Examining school-based hygiene facilities: a quantitative assessment in a Ghanaian municipality

Emmanuel Appiah-Brempong, Muriel J Harris, Samuel Newton, Gabriel Gulis

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

114 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: The crucial role of adequate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities in influencing children's handwashing behaviour is widely reported. Report from UNICEF indicates a dearth of adequate data on WASH facilities in schools, especially in the developing world. This study sought to contribute to building the evidence-base on school hygiene facilities in Ghana. The study further explored for possible associations and differences between key variables within the context of school water, sanitation and hygiene. Methods: Data was collected from 37 junior high schools using an observational checklist. Methods of data analysis included a Scalogram model, Fisher's exact test, and a Student's t-test. Results: Results of the study showed a facility deficiency in many schools: 33% of schools had students washing their hands in a shared receptacle (bowl), 24% had students using a single cotton towel to dry hands after handwashing, and only 16% of schools had a functional water facility. Furthermore, results of a proportion test indicated that 83% of schools which had functional water facilities also had functional handwashing stations. On the other hand, only 3% of schools which had functional water facilities also had a functional handwashing stations. A test of difference in the proportions of the two sets of schools showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). In addition, 40% of schools which had financial provisions for water supply also had functional handwashing stations. On the other hand, only 7% of schools which had financial provisions for water supply also had functional handwashing stations. There was a statistically significant difference in the proportions of the two sets of schools (p = 0.02). Conclusion: We conclude that it is essential to have a financial provision for water supply in schools as this can potentially influence the existence of a handwashing station in a school. An intervention by government, educational authorities and civil society organisations towards enabling schools in low resource areas to have a sustainable budgetary allocation for WASH facilities would be timely.

Original languageEnglish
Article number581
JournalB M C Public Health
Volume18
Number of pages8
ISSN1471-2458
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2. May 2018

Keywords

  • school
  • water
  • hygiene
  • functional
  • facilities
  • Functional
  • Water
  • School
  • Hygiene
  • Facilities
  • Humans
  • Sanitation
  • Male
  • Ghana
  • Hand Disinfection
  • Female
  • Water Supply
  • Cities
  • Child
  • Schools

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Examining school-based hygiene facilities: a quantitative assessment in a Ghanaian municipality'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this