Effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change and self-rated health in the working life

Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup Bredahl, Carina Jönsson, Lars Andersen, Gisela Sjøgaard

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

Abstract

Introduction
The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 20 weeks of strengths training on readiness to change and self-rated health, amongst laboratory technicians with industrial repetitive work.
Methods
A cluster randomised controlled trial was performed with an intervention group (IG)(n=282) and a control group (CG)(n=255). The IG performed five specific strengthening exercises for the neck-shoulder region, three times a week for approximately 20 minutes, during working hours. Participants replied to a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. The main objectives were changes in readiness to change, self-rated health, strengths and fitness.
Results
The IG had a statistical significant higher readiness to change after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, whereas no statistical significance was found for the CG, with mean values of intervention (3.72±1.53 vs. 3.89±1.44) and control (3.79±1.42 vs. 3.82±1.48). However, the increase in readiness to change in the IG was not statistically significant compared to the CG (p=0.238), with delta values of (0.17±1.16 vs. 0.03±1.20).
The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated health after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no increase was found for the CG, with mean values of (3.63±0.72 vs. 3.79±0.75) and (3.65±0.82 vs. 3.65±0.85). Increase in self-rated health in the IG was statistically significant higher compared to the CG, with delta values of (0.16±0.69 vs. 0.01±0.63, p=0.019).
The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated strength after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no statistically significant increase could be found in the CG, with mean values of (5.82±1.80 vs. 6.25±1.81) and (5.75±2.12 vs. 5.84±2.01). The increase in the IG was statistically significant compared to the CG with delta values (0.42±1.33 vs. 0.09±1.41, p=0.013). Both the intervention and the CG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated fitness after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, with mean values of (5.72±2.05 vs. 6.02±2.06) and (5.59±2.31 vs. 5.76±2.29). The increase in self-rated fitness was not statistically significantly larger in the IG compared to the CG (0.29±1.41 vs. 0.18±1.26, p=0.364).
Discussion
The study has shown that specific resistance training has a positive effect on self-rated health, self-rated strength and self-rated fitness. However, the study did not show any significant effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change, perhaps because the participants entering the study were already selected on a high preference for exercising.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date5. Jul 2011
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 5. Jul 2011
EventECSS 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. - Liverpool, United Kingdom
Duration: 5. Jul 20119. Jul 2011

Conference

ConferenceECSS 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science.
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLiverpool
Period05/07/201109/07/2011

Cite this

Bredahl, T. V. G., Jönsson, C., Andersen, L., & Sjøgaard, G. (2011). Effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change and self-rated health in the working life. Abstract from ECSS 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. , Liverpool, United Kingdom.
Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup ; Jönsson, Carina ; Andersen, Lars ; Sjøgaard, Gisela. / Effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change and self-rated health in the working life. Abstract from ECSS 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. , Liverpool, United Kingdom.1 p.
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abstract = "Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 20 weeks of strengths training on readiness to change and self-rated health, amongst laboratory technicians with industrial repetitive work. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial was performed with an intervention group (IG)(n=282) and a control group (CG)(n=255). The IG performed five specific strengthening exercises for the neck-shoulder region, three times a week for approximately 20 minutes, during working hours. Participants replied to a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. The main objectives were changes in readiness to change, self-rated health, strengths and fitness. Results The IG had a statistical significant higher readiness to change after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, whereas no statistical significance was found for the CG, with mean values of intervention (3.72±1.53 vs. 3.89±1.44) and control (3.79±1.42 vs. 3.82±1.48). However, the increase in readiness to change in the IG was not statistically significant compared to the CG (p=0.238), with delta values of (0.17±1.16 vs. 0.03±1.20). The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated health after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no increase was found for the CG, with mean values of (3.63±0.72 vs. 3.79±0.75) and (3.65±0.82 vs. 3.65±0.85). Increase in self-rated health in the IG was statistically significant higher compared to the CG, with delta values of (0.16±0.69 vs. 0.01±0.63, p=0.019). The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated strength after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no statistically significant increase could be found in the CG, with mean values of (5.82±1.80 vs. 6.25±1.81) and (5.75±2.12 vs. 5.84±2.01). The increase in the IG was statistically significant compared to the CG with delta values (0.42±1.33 vs. 0.09±1.41, p=0.013). Both the intervention and the CG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated fitness after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, with mean values of (5.72±2.05 vs. 6.02±2.06) and (5.59±2.31 vs. 5.76±2.29). The increase in self-rated fitness was not statistically significantly larger in the IG compared to the CG (0.29±1.41 vs. 0.18±1.26, p=0.364). Discussion The study has shown that specific resistance training has a positive effect on self-rated health, self-rated strength and self-rated fitness. However, the study did not show any significant effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change, perhaps because the participants entering the study were already selected on a high preference for exercising.",
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Bredahl, TVG, Jönsson, C, Andersen, L & Sjøgaard, G 2011, 'Effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change and self-rated health in the working life', ECSS 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. , Liverpool, United Kingdom, 05/07/2011 - 09/07/2011.

Effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change and self-rated health in the working life. / Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup; Jönsson, Carina; Andersen, Lars; Sjøgaard, Gisela.

2011. Abstract from ECSS 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. , Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

TY - ABST

T1 - Effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change and self-rated health in the working life

AU - Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup

AU - Jönsson, Carina

AU - Andersen, Lars

AU - Sjøgaard, Gisela

PY - 2011/7/5

Y1 - 2011/7/5

N2 - Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 20 weeks of strengths training on readiness to change and self-rated health, amongst laboratory technicians with industrial repetitive work. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial was performed with an intervention group (IG)(n=282) and a control group (CG)(n=255). The IG performed five specific strengthening exercises for the neck-shoulder region, three times a week for approximately 20 minutes, during working hours. Participants replied to a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. The main objectives were changes in readiness to change, self-rated health, strengths and fitness. Results The IG had a statistical significant higher readiness to change after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, whereas no statistical significance was found for the CG, with mean values of intervention (3.72±1.53 vs. 3.89±1.44) and control (3.79±1.42 vs. 3.82±1.48). However, the increase in readiness to change in the IG was not statistically significant compared to the CG (p=0.238), with delta values of (0.17±1.16 vs. 0.03±1.20). The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated health after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no increase was found for the CG, with mean values of (3.63±0.72 vs. 3.79±0.75) and (3.65±0.82 vs. 3.65±0.85). Increase in self-rated health in the IG was statistically significant higher compared to the CG, with delta values of (0.16±0.69 vs. 0.01±0.63, p=0.019). The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated strength after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no statistically significant increase could be found in the CG, with mean values of (5.82±1.80 vs. 6.25±1.81) and (5.75±2.12 vs. 5.84±2.01). The increase in the IG was statistically significant compared to the CG with delta values (0.42±1.33 vs. 0.09±1.41, p=0.013). Both the intervention and the CG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated fitness after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, with mean values of (5.72±2.05 vs. 6.02±2.06) and (5.59±2.31 vs. 5.76±2.29). The increase in self-rated fitness was not statistically significantly larger in the IG compared to the CG (0.29±1.41 vs. 0.18±1.26, p=0.364). Discussion The study has shown that specific resistance training has a positive effect on self-rated health, self-rated strength and self-rated fitness. However, the study did not show any significant effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change, perhaps because the participants entering the study were already selected on a high preference for exercising.

AB - Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 20 weeks of strengths training on readiness to change and self-rated health, amongst laboratory technicians with industrial repetitive work. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial was performed with an intervention group (IG)(n=282) and a control group (CG)(n=255). The IG performed five specific strengthening exercises for the neck-shoulder region, three times a week for approximately 20 minutes, during working hours. Participants replied to a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. The main objectives were changes in readiness to change, self-rated health, strengths and fitness. Results The IG had a statistical significant higher readiness to change after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, whereas no statistical significance was found for the CG, with mean values of intervention (3.72±1.53 vs. 3.89±1.44) and control (3.79±1.42 vs. 3.82±1.48). However, the increase in readiness to change in the IG was not statistically significant compared to the CG (p=0.238), with delta values of (0.17±1.16 vs. 0.03±1.20). The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated health after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no increase was found for the CG, with mean values of (3.63±0.72 vs. 3.79±0.75) and (3.65±0.82 vs. 3.65±0.85). Increase in self-rated health in the IG was statistically significant higher compared to the CG, with delta values of (0.16±0.69 vs. 0.01±0.63, p=0.019). The IG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated strength after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, while no statistically significant increase could be found in the CG, with mean values of (5.82±1.80 vs. 6.25±1.81) and (5.75±2.12 vs. 5.84±2.01). The increase in the IG was statistically significant compared to the CG with delta values (0.42±1.33 vs. 0.09±1.41, p=0.013). Both the intervention and the CG had a statistically significant increase in self-rated fitness after 20 weeks of training compared to baseline, with mean values of (5.72±2.05 vs. 6.02±2.06) and (5.59±2.31 vs. 5.76±2.29). The increase in self-rated fitness was not statistically significantly larger in the IG compared to the CG (0.29±1.41 vs. 0.18±1.26, p=0.364). Discussion The study has shown that specific resistance training has a positive effect on self-rated health, self-rated strength and self-rated fitness. However, the study did not show any significant effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change, perhaps because the participants entering the study were already selected on a high preference for exercising.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Bredahl TVG, Jönsson C, Andersen L, Sjøgaard G. Effect of specific resistance training on readiness to change and self-rated health in the working life. 2011. Abstract from ECSS 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. , Liverpool, United Kingdom.