Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: dose-response relationship

Mogens Theisen Pedersen, Lars L Andersen, Marie B Jørgensen, Karen Søgaard, Gisela Sjøgaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Pedersen, MT, Andersen, LL, Jørgensen, MB, Søgaard, K, and Sjøgaard, G. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: Dose-response relationship. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 229-235, 2013-The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response of strength training for relieving musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The relation between the dose of training in terms of total training volume (sets × repetitions × load reported in training diaries) during a 16-week strength training program and changes in pain (calculated as pain index, 0-100%, from self-reported intensities and durations of pain in the upper body and low back) was determined by regression analysis. The women were part of a randomized controlled trial with specific strength training (SRT), all-round physical exercise (APE), and a reference group (REF). Results showed that pain index in SRT and APE decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up (-25%/-22%) compared with changes in REF (-15%). In the dose-response analysis within the SRT group (n = 125), the total volume of training (mean 18.056 kg, SD = 13.798) was negatively correlated with changes in pain index (β = -0.16, p = 0.045), and there was a significant dose-response relationship between training volume per session and change in pain index (β = -0.20, p = 0.034). In contrast, training attendance (mean 1.69 sessions per week, SD = 0.8) was not significantly related to the change in pain index. In conclusion, achieving higher accumulated training volumes was important for reducing musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The training volume per session should be optimized by securing a load at 10-15 repetition maximum and adhering to principles of progressive overload.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume27
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)229-35
Number of pages7
ISSN1064-8011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

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Resistance Training
Exercise
Randomized Controlled Trials
Regression Analysis
Education

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title = "Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: dose-response relationship",
abstract = "ABSTRACT: Pedersen, MT, Andersen, LL, J{\o}rgensen, MB, S{\o}gaard, K, and Sj{\o}gaard, G. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: Dose-response relationship. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 229-235, 2013-The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response of strength training for relieving musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The relation between the dose of training in terms of total training volume (sets × repetitions × load reported in training diaries) during a 16-week strength training program and changes in pain (calculated as pain index, 0-100{\%}, from self-reported intensities and durations of pain in the upper body and low back) was determined by regression analysis. The women were part of a randomized controlled trial with specific strength training (SRT), all-round physical exercise (APE), and a reference group (REF). Results showed that pain index in SRT and APE decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up (-25{\%}/-22{\%}) compared with changes in REF (-15{\%}). In the dose-response analysis within the SRT group (n = 125), the total volume of training (mean 18.056 kg, SD = 13.798) was negatively correlated with changes in pain index (β = -0.16, p = 0.045), and there was a significant dose-response relationship between training volume per session and change in pain index (β = -0.20, p = 0.034). In contrast, training attendance (mean 1.69 sessions per week, SD = 0.8) was not significantly related to the change in pain index. In conclusion, achieving higher accumulated training volumes was important for reducing musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The training volume per session should be optimized by securing a load at 10-15 repetition maximum and adhering to principles of progressive overload.",
author = "Pedersen, {Mogens Theisen} and Andersen, {Lars L} and J{\o}rgensen, {Marie B} and Karen S{\o}gaard and Gisela Sj{\o}gaard",
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Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms : dose-response relationship. / Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Andersen, Lars L; Jørgensen, Marie B; Søgaard, Karen; Sjøgaard, Gisela.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 229-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms

T2 - dose-response relationship

AU - Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

AU - Andersen, Lars L

AU - Jørgensen, Marie B

AU - Søgaard, Karen

AU - Sjøgaard, Gisela

PY - 2013/1

Y1 - 2013/1

N2 - ABSTRACT: Pedersen, MT, Andersen, LL, Jørgensen, MB, Søgaard, K, and Sjøgaard, G. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: Dose-response relationship. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 229-235, 2013-The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response of strength training for relieving musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The relation between the dose of training in terms of total training volume (sets × repetitions × load reported in training diaries) during a 16-week strength training program and changes in pain (calculated as pain index, 0-100%, from self-reported intensities and durations of pain in the upper body and low back) was determined by regression analysis. The women were part of a randomized controlled trial with specific strength training (SRT), all-round physical exercise (APE), and a reference group (REF). Results showed that pain index in SRT and APE decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up (-25%/-22%) compared with changes in REF (-15%). In the dose-response analysis within the SRT group (n = 125), the total volume of training (mean 18.056 kg, SD = 13.798) was negatively correlated with changes in pain index (β = -0.16, p = 0.045), and there was a significant dose-response relationship between training volume per session and change in pain index (β = -0.20, p = 0.034). In contrast, training attendance (mean 1.69 sessions per week, SD = 0.8) was not significantly related to the change in pain index. In conclusion, achieving higher accumulated training volumes was important for reducing musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The training volume per session should be optimized by securing a load at 10-15 repetition maximum and adhering to principles of progressive overload.

AB - ABSTRACT: Pedersen, MT, Andersen, LL, Jørgensen, MB, Søgaard, K, and Sjøgaard, G. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: Dose-response relationship. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 229-235, 2013-The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response of strength training for relieving musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The relation between the dose of training in terms of total training volume (sets × repetitions × load reported in training diaries) during a 16-week strength training program and changes in pain (calculated as pain index, 0-100%, from self-reported intensities and durations of pain in the upper body and low back) was determined by regression analysis. The women were part of a randomized controlled trial with specific strength training (SRT), all-round physical exercise (APE), and a reference group (REF). Results showed that pain index in SRT and APE decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up (-25%/-22%) compared with changes in REF (-15%). In the dose-response analysis within the SRT group (n = 125), the total volume of training (mean 18.056 kg, SD = 13.798) was negatively correlated with changes in pain index (β = -0.16, p = 0.045), and there was a significant dose-response relationship between training volume per session and change in pain index (β = -0.20, p = 0.034). In contrast, training attendance (mean 1.69 sessions per week, SD = 0.8) was not significantly related to the change in pain index. In conclusion, achieving higher accumulated training volumes was important for reducing musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The training volume per session should be optimized by securing a load at 10-15 repetition maximum and adhering to principles of progressive overload.

U2 - 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182541ceb

DO - 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182541ceb

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 23254492

VL - 27

SP - 229

EP - 235

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

IS - 1

ER -