institutional logics embedded in different individual public actors operating at various levels in the public sector, when making efforts towards commercializing innovative welfare solutions developed through Public Private Innovation (PPI). Institutional logics are socially constructed patterns of taken-for-granted practices and belief systems that provide actors meaning. Therefore, knowing how to handle institutional logics becomes essential for private firm actors as institutional logics embedded in public actors influence whether private firm actors are successful or not in achieving commercialization in the public market. The study is based on an in-depth case-study containing 4 PPI projects that have succeeded in commercializing their solutions in one way or another. All projects focus on developing innovative solutions to the public health care system through a joint innovation process between public and private actors, which afterwards potentially can be commercialized in the public health care market. The preliminary findings show that private firms, who succeed in commercializing interact with public actors operating at various levels in the public sector using a top-down, bottom-up or mixed approach. The top-down approach shows that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in political and managerial actors by creating legitimacy and accept from above concerning their welfare solutions. The bottom-up approach exemplify that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in actors of health professionals by generating a need for new solutions from below and by gaining access to a network of health professionals in the broader public health care market. The mixed approach demonstrates that private firms handle institutional logics by combining interaction with actors across levels in the public sector, thereby mixing top-down and bottom-up approaches. As such, the three approaches point out that private firms, when handling institutional logics, can do this by either modifying them or integrating them. Finally, some firms end up avoiding them in their efforts to commercialize PPI solutions within the Danish public health care system and focus on other markets.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2014
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event30th Annual IMP Conference - Bordeaux, France
Duration: 1. Sep 20146. Sep 2014

Conference

Conference30th Annual IMP Conference
CountryFrance
CityBordeaux
Period01/09/201406/09/2014

Cite this

@conference{ac94e50e18344d339098958fca1f8ca0,
title = "Firms’ maneuvering between institutional logics in the public sector for commercializing welfare innovations",
abstract = "The article aims to explore, through a micro level focus, how individual private firm actors maneuver between institutional logics embedded in different individual public actors operating at various levels in the public sector, when making efforts towards commercializing innovative welfare solutions developed through Public Private Innovation (PPI). Institutional logics are socially constructed patterns of taken-for-granted practices and belief systems that provide actors meaning. Therefore, knowing how to handle institutional logics becomes essential for private firm actors as institutional logics embedded in public actors influence whether private firm actors are successful or not in achieving commercialization in the public market. The study is based on an in-depth case-study containing 4 PPI projects that have succeeded in commercializing their solutions in one way or another. All projects focus on developing innovative solutions to the public health care system through a joint innovation process between public and private actors, which afterwards potentially can be commercialized in the public health care market. The preliminary findings show that private firms, who succeed in commercializing interact with public actors operating at various levels in the public sector using a top-down, bottom-up or mixed approach. The top-down approach shows that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in political and managerial actors by creating legitimacy and accept from above concerning their welfare solutions. The bottom-up approach exemplify that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in actors of health professionals by generating a need for new solutions from below and by gaining access to a network of health professionals in the broader public health care market. The mixed approach demonstrates that private firms handle institutional logics by combining interaction with actors across levels in the public sector, thereby mixing top-down and bottom-up approaches. As such, the three approaches point out that private firms, when handling institutional logics, can do this by either modifying them or integrating them. Finally, some firms end up avoiding them in their efforts to commercialize PPI solutions within the Danish public health care system and focus on other markets.",
author = "Nissen, {Helle Aar{\o}e} and Clarke, {Ann H{\o}jbjerg} and Evald, {Majbritt Rostgaard} and Munksgaard, {Kristin Balslev}",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
note = "30th Annual IMP Conference ; Conference date: 01-09-2014 Through 06-09-2014",

}

Firms’ maneuvering between institutional logics in the public sector for commercializing welfare innovations. / Nissen, Helle Aarøe; Clarke, Ann Højbjerg; Evald, Majbritt Rostgaard; Munksgaard, Kristin Balslev.

2014. Abstract from 30th Annual IMP Conference, Bordeaux, France.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Firms’ maneuvering between institutional logics in the public sector for commercializing welfare innovations

AU - Nissen, Helle Aarøe

AU - Clarke, Ann Højbjerg

AU - Evald, Majbritt Rostgaard

AU - Munksgaard, Kristin Balslev

PY - 2014

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N2 - The article aims to explore, through a micro level focus, how individual private firm actors maneuver between institutional logics embedded in different individual public actors operating at various levels in the public sector, when making efforts towards commercializing innovative welfare solutions developed through Public Private Innovation (PPI). Institutional logics are socially constructed patterns of taken-for-granted practices and belief systems that provide actors meaning. Therefore, knowing how to handle institutional logics becomes essential for private firm actors as institutional logics embedded in public actors influence whether private firm actors are successful or not in achieving commercialization in the public market. The study is based on an in-depth case-study containing 4 PPI projects that have succeeded in commercializing their solutions in one way or another. All projects focus on developing innovative solutions to the public health care system through a joint innovation process between public and private actors, which afterwards potentially can be commercialized in the public health care market. The preliminary findings show that private firms, who succeed in commercializing interact with public actors operating at various levels in the public sector using a top-down, bottom-up or mixed approach. The top-down approach shows that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in political and managerial actors by creating legitimacy and accept from above concerning their welfare solutions. The bottom-up approach exemplify that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in actors of health professionals by generating a need for new solutions from below and by gaining access to a network of health professionals in the broader public health care market. The mixed approach demonstrates that private firms handle institutional logics by combining interaction with actors across levels in the public sector, thereby mixing top-down and bottom-up approaches. As such, the three approaches point out that private firms, when handling institutional logics, can do this by either modifying them or integrating them. Finally, some firms end up avoiding them in their efforts to commercialize PPI solutions within the Danish public health care system and focus on other markets.

AB - The article aims to explore, through a micro level focus, how individual private firm actors maneuver between institutional logics embedded in different individual public actors operating at various levels in the public sector, when making efforts towards commercializing innovative welfare solutions developed through Public Private Innovation (PPI). Institutional logics are socially constructed patterns of taken-for-granted practices and belief systems that provide actors meaning. Therefore, knowing how to handle institutional logics becomes essential for private firm actors as institutional logics embedded in public actors influence whether private firm actors are successful or not in achieving commercialization in the public market. The study is based on an in-depth case-study containing 4 PPI projects that have succeeded in commercializing their solutions in one way or another. All projects focus on developing innovative solutions to the public health care system through a joint innovation process between public and private actors, which afterwards potentially can be commercialized in the public health care market. The preliminary findings show that private firms, who succeed in commercializing interact with public actors operating at various levels in the public sector using a top-down, bottom-up or mixed approach. The top-down approach shows that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in political and managerial actors by creating legitimacy and accept from above concerning their welfare solutions. The bottom-up approach exemplify that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in actors of health professionals by generating a need for new solutions from below and by gaining access to a network of health professionals in the broader public health care market. The mixed approach demonstrates that private firms handle institutional logics by combining interaction with actors across levels in the public sector, thereby mixing top-down and bottom-up approaches. As such, the three approaches point out that private firms, when handling institutional logics, can do this by either modifying them or integrating them. Finally, some firms end up avoiding them in their efforts to commercialize PPI solutions within the Danish public health care system and focus on other markets.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -