Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes

effect of pH and temperature

I Plasencia, Lars Norlen, Luis Bagatolli

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The main function of skin is to serve as a physical barrier between the body and the environment. This barrier capacity is in turn a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is essentially composed of very long chain saturated ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. Three unsolved key questions are i), whether the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix is constituted by a single gel phase or by coexisting crystalline (solid) domains; ii), whether a separate liquid crystalline phase is present; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and two-photon excitation and laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that hydrated bilayers of human skin stratum corneum lipids express a giant sponge-like morphology with dimensions corresponding to the global three-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28 degrees C-32 degrees C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial resolution limit 300 nm) to a single gel phase at pH 7, coexistence of different gel phases between pH 5 and 6, and no fluid phase at any pH. This observation suggests that the local pH in the stratum corneum may control the physical properties of the extracellular lipid matrix by regulating membrane lateral structure and stability.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBiophysical Journal
Volume93
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)3142-3155
Number of pages13
ISSN0006-3495
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Membrane Lipids
Lipids
Skin
Fluorescence Microscopy
Skin Temperature
Porifera
Photons
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Confocal Microscopy
Membranes

Cite this

Plasencia, I ; Norlen, Lars ; Bagatolli, Luis. / Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes : effect of pH and temperature. In: Biophysical Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 93, No. 9. pp. 3142-3155.
@article{39738c80e07d11dca57f000ea68e967b,
title = "Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes: effect of pH and temperature",
abstract = "The main function of skin is to serve as a physical barrier between the body and the environment. This barrier capacity is in turn a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is essentially composed of very long chain saturated ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. Three unsolved key questions are i), whether the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix is constituted by a single gel phase or by coexisting crystalline (solid) domains; ii), whether a separate liquid crystalline phase is present; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and two-photon excitation and laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that hydrated bilayers of human skin stratum corneum lipids express a giant sponge-like morphology with dimensions corresponding to the global three-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28 degrees C-32 degrees C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial resolution limit 300 nm) to a single gel phase at pH 7, coexistence of different gel phases between pH 5 and 6, and no fluid phase at any pH. This observation suggests that the local pH in the stratum corneum may control the physical properties of the extracellular lipid matrix by regulating membrane lateral structure and stability.",
author = "I Plasencia and Lars Norlen and Luis Bagatolli",
note = "Paper id:: 17631535",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1529/biophysj.106.096164",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "3142--3155",
journal = "Biophysical Journal",
issn = "0006-3495",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "9",

}

Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes : effect of pH and temperature. / Plasencia, I; Norlen, Lars; Bagatolli, Luis.

In: Biophysical Journal, Vol. 93, No. 9, 01.11.2007, p. 3142-3155.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes

T2 - effect of pH and temperature

AU - Plasencia, I

AU - Norlen, Lars

AU - Bagatolli, Luis

N1 - Paper id:: 17631535

PY - 2007/11/1

Y1 - 2007/11/1

N2 - The main function of skin is to serve as a physical barrier between the body and the environment. This barrier capacity is in turn a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is essentially composed of very long chain saturated ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. Three unsolved key questions are i), whether the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix is constituted by a single gel phase or by coexisting crystalline (solid) domains; ii), whether a separate liquid crystalline phase is present; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and two-photon excitation and laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that hydrated bilayers of human skin stratum corneum lipids express a giant sponge-like morphology with dimensions corresponding to the global three-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28 degrees C-32 degrees C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial resolution limit 300 nm) to a single gel phase at pH 7, coexistence of different gel phases between pH 5 and 6, and no fluid phase at any pH. This observation suggests that the local pH in the stratum corneum may control the physical properties of the extracellular lipid matrix by regulating membrane lateral structure and stability.

AB - The main function of skin is to serve as a physical barrier between the body and the environment. This barrier capacity is in turn a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is essentially composed of very long chain saturated ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. Three unsolved key questions are i), whether the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix is constituted by a single gel phase or by coexisting crystalline (solid) domains; ii), whether a separate liquid crystalline phase is present; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and two-photon excitation and laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that hydrated bilayers of human skin stratum corneum lipids express a giant sponge-like morphology with dimensions corresponding to the global three-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28 degrees C-32 degrees C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial resolution limit 300 nm) to a single gel phase at pH 7, coexistence of different gel phases between pH 5 and 6, and no fluid phase at any pH. This observation suggests that the local pH in the stratum corneum may control the physical properties of the extracellular lipid matrix by regulating membrane lateral structure and stability.

U2 - 10.1529/biophysj.106.096164

DO - 10.1529/biophysj.106.096164

M3 - Journal article

VL - 93

SP - 3142

EP - 3155

JO - Biophysical Journal

JF - Biophysical Journal

SN - 0006-3495

IS - 9

ER -