Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Mike Murray, Britt Lange, Bo Riebeling Nørnberg, Karen Søgaard, Gisela Sjøgaard

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Neck pain is frequent among helicopter pilots and crew (1). The aim of this study was to investigate if an exercise intervention could reduce the prevalence of neck-pain among helicopter pilots and crew.

Methods: Thirty-one pilots and thirty-eight crew members were randomized to an exercise-training-group ETG (n=35) or a reference-group REF (n=34). ETG underwent 20 weeks of strength-endurance and coordination training, targeting deep/superficial neck muscles. REF received no training. Primary outcome: Intensity of neck-pain the previous 3-months (11-point numeric box scale) (2) and Pressure-Pain-Threshold (PPT) in the trapezius m. and upper neck extensors. Secondary outcome: Maximal-Voluntary-Contraction (MVC) for cervical flexion/extension and shoulder-elevation.

Results: Neck-pain for ETG was (mean±SD) 1.9±1.7 at baseline and 1.8±2.1 at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 2.4±2.0 and 1.7±1.7. Preliminary intention-to-treat analysis, revealed no significant effect on change in pain or PPT between groups. Further analysis, controlling for training frequency, intensity and volume are pending. Baseline MVC for ETG cervical flexion/extension was 184.4±59.8N and 247.2±63.8N, and for REF 177.4±49.1N and 242.3±62.8N, respectively. At follow-up, cervical extension was significantly improved in ETG compared to REF (P=0.020).

Discussion: Specific exercise training significantly increased strength in the neck extensors. Increased strength will reduce load on the cervical spine and potentially alleviate neck-disorders. However, this effect was not significant in the preliminary intention to treat analysis.

References:
1. Adam J. Results of NVG-Induced Neck Strain Questionnaire Study in CH-146 Griffon Aircrew. In: (CANADA) DRADT, editor. DTIC Information for the Defense Community; 2004.

2. Kuorinka I, Jonsson B, Kilbom A, Vinterberg H, Bieringsorensen F, Andersson G, et al. Standardized Nordic Questionnaires For The Analysis Of Musculoskeletal Symptoms. Appl Ergon 1987;18(3):233-237.




Original languageEnglish
Publication date2015
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventAerospace Medicine Summit and NATO STO Technical Course - Ramstein Airbase, Ramstein, Germany
Duration: 9. Mar 201513. Mar 2015

Conference

ConferenceAerospace Medicine Summit and NATO STO Technical Course
LocationRamstein Airbase
CountryGermany
CityRamstein
Period09/03/201513/03/2015

Fingerprint

Neck Pain
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Intention to Treat Analysis
Pain Threshold
Neck Muscles
Dacarbazine
Superficial Back Muscles
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Murray, M., Lange, B., Nørnberg, B. R., Søgaard, K., & Sjøgaard, G. (2015). Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract from Aerospace Medicine Summit and NATO STO Technical Course, Ramstein, Germany.
Murray, Mike ; Lange, Britt ; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling ; Søgaard, Karen ; Sjøgaard, Gisela. / Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members : A Randomized Controlled Trial. Abstract from Aerospace Medicine Summit and NATO STO Technical Course, Ramstein, Germany.1 p.
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Murray, M, Lange, B, Nørnberg, BR, Søgaard, K & Sjøgaard, G 2015, 'Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members: A Randomized Controlled Trial', Aerospace Medicine Summit and NATO STO Technical Course, Ramstein, Germany, 09/03/2015 - 13/03/2015.

Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members : A Randomized Controlled Trial. / Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling; Søgaard, Karen; Sjøgaard, Gisela.

2015. Abstract from Aerospace Medicine Summit and NATO STO Technical Course, Ramstein, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

TY - ABST

T1 - Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

T2 - A Randomized Controlled Trial

AU - Murray, Mike

AU - Lange, Britt

AU - Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

AU - Søgaard, Karen

AU - Sjøgaard, Gisela

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Introduction: Neck pain is frequent among helicopter pilots and crew (1). The aim of this study was to investigate if an exercise intervention could reduce the prevalence of neck-pain among helicopter pilots and crew.Methods: Thirty-one pilots and thirty-eight crew members were randomized to an exercise-training-group ETG (n=35) or a reference-group REF (n=34). ETG underwent 20 weeks of strength-endurance and coordination training, targeting deep/superficial neck muscles. REF received no training. Primary outcome: Intensity of neck-pain the previous 3-months (11-point numeric box scale) (2) and Pressure-Pain-Threshold (PPT) in the trapezius m. and upper neck extensors. Secondary outcome: Maximal-Voluntary-Contraction (MVC) for cervical flexion/extension and shoulder-elevation. Results: Neck-pain for ETG was (mean±SD) 1.9±1.7 at baseline and 1.8±2.1 at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 2.4±2.0 and 1.7±1.7. Preliminary intention-to-treat analysis, revealed no significant effect on change in pain or PPT between groups. Further analysis, controlling for training frequency, intensity and volume are pending. Baseline MVC for ETG cervical flexion/extension was 184.4±59.8N and 247.2±63.8N, and for REF 177.4±49.1N and 242.3±62.8N, respectively. At follow-up, cervical extension was significantly improved in ETG compared to REF (P=0.020).Discussion: Specific exercise training significantly increased strength in the neck extensors. Increased strength will reduce load on the cervical spine and potentially alleviate neck-disorders. However, this effect was not significant in the preliminary intention to treat analysis. References:1. Adam J. Results of NVG-Induced Neck Strain Questionnaire Study in CH-146 Griffon Aircrew. In: (CANADA) DRADT, editor. DTIC Information for the Defense Community; 2004.2. Kuorinka I, Jonsson B, Kilbom A, Vinterberg H, Bieringsorensen F, Andersson G, et al. Standardized Nordic Questionnaires For The Analysis Of Musculoskeletal Symptoms. Appl Ergon 1987;18(3):233-237.

AB - Introduction: Neck pain is frequent among helicopter pilots and crew (1). The aim of this study was to investigate if an exercise intervention could reduce the prevalence of neck-pain among helicopter pilots and crew.Methods: Thirty-one pilots and thirty-eight crew members were randomized to an exercise-training-group ETG (n=35) or a reference-group REF (n=34). ETG underwent 20 weeks of strength-endurance and coordination training, targeting deep/superficial neck muscles. REF received no training. Primary outcome: Intensity of neck-pain the previous 3-months (11-point numeric box scale) (2) and Pressure-Pain-Threshold (PPT) in the trapezius m. and upper neck extensors. Secondary outcome: Maximal-Voluntary-Contraction (MVC) for cervical flexion/extension and shoulder-elevation. Results: Neck-pain for ETG was (mean±SD) 1.9±1.7 at baseline and 1.8±2.1 at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 2.4±2.0 and 1.7±1.7. Preliminary intention-to-treat analysis, revealed no significant effect on change in pain or PPT between groups. Further analysis, controlling for training frequency, intensity and volume are pending. Baseline MVC for ETG cervical flexion/extension was 184.4±59.8N and 247.2±63.8N, and for REF 177.4±49.1N and 242.3±62.8N, respectively. At follow-up, cervical extension was significantly improved in ETG compared to REF (P=0.020).Discussion: Specific exercise training significantly increased strength in the neck extensors. Increased strength will reduce load on the cervical spine and potentially alleviate neck-disorders. However, this effect was not significant in the preliminary intention to treat analysis. References:1. Adam J. Results of NVG-Induced Neck Strain Questionnaire Study in CH-146 Griffon Aircrew. In: (CANADA) DRADT, editor. DTIC Information for the Defense Community; 2004.2. Kuorinka I, Jonsson B, Kilbom A, Vinterberg H, Bieringsorensen F, Andersson G, et al. Standardized Nordic Questionnaires For The Analysis Of Musculoskeletal Symptoms. Appl Ergon 1987;18(3):233-237.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Murray M, Lange B, Nørnberg BR, Søgaard K, Sjøgaard G. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 2015. Abstract from Aerospace Medicine Summit and NATO STO Technical Course, Ramstein, Germany.