Environmental needs in childhood disability analysed by the WHO ICF, Child and Youth Version

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

28 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The WHO has launched a common classification for disabilities in children, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY). We wanted to determine whether cat-egories of the environmental (e) and the body functions (b) components of the classification could address environmental needs in children with different disorders and various disability severities.

METHODS: A set of 16 e categories and 47 b categories were selected and worded to best enable parents to describe children's everyday support needs and environmental influences through interviews in their own homes.

RESULTS: Of the 367 invited parents, 332 (90.5%) participated, providing data on children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairments, hearing impairments, mental disability and disabilities following brain tumour treatment. The mean age of children across disabilities was 9.4 years (range: 1.0-15.9). The mean e code score was 35.7 (range: 4.0-64.0), and the mean b code score was 32.2 (range: 0.0-159.0). The most urgent needs as detected by qualifier 4 environmental categories scores were common among children with complex disorders and issues related to health professionals, legal services and health services.

CONCLUSIONS: Parents understand the environmental and body function components in a meaningful manner and the codes seem to be valid. Special emphasis should be given to environmental issues for children with more complex disabilities. There was no correlation between the severity of a disability and environmental issues, indicating that each child's needs were basically met, irrespective of disability severity.

FUNDING: partnership project § 16, 21, 31 administered by the Danish Health Authority.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberA5238
JournalDanish Medical Journal
Volume63
Issue number6
ISSN2245-1919
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

Fingerprint

Parents
Spinal Dysraphism
Health
Cerebral Palsy
Health Services
Cats
Interviews

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

@article{4c8d7aa86e2a4235904cc3be8160e113,
title = "Environmental needs in childhood disability analysed by the WHO ICF, Child and Youth Version",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: The WHO has launched a common classification for disabilities in children, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY). We wanted to determine whether cat-egories of the environmental (e) and the body functions (b) components of the classification could address environmental needs in children with different disorders and various disability severities.METHODS: A set of 16 e categories and 47 b categories were selected and worded to best enable parents to describe children's everyday support needs and environmental influences through interviews in their own homes.RESULTS: Of the 367 invited parents, 332 (90.5{\%}) participated, providing data on children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairments, hearing impairments, mental disability and disabilities following brain tumour treatment. The mean age of children across disabilities was 9.4 years (range: 1.0-15.9). The mean e code score was 35.7 (range: 4.0-64.0), and the mean b code score was 32.2 (range: 0.0-159.0). The most urgent needs as detected by qualifier 4 environmental categories scores were common among children with complex disorders and issues related to health professionals, legal services and health services.CONCLUSIONS: Parents understand the environmental and body function components in a meaningful manner and the codes seem to be valid. Special emphasis should be given to environmental issues for children with more complex disabilities. There was no correlation between the severity of a disability and environmental issues, indicating that each child's needs were basically met, irrespective of disability severity.FUNDING: partnership project § 16, 21, 31 administered by the Danish Health Authority.TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Illum, {Niels Ove} and Mette Bonderup and Gradel, {Kim Oren}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
journal = "Danish Medical Journal",
issn = "1603-9629",
publisher = "DANISH MEDICAL ASSOC",
number = "6",

}

Environmental needs in childhood disability analysed by the WHO ICF, Child and Youth Version. / Illum, Niels Ove; Bonderup, Mette; Gradel, Kim Oren.

In: Danish Medical Journal, Vol. 63, No. 6, A5238, 06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Environmental needs in childhood disability analysed by the WHO ICF, Child and Youth Version

AU - Illum, Niels Ove

AU - Bonderup, Mette

AU - Gradel, Kim Oren

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - INTRODUCTION: The WHO has launched a common classification for disabilities in children, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY). We wanted to determine whether cat-egories of the environmental (e) and the body functions (b) components of the classification could address environmental needs in children with different disorders and various disability severities.METHODS: A set of 16 e categories and 47 b categories were selected and worded to best enable parents to describe children's everyday support needs and environmental influences through interviews in their own homes.RESULTS: Of the 367 invited parents, 332 (90.5%) participated, providing data on children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairments, hearing impairments, mental disability and disabilities following brain tumour treatment. The mean age of children across disabilities was 9.4 years (range: 1.0-15.9). The mean e code score was 35.7 (range: 4.0-64.0), and the mean b code score was 32.2 (range: 0.0-159.0). The most urgent needs as detected by qualifier 4 environmental categories scores were common among children with complex disorders and issues related to health professionals, legal services and health services.CONCLUSIONS: Parents understand the environmental and body function components in a meaningful manner and the codes seem to be valid. Special emphasis should be given to environmental issues for children with more complex disabilities. There was no correlation between the severity of a disability and environmental issues, indicating that each child's needs were basically met, irrespective of disability severity.FUNDING: partnership project § 16, 21, 31 administered by the Danish Health Authority.TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

AB - INTRODUCTION: The WHO has launched a common classification for disabilities in children, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Child and Youth Version (ICF-CY). We wanted to determine whether cat-egories of the environmental (e) and the body functions (b) components of the classification could address environmental needs in children with different disorders and various disability severities.METHODS: A set of 16 e categories and 47 b categories were selected and worded to best enable parents to describe children's everyday support needs and environmental influences through interviews in their own homes.RESULTS: Of the 367 invited parents, 332 (90.5%) participated, providing data on children with spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular disorders, cerebral palsy, visual impairments, hearing impairments, mental disability and disabilities following brain tumour treatment. The mean age of children across disabilities was 9.4 years (range: 1.0-15.9). The mean e code score was 35.7 (range: 4.0-64.0), and the mean b code score was 32.2 (range: 0.0-159.0). The most urgent needs as detected by qualifier 4 environmental categories scores were common among children with complex disorders and issues related to health professionals, legal services and health services.CONCLUSIONS: Parents understand the environmental and body function components in a meaningful manner and the codes seem to be valid. Special emphasis should be given to environmental issues for children with more complex disabilities. There was no correlation between the severity of a disability and environmental issues, indicating that each child's needs were basically met, irrespective of disability severity.FUNDING: partnership project § 16, 21, 31 administered by the Danish Health Authority.TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

KW - Journal Article

M3 - Journal article

VL - 63

JO - Danish Medical Journal

JF - Danish Medical Journal

SN - 1603-9629

IS - 6

M1 - A5238

ER -