Feasibility and health effects of a 15-week combined exercise programme for sedentary elderly: A randomised controlled trial

Tina Thea Nielsen, Trine K. Møller, Lars L. Andersen, Mette K. Zebis, Peter R. Hansen, Peter Krustrup*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

There is strong evidence that considerable health benefits can be achieved even with small amounts of physical activity. However, getting people to exercise regularly is a major challenge not least in the elderly population. This study investigated the feasibility and physiological health effects of a pragmatic 15-week exercise programme for sedentary elderly. In a single-blind randomised controlled trial, 45 sedentary 60-83-year-olds (25 women, 20 men) were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to a training group (TG, n=30) or a control group (CG, n=15). The training in TG consisted of a combination of exercise modalities (i.e., strength, aerobic fitness, stability, and flexibility training) performed once a week as supervised group-based training and a weekly home-based training for 15 weeks. Feasibility outcomes were exercise intensity, adherence, and adverse events. The primary outcome was change in aerobic fitness (VO2max/kg). Adherence was high (81%) for the supervised exercise and low (0%) for the home-based exercise. No acute injuries occurred in TG, but 4 subjects (13%) reported considerable joint pain related to training. Average heart rate (HR) during the supervised training was 104±12 beats/min (69.3±8.0%HRmax), with 3.9±7.3% of training time >90%HRmax. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no between-group differences for aerobic fitness (P=0.790) or any secondary cardiovascular outcomes at 15-week follow-up (resting HR or blood pressure; P>0.05). Compared to CG, bodyweight (-2.3 kg, 95% CI-4.0 to-7.0; P=0.006), total fat mass (-2.0 kg, 95% CI-3.5 to-0.5; P=0.01), and total fat percentage (-1.6%, 95% CI-2.8 to-0.3; P=0.01) decreased in TG. The group-based supervised training had high adherence and moderate exercise intensity, whereas the home-based training was not feasible in this study population. This exercise programme performed once a week did not improve aerobic fitness. Thus, supervised training with more vigorous intensity control appears advisable. Clinical Study registration number is H-15016951.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3081029
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2019
Number of pages12
ISSN2314-6133
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23. Jan 2019

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Randomized Controlled Trials
Fats
Health
Exercise
Blood pressure
Intention to Treat Analysis
Feasibility Studies
Insurance Benefits
Population
Control Groups
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Blood Pressure
  • Cardiovascular Abnormalities/physiopathology
  • Exercise
  • Exercise Therapy
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Sedentary Behavior
  • Single-Blind Method
  • Time Factors

Cite this

@article{9f248e149fe5436fbceed81b5ea5f32c,
title = "Feasibility and health effects of a 15-week combined exercise programme for sedentary elderly: A randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "There is strong evidence that considerable health benefits can be achieved even with small amounts of physical activity. However, getting people to exercise regularly is a major challenge not least in the elderly population. This study investigated the feasibility and physiological health effects of a pragmatic 15-week exercise programme for sedentary elderly. In a single-blind randomised controlled trial, 45 sedentary 60-83-year-olds (25 women, 20 men) were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to a training group (TG, n=30) or a control group (CG, n=15). The training in TG consisted of a combination of exercise modalities (i.e., strength, aerobic fitness, stability, and flexibility training) performed once a week as supervised group-based training and a weekly home-based training for 15 weeks. Feasibility outcomes were exercise intensity, adherence, and adverse events. The primary outcome was change in aerobic fitness (VO2max/kg). Adherence was high (81{\%}) for the supervised exercise and low (0{\%}) for the home-based exercise. No acute injuries occurred in TG, but 4 subjects (13{\%}) reported considerable joint pain related to training. Average heart rate (HR) during the supervised training was 104±12 beats/min (69.3±8.0{\%}HRmax), with 3.9±7.3{\%} of training time >90{\%}HRmax. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no between-group differences for aerobic fitness (P=0.790) or any secondary cardiovascular outcomes at 15-week follow-up (resting HR or blood pressure; P>0.05). Compared to CG, bodyweight (-2.3 kg, 95{\%} CI-4.0 to-7.0; P=0.006), total fat mass (-2.0 kg, 95{\%} CI-3.5 to-0.5; P=0.01), and total fat percentage (-1.6{\%}, 95{\%} CI-2.8 to-0.3; P=0.01) decreased in TG. The group-based supervised training had high adherence and moderate exercise intensity, whereas the home-based training was not feasible in this study population. This exercise programme performed once a week did not improve aerobic fitness. Thus, supervised training with more vigorous intensity control appears advisable. Clinical Study registration number is H-15016951.",
keywords = "Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular Abnormalities/physiopathology, Exercise, Exercise Therapy, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Sedentary Behavior, Single-Blind Method, Time Factors",
author = "Nielsen, {Tina Thea} and M{\o}ller, {Trine K.} and Andersen, {Lars L.} and Zebis, {Mette K.} and Hansen, {Peter R.} and Peter Krustrup",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1155/2019/3081029",
language = "English",
volume = "2019",
journal = "BioMed Research International",
issn = "2314-6133",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

Feasibility and health effects of a 15-week combined exercise programme for sedentary elderly : A randomised controlled trial. / Nielsen, Tina Thea; Møller, Trine K.; Andersen, Lars L.; Zebis, Mette K.; Hansen, Peter R.; Krustrup, Peter.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2019, 3081029, 23.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility and health effects of a 15-week combined exercise programme for sedentary elderly

T2 - A randomised controlled trial

AU - Nielsen, Tina Thea

AU - Møller, Trine K.

AU - Andersen, Lars L.

AU - Zebis, Mette K.

AU - Hansen, Peter R.

AU - Krustrup, Peter

PY - 2019/1/23

Y1 - 2019/1/23

N2 - There is strong evidence that considerable health benefits can be achieved even with small amounts of physical activity. However, getting people to exercise regularly is a major challenge not least in the elderly population. This study investigated the feasibility and physiological health effects of a pragmatic 15-week exercise programme for sedentary elderly. In a single-blind randomised controlled trial, 45 sedentary 60-83-year-olds (25 women, 20 men) were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to a training group (TG, n=30) or a control group (CG, n=15). The training in TG consisted of a combination of exercise modalities (i.e., strength, aerobic fitness, stability, and flexibility training) performed once a week as supervised group-based training and a weekly home-based training for 15 weeks. Feasibility outcomes were exercise intensity, adherence, and adverse events. The primary outcome was change in aerobic fitness (VO2max/kg). Adherence was high (81%) for the supervised exercise and low (0%) for the home-based exercise. No acute injuries occurred in TG, but 4 subjects (13%) reported considerable joint pain related to training. Average heart rate (HR) during the supervised training was 104±12 beats/min (69.3±8.0%HRmax), with 3.9±7.3% of training time >90%HRmax. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no between-group differences for aerobic fitness (P=0.790) or any secondary cardiovascular outcomes at 15-week follow-up (resting HR or blood pressure; P>0.05). Compared to CG, bodyweight (-2.3 kg, 95% CI-4.0 to-7.0; P=0.006), total fat mass (-2.0 kg, 95% CI-3.5 to-0.5; P=0.01), and total fat percentage (-1.6%, 95% CI-2.8 to-0.3; P=0.01) decreased in TG. The group-based supervised training had high adherence and moderate exercise intensity, whereas the home-based training was not feasible in this study population. This exercise programme performed once a week did not improve aerobic fitness. Thus, supervised training with more vigorous intensity control appears advisable. Clinical Study registration number is H-15016951.

AB - There is strong evidence that considerable health benefits can be achieved even with small amounts of physical activity. However, getting people to exercise regularly is a major challenge not least in the elderly population. This study investigated the feasibility and physiological health effects of a pragmatic 15-week exercise programme for sedentary elderly. In a single-blind randomised controlled trial, 45 sedentary 60-83-year-olds (25 women, 20 men) were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to a training group (TG, n=30) or a control group (CG, n=15). The training in TG consisted of a combination of exercise modalities (i.e., strength, aerobic fitness, stability, and flexibility training) performed once a week as supervised group-based training and a weekly home-based training for 15 weeks. Feasibility outcomes were exercise intensity, adherence, and adverse events. The primary outcome was change in aerobic fitness (VO2max/kg). Adherence was high (81%) for the supervised exercise and low (0%) for the home-based exercise. No acute injuries occurred in TG, but 4 subjects (13%) reported considerable joint pain related to training. Average heart rate (HR) during the supervised training was 104±12 beats/min (69.3±8.0%HRmax), with 3.9±7.3% of training time >90%HRmax. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no between-group differences for aerobic fitness (P=0.790) or any secondary cardiovascular outcomes at 15-week follow-up (resting HR or blood pressure; P>0.05). Compared to CG, bodyweight (-2.3 kg, 95% CI-4.0 to-7.0; P=0.006), total fat mass (-2.0 kg, 95% CI-3.5 to-0.5; P=0.01), and total fat percentage (-1.6%, 95% CI-2.8 to-0.3; P=0.01) decreased in TG. The group-based supervised training had high adherence and moderate exercise intensity, whereas the home-based training was not feasible in this study population. This exercise programme performed once a week did not improve aerobic fitness. Thus, supervised training with more vigorous intensity control appears advisable. Clinical Study registration number is H-15016951.

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Blood Pressure

KW - Cardiovascular Abnormalities/physiopathology

KW - Exercise

KW - Exercise Therapy

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Sedentary Behavior

KW - Single-Blind Method

KW - Time Factors

U2 - 10.1155/2019/3081029

DO - 10.1155/2019/3081029

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30809536

AN - SCOPUS:85061328644

VL - 2019

JO - BioMed Research International

JF - BioMed Research International

SN - 2314-6133

M1 - 3081029

ER -