Dietary Fiber Intake among Normal-Weight and Overweight Female Health Care Workers: An Exploratory Nested Case-Control Study within FINALE-Health

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Abstract

Socioeconomic factors affect choice of diet, that is, dietary fiber intake. Underreporting of food consumption in diet surveys has been reported higher in low-income, low-education groups compared to high-income, high-education groups. This paper examines in a socioeconomic homogenous low-income low-education group of females the relation between dietary fiber intake and overweight and scrutinizes if the level of underreporting is equally large in normal-weight and overweight groups. Thirty-four female health care workers classified as either normal-weight (N=18) or obese (N=16) based on BMI, fat percentage, and waist circumference participated. A detailed food-diary was used to record their dietary intake in 9 days. Average dietary fiber intake in the normal-weight group was 2.73 +/- 0.65 g/MJ, while it was 2.15 +/- 0.64 g/MJ for the women in the obese group. In both groups, the overall food intake was underreported. In spite of a significantly lower dietary fiber intake in the obese group, the present population of women working within health care all showed an overall low dietary fiber intake and a general underreporting of food intake. These results indicate a clear need for dietary advice especially on fiber intake to increase general health and decrease weight.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1096015
JournalJournal of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume2017
Number of pages7
ISSN2090-0724
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Jan 2017

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Dietary Fiber
health care workers
case-control studies
Case-Control Studies
dietary fiber
Delivery of Health Care
Weights and Measures
Health
Diet Records
food intake
income
Education
Diet Surveys
education
Working Women
employed women
dietary surveys
socioeconomic factors
higher education
food records

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@article{7c9da2fffb4a41d5bd97b3ab67b053a2,
title = "Dietary Fiber Intake among Normal-Weight and Overweight Female Health Care Workers: An Exploratory Nested Case-Control Study within FINALE-Health",
abstract = "Socioeconomic factors affect choice of diet, that is, dietary fiber intake. Underreporting of food consumption in diet surveys has been reported higher in low-income, low-education groups compared to high-income, high-education groups. This paper examines in a socioeconomic homogenous low-income low-education group of females the relation between dietary fiber intake and overweight and scrutinizes if the level of underreporting is equally large in normal-weight and overweight groups. Thirty-four female health care workers classified as either normal-weight (N=18) or obese (N=16) based on BMI, fat percentage, and waist circumference participated. A detailed food-diary was used to record their dietary intake in 9 days. Average dietary fiber intake in the normal-weight group was 2.73 +/- 0.65 g/MJ, while it was 2.15 +/- 0.64 g/MJ for the women in the obese group. In both groups, the overall food intake was underreported. In spite of a significantly lower dietary fiber intake in the obese group, the present population of women working within health care all showed an overall low dietary fiber intake and a general underreporting of food intake. These results indicate a clear need for dietary advice especially on fiber intake to increase general health and decrease weight.",
author = "Jenny Hadr{\'e}vi and Karen S{\o}gaard and Christensen, {Jeanette Reffstrup}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1155/2017/1096015",
language = "English",
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journal = "Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary Fiber Intake among Normal-Weight and Overweight Female Health Care Workers

T2 - An Exploratory Nested Case-Control Study within FINALE-Health

AU - Hadrévi, Jenny

AU - Søgaard, Karen

AU - Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Socioeconomic factors affect choice of diet, that is, dietary fiber intake. Underreporting of food consumption in diet surveys has been reported higher in low-income, low-education groups compared to high-income, high-education groups. This paper examines in a socioeconomic homogenous low-income low-education group of females the relation between dietary fiber intake and overweight and scrutinizes if the level of underreporting is equally large in normal-weight and overweight groups. Thirty-four female health care workers classified as either normal-weight (N=18) or obese (N=16) based on BMI, fat percentage, and waist circumference participated. A detailed food-diary was used to record their dietary intake in 9 days. Average dietary fiber intake in the normal-weight group was 2.73 +/- 0.65 g/MJ, while it was 2.15 +/- 0.64 g/MJ for the women in the obese group. In both groups, the overall food intake was underreported. In spite of a significantly lower dietary fiber intake in the obese group, the present population of women working within health care all showed an overall low dietary fiber intake and a general underreporting of food intake. These results indicate a clear need for dietary advice especially on fiber intake to increase general health and decrease weight.

AB - Socioeconomic factors affect choice of diet, that is, dietary fiber intake. Underreporting of food consumption in diet surveys has been reported higher in low-income, low-education groups compared to high-income, high-education groups. This paper examines in a socioeconomic homogenous low-income low-education group of females the relation between dietary fiber intake and overweight and scrutinizes if the level of underreporting is equally large in normal-weight and overweight groups. Thirty-four female health care workers classified as either normal-weight (N=18) or obese (N=16) based on BMI, fat percentage, and waist circumference participated. A detailed food-diary was used to record their dietary intake in 9 days. Average dietary fiber intake in the normal-weight group was 2.73 +/- 0.65 g/MJ, while it was 2.15 +/- 0.64 g/MJ for the women in the obese group. In both groups, the overall food intake was underreported. In spite of a significantly lower dietary fiber intake in the obese group, the present population of women working within health care all showed an overall low dietary fiber intake and a general underreporting of food intake. These results indicate a clear need for dietary advice especially on fiber intake to increase general health and decrease weight.

U2 - 10.1155/2017/1096015

DO - 10.1155/2017/1096015

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29259826

VL - 2017

JO - Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

SN - 2090-0724

M1 - 1096015

ER -