Exploring the term "resilience" in arctic health and well-being using a sharing circle as a community-centered approach

Insights from a conference workshop

Gwen Healey Akearok*, Katie Cueva, Jon Petter A. Stoor, Christina V.L. Larsen, Elizabeth Rink, Nicole Kanayurak, Anastasia Emelyanova, Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

In the field of Arctic health, "resilience" is a term and concept used to describe capacity to recover from difficulties. While the term is widely used in Arctic policy contexts, there is debate at the community level on whether "resilience" is an appropriate term to describe the human dimensions of health and wellness in the Arctic. Further, research methods used to investigate resilience have largely been limited to Western science research methodologies, which emphasize empirical quantitative studies and may not mirror the perspective of the Arctic communities under study. To explore conceptions of resilience in Arctic communities, a Sharing Circle was facilitated at the International Congress on Circumpolar Health in 2018. With participants engaging from seven of the eight Arctic countries, participants shared critiques of the term "resilience," and their perspectives on key components of thriving communities. Upon reflection, this use of a Sharing Circle suggests that it may be a useful tool for deeper investigations into health-related issues affecting Arctic Peoples. The Sharing Circle may serve as a meaningful methodology for engaging communities using resonant research strategies to decolonize concepts of resilience and highlight new dimensions for promoting thriving communities in Arctic populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number45
JournalSocial Sciences
Volume8
Issue number2
Number of pages11
ISSN2076-0760
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2. Feb 2019

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Arctic
resilience
well-being
health
community
methodology
research method
science

Keywords

  • Arctic
  • Decolonizing methodologies
  • Indigenous methodologies
  • Qualitative
  • Resilience

Cite this

Akearok, Gwen Healey ; Cueva, Katie ; Stoor, Jon Petter A. ; Larsen, Christina V.L. ; Rink, Elizabeth ; Kanayurak, Nicole ; Emelyanova, Anastasia ; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y. / Exploring the term "resilience" in arctic health and well-being using a sharing circle as a community-centered approach : Insights from a conference workshop. In: Social Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 2.
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abstract = "In the field of Arctic health, {"}resilience{"} is a term and concept used to describe capacity to recover from difficulties. While the term is widely used in Arctic policy contexts, there is debate at the community level on whether {"}resilience{"} is an appropriate term to describe the human dimensions of health and wellness in the Arctic. Further, research methods used to investigate resilience have largely been limited to Western science research methodologies, which emphasize empirical quantitative studies and may not mirror the perspective of the Arctic communities under study. To explore conceptions of resilience in Arctic communities, a Sharing Circle was facilitated at the International Congress on Circumpolar Health in 2018. With participants engaging from seven of the eight Arctic countries, participants shared critiques of the term {"}resilience,{"} and their perspectives on key components of thriving communities. Upon reflection, this use of a Sharing Circle suggests that it may be a useful tool for deeper investigations into health-related issues affecting Arctic Peoples. The Sharing Circle may serve as a meaningful methodology for engaging communities using resonant research strategies to decolonize concepts of resilience and highlight new dimensions for promoting thriving communities in Arctic populations.",
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Exploring the term "resilience" in arctic health and well-being using a sharing circle as a community-centered approach : Insights from a conference workshop. / Akearok, Gwen Healey; Cueva, Katie; Stoor, Jon Petter A.; Larsen, Christina V.L.; Rink, Elizabeth; Kanayurak, Nicole; Emelyanova, Anastasia; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.

In: Social Sciences, Vol. 8, No. 2, 45, 02.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Stoor, Jon Petter A.

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