Disruptive technologies and abundance in the service sector - toward a refined technology acceptance model

Lisa Schmidthuber*, Daniela Maresch, Michael Ginner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Mobile payment provides every mobile device user the opportunity to conduct commercial transactions without cash or cards. While mobile payment is already the dominant payment type in Asia, it is still in its infancy in Europe despite a high mobile phone penetration rate and service providers’ considerable investments in the technology. Mobile payment is therefore a recent example of the puzzle of abundance—a phenomenon describing a situation in which the potential of a new disruptive technology is not tapped by the masses even though it offers substantial benefits to them. In this study, we address this puzzle by investigating the factors influencing the intention to use a disruptive technology. We draw on the example of mobile payment and develop and test a refined technology acceptance model. Results indicate that the intention to use mobile payment services is positively affected by perceived usefulness, perceived compatibility, perceived personal innovativeness, and perceived social influence, but is negatively affected by perceived risk. Both perceived costs and perceived risk mitigate the positive impact of several other characteristics. Our findings provide points of leverage to better tap the potential of mobile payment in contexts such as Europe.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTechnological Forecasting and Social Change
ISSN0040-1625
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2018

Fingerprint

Mobile phones
Mobile devices
Equipment and Supplies
Technology acceptance model
Mobile payment
Service sector
Disruptive technology
Costs
Perceived risk
Intention to use
Perceived usefulness
Leverage
Social influence
Personal innovativeness
Influencing factors
Asia
Penetration
Payment
Service provider
Mobile phone

Keywords

  • Behavioral intention
  • Innovation adoption
  • Mobile payment
  • Mobile technology
  • Technology acceptance

Cite this

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title = "Disruptive technologies and abundance in the service sector - toward a refined technology acceptance model",
abstract = "Mobile payment provides every mobile device user the opportunity to conduct commercial transactions without cash or cards. While mobile payment is already the dominant payment type in Asia, it is still in its infancy in Europe despite a high mobile phone penetration rate and service providers’ considerable investments in the technology. Mobile payment is therefore a recent example of the puzzle of abundance—a phenomenon describing a situation in which the potential of a new disruptive technology is not tapped by the masses even though it offers substantial benefits to them. In this study, we address this puzzle by investigating the factors influencing the intention to use a disruptive technology. We draw on the example of mobile payment and develop and test a refined technology acceptance model. Results indicate that the intention to use mobile payment services is positively affected by perceived usefulness, perceived compatibility, perceived personal innovativeness, and perceived social influence, but is negatively affected by perceived risk. Both perceived costs and perceived risk mitigate the positive impact of several other characteristics. Our findings provide points of leverage to better tap the potential of mobile payment in contexts such as Europe.",
keywords = "Behavioral intention, Innovation adoption, Mobile payment, Mobile technology, Technology acceptance",
author = "Lisa Schmidthuber and Daniela Maresch and Michael Ginner",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.techfore.2018.06.017",
language = "English",
journal = "Technological Forecasting and Social Change",
issn = "0040-1625",
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Disruptive technologies and abundance in the service sector - toward a refined technology acceptance model. / Schmidthuber, Lisa; Maresch, Daniela; Ginner, Michael.

In: Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disruptive technologies and abundance in the service sector - toward a refined technology acceptance model

AU - Schmidthuber, Lisa

AU - Maresch, Daniela

AU - Ginner, Michael

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Mobile payment provides every mobile device user the opportunity to conduct commercial transactions without cash or cards. While mobile payment is already the dominant payment type in Asia, it is still in its infancy in Europe despite a high mobile phone penetration rate and service providers’ considerable investments in the technology. Mobile payment is therefore a recent example of the puzzle of abundance—a phenomenon describing a situation in which the potential of a new disruptive technology is not tapped by the masses even though it offers substantial benefits to them. In this study, we address this puzzle by investigating the factors influencing the intention to use a disruptive technology. We draw on the example of mobile payment and develop and test a refined technology acceptance model. Results indicate that the intention to use mobile payment services is positively affected by perceived usefulness, perceived compatibility, perceived personal innovativeness, and perceived social influence, but is negatively affected by perceived risk. Both perceived costs and perceived risk mitigate the positive impact of several other characteristics. Our findings provide points of leverage to better tap the potential of mobile payment in contexts such as Europe.

AB - Mobile payment provides every mobile device user the opportunity to conduct commercial transactions without cash or cards. While mobile payment is already the dominant payment type in Asia, it is still in its infancy in Europe despite a high mobile phone penetration rate and service providers’ considerable investments in the technology. Mobile payment is therefore a recent example of the puzzle of abundance—a phenomenon describing a situation in which the potential of a new disruptive technology is not tapped by the masses even though it offers substantial benefits to them. In this study, we address this puzzle by investigating the factors influencing the intention to use a disruptive technology. We draw on the example of mobile payment and develop and test a refined technology acceptance model. Results indicate that the intention to use mobile payment services is positively affected by perceived usefulness, perceived compatibility, perceived personal innovativeness, and perceived social influence, but is negatively affected by perceived risk. Both perceived costs and perceived risk mitigate the positive impact of several other characteristics. Our findings provide points of leverage to better tap the potential of mobile payment in contexts such as Europe.

KW - Behavioral intention

KW - Innovation adoption

KW - Mobile payment

KW - Mobile technology

KW - Technology acceptance

U2 - 10.1016/j.techfore.2018.06.017

DO - 10.1016/j.techfore.2018.06.017

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SN - 0040-1625

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