Diverse methodological approaches to a Circumpolar multi-site case study which upholds and responds to local and Indigenous community research processes in the Arctic

Gwen K. Healey Akearok*, Ay’aqulluk Jim Chaliak, Katie Cueva, David Cook, Christina V.L. Larsen, Lára Jóhannsdóttir, Lena Maria Nilsson, Miguel San Sebastián, Malory Peterson, Ulla Timlin, Ann Ragnhild Broderstadt, Inger Dagsvold, Susanna Siri, Ingelise Olesen, Jon Petter A. Stoor, Arja Rautio, Elizabeth Rink, Josée G. Lavoie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper outlines the methodological approaches to a multi-site Circumpolar case study exploring the impacts of COVID-19 on Indigenous and remote communities in 7 of 8 Arctic countries. Researchers involved with the project implemented a three-phase multi-site case study to assess the positive and negative societal outcomes associated with the COVID-19 pandemic in Arctic communities from 2020 to 2023. The goal of the multi-site case study was to identify community-driven models and evidence-based promising practices and recommendations that can help inform cohesive and coordinated public health responses and protocols related to future public health emergencies in the Arctic. Research sites included a minimum of 1 one community each from Canada (Nunavut,) United States of America (Alaska), Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland. The approaches used for our multi-site case study provide a comprehensive, evidence-based account of the complex health challenges facing Arctic communities, offering insights into the effectiveness of interventions, while also privileging Indigenous local knowledge and voices. The mixed method multi-site case study approach enriched the understanding of unique regional health disparities and strengths during the pandemic. These methodological approaches serve as a valuable resource for policymakers, researchers, and healthcare professionals, informing future strategies and interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2336284
JournalInternational Journal of Circumpolar Health
Volume83
Issue number1
ISSN1239-9736
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Keywords

  • arctic
  • arctic research
  • circumpolar
  • community-based research
  • Indigenous peoples
  • mixed methods
  • research methods

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