Electronic measures of movement impairment, repositioning, and posture in people with and without neck pain

a systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a major public health problem. Our objective was to describe differences in measures of movement and posture between people with and without neck pain.

METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched before 15 February 2019 for studies comparing people with neck pain with controls using electronic measurements of neck movement and/or posture. Data were extracted on participants, device, test methods, active range of motion (RoM) and quality of motion, joint positioning sense, and posture. Study quality was assessed using the quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy included in systematic reviews (QUADAS) and Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) guidelines.

RESULTS: Thirty-six studies were included: 24 studies included measurement of active RoM, 15 quality of motion, 12 joint positioning sense, and 5 cervical spine posture. Measurements and test methods were heterogeneous. The reporting of study populations and methods were poor, whereas devices and statistics were well described. All studies on RoM showed reduced active RoM in people with neck pain when compared with controls, 5 of 10 studies reported reduced movement speed for people with neck pain, and 5 of 9 studies reported significantly greater joint positioning error for people with neck pain compared with controls. Due to heterogeneous test parameters and methods, no conclusion regarding differences in conjunct motion, tracking a motion pattern, and measures of posture could be drawn.

CONCLUSIONS: People with neck pain appear to have reduced active RoM, movement speed, and head repositioning accuracy when compared with controls. However, quality of reviewed studies was low and better descriptions of participants and methods are required before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Original languageEnglish
Article number220
JournalSystematic Reviews
Volume8
Issue number1
Number of pages23
ISSN2046-4053
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27. Aug 2019

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Neck Pain
Joints
Guidelines
Equipment and Supplies
Head Movements
PubMed
Public Health
Population

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title = "Electronic measures of movement impairment, repositioning, and posture in people with and without neck pain: a systematic review",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a major public health problem. Our objective was to describe differences in measures of movement and posture between people with and without neck pain.METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched before 15 February 2019 for studies comparing people with neck pain with controls using electronic measurements of neck movement and/or posture. Data were extracted on participants, device, test methods, active range of motion (RoM) and quality of motion, joint positioning sense, and posture. Study quality was assessed using the quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy included in systematic reviews (QUADAS) and Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) guidelines.RESULTS: Thirty-six studies were included: 24 studies included measurement of active RoM, 15 quality of motion, 12 joint positioning sense, and 5 cervical spine posture. Measurements and test methods were heterogeneous. The reporting of study populations and methods were poor, whereas devices and statistics were well described. All studies on RoM showed reduced active RoM in people with neck pain when compared with controls, 5 of 10 studies reported reduced movement speed for people with neck pain, and 5 of 9 studies reported significantly greater joint positioning error for people with neck pain compared with controls. Due to heterogeneous test parameters and methods, no conclusion regarding differences in conjunct motion, tracking a motion pattern, and measures of posture could be drawn.CONCLUSIONS: People with neck pain appear to have reduced active RoM, movement speed, and head repositioning accuracy when compared with controls. However, quality of reviewed studies was low and better descriptions of participants and methods are required before firm conclusions can be drawn.",
author = "Hesby, {Bue Bonderup} and Jan Hartvigsen and Hanne Rasmussen and Per Kjaer",
year = "2019",
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Electronic measures of movement impairment, repositioning, and posture in people with and without neck pain : a systematic review. / Hesby, Bue Bonderup; Hartvigsen, Jan; Rasmussen, Hanne; Kjaer, Per.

In: Systematic Reviews, Vol. 8, No. 1, 220, 27.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Electronic measures of movement impairment, repositioning, and posture in people with and without neck pain

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Hesby, Bue Bonderup

AU - Hartvigsen, Jan

AU - Rasmussen, Hanne

AU - Kjaer, Per

PY - 2019/8/27

Y1 - 2019/8/27

N2 - BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a major public health problem. Our objective was to describe differences in measures of movement and posture between people with and without neck pain.METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched before 15 February 2019 for studies comparing people with neck pain with controls using electronic measurements of neck movement and/or posture. Data were extracted on participants, device, test methods, active range of motion (RoM) and quality of motion, joint positioning sense, and posture. Study quality was assessed using the quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy included in systematic reviews (QUADAS) and Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) guidelines.RESULTS: Thirty-six studies were included: 24 studies included measurement of active RoM, 15 quality of motion, 12 joint positioning sense, and 5 cervical spine posture. Measurements and test methods were heterogeneous. The reporting of study populations and methods were poor, whereas devices and statistics were well described. All studies on RoM showed reduced active RoM in people with neck pain when compared with controls, 5 of 10 studies reported reduced movement speed for people with neck pain, and 5 of 9 studies reported significantly greater joint positioning error for people with neck pain compared with controls. Due to heterogeneous test parameters and methods, no conclusion regarding differences in conjunct motion, tracking a motion pattern, and measures of posture could be drawn.CONCLUSIONS: People with neck pain appear to have reduced active RoM, movement speed, and head repositioning accuracy when compared with controls. However, quality of reviewed studies was low and better descriptions of participants and methods are required before firm conclusions can be drawn.

AB - BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a major public health problem. Our objective was to describe differences in measures of movement and posture between people with and without neck pain.METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched before 15 February 2019 for studies comparing people with neck pain with controls using electronic measurements of neck movement and/or posture. Data were extracted on participants, device, test methods, active range of motion (RoM) and quality of motion, joint positioning sense, and posture. Study quality was assessed using the quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy included in systematic reviews (QUADAS) and Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) guidelines.RESULTS: Thirty-six studies were included: 24 studies included measurement of active RoM, 15 quality of motion, 12 joint positioning sense, and 5 cervical spine posture. Measurements and test methods were heterogeneous. The reporting of study populations and methods were poor, whereas devices and statistics were well described. All studies on RoM showed reduced active RoM in people with neck pain when compared with controls, 5 of 10 studies reported reduced movement speed for people with neck pain, and 5 of 9 studies reported significantly greater joint positioning error for people with neck pain compared with controls. Due to heterogeneous test parameters and methods, no conclusion regarding differences in conjunct motion, tracking a motion pattern, and measures of posture could be drawn.CONCLUSIONS: People with neck pain appear to have reduced active RoM, movement speed, and head repositioning accuracy when compared with controls. However, quality of reviewed studies was low and better descriptions of participants and methods are required before firm conclusions can be drawn.

U2 - 10.1186/s13643-019-1125-2

DO - 10.1186/s13643-019-1125-2

M3 - Review

VL - 8

JO - Systematic Reviews

JF - Systematic Reviews

SN - 2046-4053

IS - 1

M1 - 220

ER -