Diet has independent effects on the pace and shape of aging in Drosophila melanogaster

Catherine Ruth Archer, Ugofilippo Basellini, John Hunt, Stephen J Simpson, Kwang Pum Lee, Annette Baudisch

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Abstract

Studies examining how diet affects mortality risk over age typically characterise mortality using parameters such as aging rates, which condense how much and how quickly the risk of dying changes over time into a single measure. Demographers have suggested that decoupling the tempo and the magnitude of changing mortality risk may facilitate comparative analyses of mortality trajectories, but it is unclear what biologically meaningful information this approach offers. Here, we determine how the amount and ratio of protein and carbohydrate ingested by female Drosophila melanogaster affects how much mortality risk increases over a time-standardised life-course (the shape of aging) and the tempo at which animals live and die (the pace of aging). We find that pace values increased as flies consumed more carbohydrate but declined with increasing protein consumption. Shape values were independent of protein intake but were lowest in flies consuming ~90 μg of carbohydrate daily. As protein intake only affected the pace of aging, varying protein intake rescaled mortality trajectories (i.e. stretched or compressed survival curves), while varying carbohydrate consumption caused deviation from temporal rescaling (i.e. changed the topography of time-standardised survival curves), by affecting pace and shape. Clearly, the pace and shape of aging may vary independently in response to dietary manipulation. This suggests that there is the potential for pace and shape to evolve independently of one another and respond to different physiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for independent variation in pace and shape, may offer insight into the factors underlying diverse mortality trajectories.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBiogerontology
Volume19
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)1-12
ISSN1389-5729
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Drosophila melanogaster
Diet
Proteins
Physiological Phenomena

Keywords

  • Dietary restriction
  • Fruit flies
  • Geometric framework of nutrition
  • Gompertz
  • Pace
  • Shape
  • Dietary Proteins/analysis
  • Mortality
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Longevity/physiology
  • Aging/physiology
  • Animals
  • Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
  • Diet
  • Life Expectancy
  • Models, Biological
  • Female
  • Dietary Carbohydrates/analysis
  • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Nutritional Requirements/physiology

Cite this

Archer, Catherine Ruth ; Basellini, Ugofilippo ; Hunt, John ; Simpson, Stephen J ; Lee, Kwang Pum ; Baudisch, Annette. / Diet has independent effects on the pace and shape of aging in Drosophila melanogaster. In: Biogerontology. 2018 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 1-12.
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abstract = "Studies examining how diet affects mortality risk over age typically characterise mortality using parameters such as aging rates, which condense how much and how quickly the risk of dying changes over time into a single measure. Demographers have suggested that decoupling the tempo and the magnitude of changing mortality risk may facilitate comparative analyses of mortality trajectories, but it is unclear what biologically meaningful information this approach offers. Here, we determine how the amount and ratio of protein and carbohydrate ingested by female Drosophila melanogaster affects how much mortality risk increases over a time-standardised life-course (the shape of aging) and the tempo at which animals live and die (the pace of aging). We find that pace values increased as flies consumed more carbohydrate but declined with increasing protein consumption. Shape values were independent of protein intake but were lowest in flies consuming ~90 μg of carbohydrate daily. As protein intake only affected the pace of aging, varying protein intake rescaled mortality trajectories (i.e. stretched or compressed survival curves), while varying carbohydrate consumption caused deviation from temporal rescaling (i.e. changed the topography of time-standardised survival curves), by affecting pace and shape. Clearly, the pace and shape of aging may vary independently in response to dietary manipulation. This suggests that there is the potential for pace and shape to evolve independently of one another and respond to different physiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for independent variation in pace and shape, may offer insight into the factors underlying diverse mortality trajectories.",
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Diet has independent effects on the pace and shape of aging in Drosophila melanogaster. / Archer, Catherine Ruth; Basellini, Ugofilippo; Hunt, John ; Simpson, Stephen J; Lee, Kwang Pum; Baudisch, Annette.

In: Biogerontology, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Diet has independent effects on the pace and shape of aging in Drosophila melanogaster

AU - Archer, Catherine Ruth

AU - Basellini, Ugofilippo

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AU - Simpson, Stephen J

AU - Lee, Kwang Pum

AU - Baudisch, Annette

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AB - Studies examining how diet affects mortality risk over age typically characterise mortality using parameters such as aging rates, which condense how much and how quickly the risk of dying changes over time into a single measure. Demographers have suggested that decoupling the tempo and the magnitude of changing mortality risk may facilitate comparative analyses of mortality trajectories, but it is unclear what biologically meaningful information this approach offers. Here, we determine how the amount and ratio of protein and carbohydrate ingested by female Drosophila melanogaster affects how much mortality risk increases over a time-standardised life-course (the shape of aging) and the tempo at which animals live and die (the pace of aging). We find that pace values increased as flies consumed more carbohydrate but declined with increasing protein consumption. Shape values were independent of protein intake but were lowest in flies consuming ~90 μg of carbohydrate daily. As protein intake only affected the pace of aging, varying protein intake rescaled mortality trajectories (i.e. stretched or compressed survival curves), while varying carbohydrate consumption caused deviation from temporal rescaling (i.e. changed the topography of time-standardised survival curves), by affecting pace and shape. Clearly, the pace and shape of aging may vary independently in response to dietary manipulation. This suggests that there is the potential for pace and shape to evolve independently of one another and respond to different physiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for independent variation in pace and shape, may offer insight into the factors underlying diverse mortality trajectories.

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