Feasibility of integrating vestibular rehabilitation and cognitive behaviour therapy for people with persistent dizziness

Lene Kristiansen, L H Magnussen, B Juul-Kristensen, S Mæland, S H G Nordahl, A Hovland, T Sjøbø, K T Wilhelmsen

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of integrating vestibular rehabilitation and cognitive behaviour therapy (VR-CBT) for people with persistent dizziness in primary care.

Design: Prospective single-group pre- and post-test study.

Participants: Adults (aged 18-70) with acute onset of dizziness and symptoms lasting a minimum 3 months, recruited from Bergen municipality.

Methods: Participants attended eight weekly group sessions of VR-CBT intervention. Feasibility outcomes consisted of recruitment and testing procedures, intervention adherence, and participant feedback, besides change in primary outcomes. The primary outcomes were Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and preferred gait velocity.

Results: Seven participants were recruited for the study. All participants completed the pre-treatment tests, five participants completed the intervention and answered post-treatment questionnaires, and three completed post-treatment testing. Of the five participants, three attended at least 75% of the VR-CBT sessions, and two 50% of the sessions. Participants reported that the VR-CBT was relevant and led to improvement in function. DHI scores improved beyond minimal important change in two out of five participants, and preferred gait velocity increased beyond minimal important change in two out of three participants.

Conclusion: The current tests and VR-CBT treatment protocols were feasible. Some changes are suggested to optimise the protocols, before conducting a randomised controlled trial.

Trial registration: NCT02655575. Registered 14 January 2016-retrospectively registered.

Original languageEnglish
Article number69
JournalPilot and Feasibility Studies
Volume5
Number of pages10
ISSN2055-5784
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20. May 2019

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Dizziness
Equipment and Supplies
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials

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Kristiansen, Lene ; Magnussen, L H ; Juul-Kristensen, B ; Mæland, S ; Nordahl, S H G ; Hovland, A ; Sjøbø, T ; Wilhelmsen, K T. / Feasibility of integrating vestibular rehabilitation and cognitive behaviour therapy for people with persistent dizziness. In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies. 2019 ; Vol. 5.
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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of integrating vestibular rehabilitation and cognitive behaviour therapy (VR-CBT) for people with persistent dizziness in primary care.Design: Prospective single-group pre- and post-test study.Participants: Adults (aged 18-70) with acute onset of dizziness and symptoms lasting a minimum 3 months, recruited from Bergen municipality.Methods: Participants attended eight weekly group sessions of VR-CBT intervention. Feasibility outcomes consisted of recruitment and testing procedures, intervention adherence, and participant feedback, besides change in primary outcomes. The primary outcomes were Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and preferred gait velocity.Results: Seven participants were recruited for the study. All participants completed the pre-treatment tests, five participants completed the intervention and answered post-treatment questionnaires, and three completed post-treatment testing. Of the five participants, three attended at least 75{\%} of the VR-CBT sessions, and two 50{\%} of the sessions. Participants reported that the VR-CBT was relevant and led to improvement in function. DHI scores improved beyond minimal important change in two out of five participants, and preferred gait velocity increased beyond minimal important change in two out of three participants.Conclusion: The current tests and VR-CBT treatment protocols were feasible. Some changes are suggested to optimise the protocols, before conducting a randomised controlled trial.Trial registration: NCT02655575. Registered 14 January 2016-retrospectively registered.",
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Feasibility of integrating vestibular rehabilitation and cognitive behaviour therapy for people with persistent dizziness. / Kristiansen, Lene; Magnussen, L H; Juul-Kristensen, B; Mæland, S; Nordahl, S H G; Hovland, A; Sjøbø, T; Wilhelmsen, K T.

In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies, Vol. 5, 69, 20.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Feasibility of integrating vestibular rehabilitation and cognitive behaviour therapy for people with persistent dizziness

AU - Kristiansen, Lene

AU - Magnussen, L H

AU - Juul-Kristensen, B

AU - Mæland, S

AU - Nordahl, S H G

AU - Hovland, A

AU - Sjøbø, T

AU - Wilhelmsen, K T

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N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of integrating vestibular rehabilitation and cognitive behaviour therapy (VR-CBT) for people with persistent dizziness in primary care.Design: Prospective single-group pre- and post-test study.Participants: Adults (aged 18-70) with acute onset of dizziness and symptoms lasting a minimum 3 months, recruited from Bergen municipality.Methods: Participants attended eight weekly group sessions of VR-CBT intervention. Feasibility outcomes consisted of recruitment and testing procedures, intervention adherence, and participant feedback, besides change in primary outcomes. The primary outcomes were Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and preferred gait velocity.Results: Seven participants were recruited for the study. All participants completed the pre-treatment tests, five participants completed the intervention and answered post-treatment questionnaires, and three completed post-treatment testing. Of the five participants, three attended at least 75% of the VR-CBT sessions, and two 50% of the sessions. Participants reported that the VR-CBT was relevant and led to improvement in function. DHI scores improved beyond minimal important change in two out of five participants, and preferred gait velocity increased beyond minimal important change in two out of three participants.Conclusion: The current tests and VR-CBT treatment protocols were feasible. Some changes are suggested to optimise the protocols, before conducting a randomised controlled trial.Trial registration: NCT02655575. Registered 14 January 2016-retrospectively registered.

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