Early-life programming of pain sensation?

Spinal pain in pre-adolescents with pain experience in early life

Anne Cathrine Jørgensen, Raquel Lucas, Lise Hestbaek, Per Kragh Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Neurobiological mechanisms can be involved in early programming of pain sensitization. We aimed to investigate the association between early-life pain experience and pre-adolescence spinal pain. We conducted a study of 29,861 pre-adolescents (age 11-14) from the Danish National Birth Cohort. As indicators of early-life pain, we used infantile colic and recurrent otitis media, reported by mothers when their children were 6 and 18 months. Self-reported spinal pain (neck, middle back, and/or low back pain) was obtained in the 11-year follow-up, classified according to severity. Associations between early-life pain and spinal pain in pre-adolescents were estimated using multinomial logistic regression models. To account for sample selection, inverse probability weighting was applied. Children experiencing pain in early life were more likely to report severe spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The association appeared stronger with exposure to two pain exposures (relative risk ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02-1.68) rather than one (relative risk ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.05-1.24). We observed similar results when using headache and abdominal pain as outcome measures, underpinning a potential neurobiological or psychosocial link in programming of pain sensitization.Conclusion: Experience of early-life pain is seemingly associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The study highlights that early-life painful experiences can influence programming of future pain responses.What is Known:• Spinal pain in pre-adolescents is common, causes marked discomfort and impairment in everyday life, and may be an important predictor of spinal pain later in life.• Neurobiological mechanisms have been suggested as involved in early programming of pain sensitization.What is New:• Pain exposure in early postnatal life in terms of infantile colic and recurrent otitis media is associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence; thus, experience of such painful conditions in the early postnatal period may seemingly influence programming of future pain sensation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume178
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)1903-1911
ISSN0340-6199
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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Colic
Otitis Media
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Neck Pain
Low Back Pain
Mothers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Cite this

Jørgensen, Anne Cathrine ; Lucas, Raquel ; Hestbaek, Lise ; Andersen, Per Kragh ; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie. / Early-life programming of pain sensation? Spinal pain in pre-adolescents with pain experience in early life. In: European Journal of Pediatrics. 2019 ; Vol. 178, No. 12. pp. 1903-1911.
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title = "Early-life programming of pain sensation?: Spinal pain in pre-adolescents with pain experience in early life",
abstract = "Neurobiological mechanisms can be involved in early programming of pain sensitization. We aimed to investigate the association between early-life pain experience and pre-adolescence spinal pain. We conducted a study of 29,861 pre-adolescents (age 11-14) from the Danish National Birth Cohort. As indicators of early-life pain, we used infantile colic and recurrent otitis media, reported by mothers when their children were 6 and 18 months. Self-reported spinal pain (neck, middle back, and/or low back pain) was obtained in the 11-year follow-up, classified according to severity. Associations between early-life pain and spinal pain in pre-adolescents were estimated using multinomial logistic regression models. To account for sample selection, inverse probability weighting was applied. Children experiencing pain in early life were more likely to report severe spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The association appeared stronger with exposure to two pain exposures (relative risk ratio, 1.31; 95{\%} CI, 1.02-1.68) rather than one (relative risk ratio, 1.14; 95{\%} CI, 1.05-1.24). We observed similar results when using headache and abdominal pain as outcome measures, underpinning a potential neurobiological or psychosocial link in programming of pain sensitization.Conclusion: Experience of early-life pain is seemingly associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The study highlights that early-life painful experiences can influence programming of future pain responses.What is Known:• Spinal pain in pre-adolescents is common, causes marked discomfort and impairment in everyday life, and may be an important predictor of spinal pain later in life.• Neurobiological mechanisms have been suggested as involved in early programming of pain sensitization.What is New:• Pain exposure in early postnatal life in terms of infantile colic and recurrent otitis media is associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence; thus, experience of such painful conditions in the early postnatal period may seemingly influence programming of future pain sensation.",
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Early-life programming of pain sensation? Spinal pain in pre-adolescents with pain experience in early life. / Jørgensen, Anne Cathrine; Lucas, Raquel; Hestbaek, Lise; Andersen, Per Kragh; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie.

In: European Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 178, No. 12, 12.2019, p. 1903-1911.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early-life programming of pain sensation?

T2 - Spinal pain in pre-adolescents with pain experience in early life

AU - Jørgensen, Anne Cathrine

AU - Lucas, Raquel

AU - Hestbaek, Lise

AU - Andersen, Per Kragh

AU - Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - Neurobiological mechanisms can be involved in early programming of pain sensitization. We aimed to investigate the association between early-life pain experience and pre-adolescence spinal pain. We conducted a study of 29,861 pre-adolescents (age 11-14) from the Danish National Birth Cohort. As indicators of early-life pain, we used infantile colic and recurrent otitis media, reported by mothers when their children were 6 and 18 months. Self-reported spinal pain (neck, middle back, and/or low back pain) was obtained in the 11-year follow-up, classified according to severity. Associations between early-life pain and spinal pain in pre-adolescents were estimated using multinomial logistic regression models. To account for sample selection, inverse probability weighting was applied. Children experiencing pain in early life were more likely to report severe spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The association appeared stronger with exposure to two pain exposures (relative risk ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02-1.68) rather than one (relative risk ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.05-1.24). We observed similar results when using headache and abdominal pain as outcome measures, underpinning a potential neurobiological or psychosocial link in programming of pain sensitization.Conclusion: Experience of early-life pain is seemingly associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The study highlights that early-life painful experiences can influence programming of future pain responses.What is Known:• Spinal pain in pre-adolescents is common, causes marked discomfort and impairment in everyday life, and may be an important predictor of spinal pain later in life.• Neurobiological mechanisms have been suggested as involved in early programming of pain sensitization.What is New:• Pain exposure in early postnatal life in terms of infantile colic and recurrent otitis media is associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence; thus, experience of such painful conditions in the early postnatal period may seemingly influence programming of future pain sensation.

AB - Neurobiological mechanisms can be involved in early programming of pain sensitization. We aimed to investigate the association between early-life pain experience and pre-adolescence spinal pain. We conducted a study of 29,861 pre-adolescents (age 11-14) from the Danish National Birth Cohort. As indicators of early-life pain, we used infantile colic and recurrent otitis media, reported by mothers when their children were 6 and 18 months. Self-reported spinal pain (neck, middle back, and/or low back pain) was obtained in the 11-year follow-up, classified according to severity. Associations between early-life pain and spinal pain in pre-adolescents were estimated using multinomial logistic regression models. To account for sample selection, inverse probability weighting was applied. Children experiencing pain in early life were more likely to report severe spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The association appeared stronger with exposure to two pain exposures (relative risk ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.02-1.68) rather than one (relative risk ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.05-1.24). We observed similar results when using headache and abdominal pain as outcome measures, underpinning a potential neurobiological or psychosocial link in programming of pain sensitization.Conclusion: Experience of early-life pain is seemingly associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence. The study highlights that early-life painful experiences can influence programming of future pain responses.What is Known:• Spinal pain in pre-adolescents is common, causes marked discomfort and impairment in everyday life, and may be an important predictor of spinal pain later in life.• Neurobiological mechanisms have been suggested as involved in early programming of pain sensitization.What is New:• Pain exposure in early postnatal life in terms of infantile colic and recurrent otitis media is associated with spinal pain in pre-adolescence; thus, experience of such painful conditions in the early postnatal period may seemingly influence programming of future pain sensation.

U2 - 10.1007/s00431-019-03475-9

DO - 10.1007/s00431-019-03475-9

M3 - Journal article

VL - 178

SP - 1903

EP - 1911

JO - European Journal of Pediatrics

JF - European Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0340-6199

IS - 12

ER -