Far away

The relation between Denmark and Israel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In the minds of Danish politicians and the Danish public, the Middle East and Israel were traditionally far away. In the first decades after the founding of the Jewish state, only on rare occasions did the Danish Parliament discuss related issues. However, this changed in the 1970s, due to two developments: Danish membership in the UN, NATO and especially the EEC gradually expanded the horizons of Danish politicians; and the Israeli–Palestinian conflict started to impact Denmark because of an increased number of Palestinian refugees, the oil crisis, and the rise of Palestinian terrorism in Europe. During these years the pro-Israel consensus, which had dominated Danish politics, was challenged from the far-left wing, which began to show solidarity with the Palestinian cause. As the 1968 generation of politicians grew older and rose to power, scepticism towards Israel gradually grew stronger. At the turn of the millennium, this culminated with the Danish Foreign Minister Mogens Lykketoft publicly taking a position against Israel, and the fierce Danish public debate about the newly appointed Israeli Ambassador to Denmark, Carmi Gillon, a former head of the Israeli Security Services (Shin Bet). Following the war against terror and Denmark’s own increasing role in conflicts in the Middle East, Danish–Israeli relations stabilized.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIsrael in a turbulent Region : Security and Foreign Policy
EditorsTore Tingvold Petersen
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Publication date2019
Pages149-175
Chapter8
ISBN (Print)978-1-138-62450-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
SeriesRoutledge Studies in Middle Eastern Politics
Volume94
ISSN1754-873X

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Denmark
Israel
politician
Middle East
Israeli
terrorism
oil crisis
EEC
diplomat
NATO
Palestinian
parliament
minister
solidarity
refugee
UNO
cause
politics

Cite this

Friis, T. W., & Levitan, N. (2019). Far away: The relation between Denmark and Israel. In T. T. Petersen (Ed.), Israel in a turbulent Region: Security and Foreign Policy (pp. 149-175). London: Routledge. Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Politics, Vol.. 94 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429460791-9
Friis, Thomas Wegener ; Levitan, Nir . / Far away : The relation between Denmark and Israel. Israel in a turbulent Region: Security and Foreign Policy. editor / Tore Tingvold Petersen. London : Routledge, 2019. pp. 149-175 (Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Politics, Vol. 94).
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Friis, TW & Levitan, N 2019, Far away: The relation between Denmark and Israel. in TT Petersen (ed.), Israel in a turbulent Region: Security and Foreign Policy. Routledge, London, Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Politics, vol. 94, pp. 149-175. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429460791-9

Far away : The relation between Denmark and Israel. / Friis, Thomas Wegener; Levitan, Nir .

Israel in a turbulent Region: Security and Foreign Policy. ed. / Tore Tingvold Petersen. London : Routledge, 2019. p. 149-175 (Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Politics, Vol. 94).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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Friis TW, Levitan N. Far away: The relation between Denmark and Israel. In Petersen TT, editor, Israel in a turbulent Region: Security and Foreign Policy. London: Routledge. 2019. p. 149-175. (Routledge Studies in Middle Eastern Politics, Vol. 94). https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429460791-9