Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

Bibi Gram, Christoffer Højnicke Andersen, Mette Kreutzfeldt Zebis, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup Bredahl, mogens Pedersen, Ole S. Mortensen, Rigmor H. Jensen, Lars L. Andersen, Gisela Sjøgaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0-9) and headache (scale 0-10). Results. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant decrease in neck pain intensity the last 7 days in 3MS compared with REF: -0.5 ± 0.2 (P < 0.02) and a tendency for 3WS versus REF: -0.4 ± 0.2 (P < 0.07). Intensity of headache the last month decreased in both training groups: 3WS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001) and 3MS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001). Additionally, days of headache decreased 1.0 ± 0.5 in 3WS and 1.3 ± 0.5 in 3MS versus REF. There were no differences between the two training groups for any of the variables. Conclusion. Neck/shoulder training at the workplace reduced neck pain and headache among office workers independently of the extent of supervision. This finding has important practical implications for future workplace interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number693013
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2014
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19. Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Shoulder Pain
Resistance Training
Neck Pain
Randomized Controlled Trials
Workplace
Intention to Treat Analysis

Keywords

  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Neck Pain/epidemiology
  • Shoulder Pain/epidemiology
  • Teaching
  • Workplace

Cite this

@article{fdca77ab3eb64591aabe345fd361540d,
title = "Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial",
abstract = "Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0-9) and headache (scale 0-10). Results. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant decrease in neck pain intensity the last 7 days in 3MS compared with REF: -0.5 ± 0.2 (P < 0.02) and a tendency for 3WS versus REF: -0.4 ± 0.2 (P < 0.07). Intensity of headache the last month decreased in both training groups: 3WS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001) and 3MS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001). Additionally, days of headache decreased 1.0 ± 0.5 in 3WS and 1.3 ± 0.5 in 3MS versus REF. There were no differences between the two training groups for any of the variables. Conclusion. Neck/shoulder training at the workplace reduced neck pain and headache among office workers independently of the extent of supervision. This finding has important practical implications for future workplace interventions.",
keywords = "Female, Humans, Male, Neck Pain/epidemiology, Shoulder Pain/epidemiology, Teaching, Workplace",
author = "Bibi Gram and Andersen, {Christoffer H{\o}jnicke} and Zebis, {Mette Kreutzfeldt} and Bredahl, {Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup} and mogens Pedersen and Mortensen, {Ole S.} and Jensen, {Rigmor H.} and Andersen, {Lars L.} and Gisela Sj{\o}gaard",
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month = "2",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1155/2014/693013",
language = "English",
volume = "2014",
journal = "BioMed Research International",
issn = "2314-6133",
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Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers : Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial. / Gram, Bibi; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup; Pedersen, mogens; Mortensen, Ole S.; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Andersen, Lars L.; Sjøgaard, Gisela.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2014, 693013, 19.02.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of Training Supervision on Effectiveness of Strength Training for Reducing Neck/Shoulder Pain and Headache in Office Workers

T2 - Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

AU - Gram, Bibi

AU - Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke

AU - Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

AU - Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup

AU - Pedersen, mogens

AU - Mortensen, Ole S.

AU - Jensen, Rigmor H.

AU - Andersen, Lars L.

AU - Sjøgaard, Gisela

PY - 2014/2/19

Y1 - 2014/2/19

N2 - Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0-9) and headache (scale 0-10). Results. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant decrease in neck pain intensity the last 7 days in 3MS compared with REF: -0.5 ± 0.2 (P < 0.02) and a tendency for 3WS versus REF: -0.4 ± 0.2 (P < 0.07). Intensity of headache the last month decreased in both training groups: 3WS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001) and 3MS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001). Additionally, days of headache decreased 1.0 ± 0.5 in 3WS and 1.3 ± 0.5 in 3MS versus REF. There were no differences between the two training groups for any of the variables. Conclusion. Neck/shoulder training at the workplace reduced neck pain and headache among office workers independently of the extent of supervision. This finding has important practical implications for future workplace interventions.

AB - Objective. To investigate the effect of workplace neck/shoulder strength training with and without regular supervision on neck/shoulder pain and headache among office workers. Method. A 20-week cluster randomized controlled trial among 351 office workers was randomized into three groups: two training groups with the same total amount of planned exercises three times per week (1) with supervision (3WS) throughout the intervention period, (2) with minimal supervision (3MS) only initially, and (3) a reference group (REF). Main outcome is self-reported pain intensity in neck and shoulder (scale 0-9) and headache (scale 0-10). Results. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant decrease in neck pain intensity the last 7 days in 3MS compared with REF: -0.5 ± 0.2 (P < 0.02) and a tendency for 3WS versus REF: -0.4 ± 0.2 (P < 0.07). Intensity of headache the last month decreased in both training groups: 3WS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001) and 3MS versus REF: -1.1 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001). Additionally, days of headache decreased 1.0 ± 0.5 in 3WS and 1.3 ± 0.5 in 3MS versus REF. There were no differences between the two training groups for any of the variables. Conclusion. Neck/shoulder training at the workplace reduced neck pain and headache among office workers independently of the extent of supervision. This finding has important practical implications for future workplace interventions.

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Neck Pain/epidemiology

KW - Shoulder Pain/epidemiology

KW - Teaching

KW - Workplace

U2 - 10.1155/2014/693013

DO - 10.1155/2014/693013

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24701581

VL - 2014

JO - BioMed Research International

JF - BioMed Research International

SN - 2314-6133

M1 - 693013

ER -