Does physical performance and muscle strength predict future personal and nursing care services in community-dwelling older adults aged 75+?

Jonathan Vaarst, Eleanor Boyle, Sonja Vestergaard, Lars G. Hvid, Elsa S. Strotmeyer, Nancy W. Glynn, Paolo Caserotti*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate if grip strength or the short physical performance battery could predict the rate of receiving two different types of home care services: (a) personal care and (b) home nursing care for community-dwelling older adults aged 75+ years. Methods: A secondary data analysis of a prospective cohort study including 323 community-dwelling older adults. Measures of grip strength and the short physical performance battery were incorporated in a nationally regulated preventive home visit programme. Referral to personal and home nursing care were obtained from an administrative database with an average follow-up of 4.1 years. The rate of receiving the individual home care services and the study measures were determined using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models controlling for a priori selected covariates (age, sex, living status, obesity, smoking and prior use of home care). Results: The mean age was 81.7 years with 58.8% being women. The rate of receiving personal care differed between the short physical performance battery groups but not between the grip strength groups after adjusting for all covariates with hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 1.90 (1.29–2.81) and 1.41 (0.95–2.08), respectively. The rate of receiving home nursing care differed between both the short physical performance battery and grip strength groups after adjusting for all covariates with hazard ratios of 2.03 (1.41–2.94) and 1.48 (1.01–2.16), respectively. Conclusions: The short physical performance battery was associated with the rate of receiving both personal care and home nursing care. The short physical performance battery can be used to predict home care needs of community-dwelling older adults aged 75+ years.

Original languageEnglish
Book seriesScandinavian Journal of Public Health
ISSN1403-4948
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 19. Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Aged
  • healthcare services
  • home care services
  • long-term care
  • muscle strength
  • older adults
  • physical function
  • preventive home visit
  • short physical performance battery

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