Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activities among blue-collar workers

Tatiana O. Sato*, David M. Hallman, Jesper Kristiansen, Jørgen H. Skotte, Andreas Holtermann

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Purpose: The differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on cardiovascular health is termed the physical activity health paradox. Cardiac autonomic modulation could bring insights about the underlying mechanism behind this differential effect. The aim was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) during different activities (sitting, standing and moving) at work and leisure among blue-collar workers. Methods: One hundred thirty-eight workers from the NOMAD cohort were included. Data from physical activity and HRV were obtained for 3–4 days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) and a heart rate monitor (Actiheart). HRV indices were determined during sitting, standing and moving both at work and leisure. Linear mixed-models with two fixed factors (activities and domains) were applied to investigate differences in HRV indices adjusting for individual and occupational factors. Results: The results showed significant effects of domain (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), physical activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and interaction between domain and activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) on HRV indices. Mean heart rate (IBI) and parasympathetic measures of HRV (RMSSD and HF) were lower for sitting (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and higher for moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) during work compared with leisure, while no difference between domains was found for standing (p CloseSPigtSPi 0.05). Sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was higher during work for sitting and moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), but showed no difference for standing (p = 0.62). Conclusions: Differences in cardiac autonomic modulation between work and leisure were found, indicating sympathetic predominance during work and parasympathetic predominance during leisure for sitting. Autonomic responses can be part of the mechanism that explains the differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on health.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume91
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)293-304
ISSN0340-0131
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

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Leisure Activities
Health
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Heart rate variability
  • Objective measurements
  • Occupational health
  • Leisure Activities
  • Heart Rate/physiology
  • Occupational Health
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Exercise/physiology
  • Male
  • Posture/physiology
  • Denmark
  • Adult
  • Female
  • Aged
  • Autonomic Nervous System/physiology
  • Accelerometry
  • Cohort Studies

Cite this

Sato, Tatiana O. ; Hallman, David M. ; Kristiansen, Jesper ; Skotte, Jørgen H. ; Holtermann, Andreas. / Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activities among blue-collar workers. In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. 2018 ; Vol. 91, No. 3. pp. 293-304.
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abstract = "Purpose: The differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on cardiovascular health is termed the physical activity health paradox. Cardiac autonomic modulation could bring insights about the underlying mechanism behind this differential effect. The aim was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) during different activities (sitting, standing and moving) at work and leisure among blue-collar workers. Methods: One hundred thirty-eight workers from the NOMAD cohort were included. Data from physical activity and HRV were obtained for 3–4 days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) and a heart rate monitor (Actiheart). HRV indices were determined during sitting, standing and moving both at work and leisure. Linear mixed-models with two fixed factors (activities and domains) were applied to investigate differences in HRV indices adjusting for individual and occupational factors. Results: The results showed significant effects of domain (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), physical activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and interaction between domain and activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) on HRV indices. Mean heart rate (IBI) and parasympathetic measures of HRV (RMSSD and HF) were lower for sitting (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and higher for moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) during work compared with leisure, while no difference between domains was found for standing (p CloseSPigtSPi 0.05). Sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was higher during work for sitting and moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), but showed no difference for standing (p = 0.62). Conclusions: Differences in cardiac autonomic modulation between work and leisure were found, indicating sympathetic predominance during work and parasympathetic predominance during leisure for sitting. Autonomic responses can be part of the mechanism that explains the differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on health.",
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Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activities among blue-collar workers. / Sato, Tatiana O.; Hallman, David M.; Kristiansen, Jesper; Skotte, Jørgen H.; Holtermann, Andreas.

In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Vol. 91, No. 3, 04.2018, p. 293-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activities among blue-collar workers

AU - Sato, Tatiana O.

AU - Hallman, David M.

AU - Kristiansen, Jesper

AU - Skotte, Jørgen H.

AU - Holtermann, Andreas

PY - 2018/4

Y1 - 2018/4

N2 - Purpose: The differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on cardiovascular health is termed the physical activity health paradox. Cardiac autonomic modulation could bring insights about the underlying mechanism behind this differential effect. The aim was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) during different activities (sitting, standing and moving) at work and leisure among blue-collar workers. Methods: One hundred thirty-eight workers from the NOMAD cohort were included. Data from physical activity and HRV were obtained for 3–4 days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) and a heart rate monitor (Actiheart). HRV indices were determined during sitting, standing and moving both at work and leisure. Linear mixed-models with two fixed factors (activities and domains) were applied to investigate differences in HRV indices adjusting for individual and occupational factors. Results: The results showed significant effects of domain (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), physical activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and interaction between domain and activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) on HRV indices. Mean heart rate (IBI) and parasympathetic measures of HRV (RMSSD and HF) were lower for sitting (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and higher for moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) during work compared with leisure, while no difference between domains was found for standing (p CloseSPigtSPi 0.05). Sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was higher during work for sitting and moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), but showed no difference for standing (p = 0.62). Conclusions: Differences in cardiac autonomic modulation between work and leisure were found, indicating sympathetic predominance during work and parasympathetic predominance during leisure for sitting. Autonomic responses can be part of the mechanism that explains the differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on health.

AB - Purpose: The differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on cardiovascular health is termed the physical activity health paradox. Cardiac autonomic modulation could bring insights about the underlying mechanism behind this differential effect. The aim was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) during different activities (sitting, standing and moving) at work and leisure among blue-collar workers. Methods: One hundred thirty-eight workers from the NOMAD cohort were included. Data from physical activity and HRV were obtained for 3–4 days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) and a heart rate monitor (Actiheart). HRV indices were determined during sitting, standing and moving both at work and leisure. Linear mixed-models with two fixed factors (activities and domains) were applied to investigate differences in HRV indices adjusting for individual and occupational factors. Results: The results showed significant effects of domain (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), physical activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and interaction between domain and activity type (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) on HRV indices. Mean heart rate (IBI) and parasympathetic measures of HRV (RMSSD and HF) were lower for sitting (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) and higher for moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01) during work compared with leisure, while no difference between domains was found for standing (p CloseSPigtSPi 0.05). Sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was higher during work for sitting and moving (p OpenSPiltSPi 0.01), but showed no difference for standing (p = 0.62). Conclusions: Differences in cardiac autonomic modulation between work and leisure were found, indicating sympathetic predominance during work and parasympathetic predominance during leisure for sitting. Autonomic responses can be part of the mechanism that explains the differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on health.

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KW - Heart rate variability

KW - Objective measurements

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KW - Leisure Activities

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KW - Occupational Health

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Exercise/physiology

KW - Male

KW - Posture/physiology

KW - Denmark

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Aged

KW - Autonomic Nervous System/physiology

KW - Accelerometry

KW - Cohort Studies

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