Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

Vibeke Andersen, Anja Olsen, Franck Carbonnel, Anne Tjønneland, Ulla Birgitte Vogel

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the environmental factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease should help to prevent occurrence of the disease and its relapses. AIM: To review current knowledge on dietary risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: The PubMed, Medline and Cochrane Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. RESULTS: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case-control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may be protective. No effect was found of intake of dietary fibres, sugar, macronutrients, total energy, vitamin C, D, E, Carotene, or Retinol (vitamin A) on risk of ulcerative colitis. No prospective data was found on risk related to intake of fruits, vegetables or food microparticles (titanium dioxide and aluminium silicate). CONCLUSIONS: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDigestive and Liver Disease
Volume44
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)185-194
ISSN1590-8658
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Diet
Ulcerative Colitis
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Omega-6 Fatty Acids
Dietary Sucrose
Dietary Fiber
Linoleic Acid
PubMed
Vegetables
Meat
Libraries
Case-Control Studies
Counseling
Fruit
Proteins
Smoking
Prospective Studies
Food

Cite this

Andersen, V., Olsen, A., Carbonnel, F., Tjønneland, A., & Vogel, U. B. (2012). Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Digestive and Liver Disease, 44(3), 185-194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2011.10.001
Andersen, Vibeke ; Olsen, Anja ; Carbonnel, Franck ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte. / Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. In: Digestive and Liver Disease. 2012 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 185-194.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the environmental factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease should help to prevent occurrence of the disease and its relapses. AIM: To review current knowledge on dietary risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: The PubMed, Medline and Cochrane Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. RESULTS: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case-control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may be protective. No effect was found of intake of dietary fibres, sugar, macronutrients, total energy, vitamin C, D, E, Carotene, or Retinol (vitamin A) on risk of ulcerative colitis. No prospective data was found on risk related to intake of fruits, vegetables or food microparticles (titanium dioxide and aluminium silicate). CONCLUSIONS: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects.",
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Andersen, V, Olsen, A, Carbonnel, F, Tjønneland, A & Vogel, UB 2012, 'Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease' Digestive and Liver Disease, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 185-194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dld.2011.10.001

Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. / Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck; Tjønneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte.

In: Digestive and Liver Disease, Vol. 44, No. 3, 2012, p. 185-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

AU - Andersen, Vibeke

AU - Olsen, Anja

AU - Carbonnel, Franck

AU - Tjønneland, Anne

AU - Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

N1 - Inpress jan 2012

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the environmental factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease should help to prevent occurrence of the disease and its relapses. AIM: To review current knowledge on dietary risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: The PubMed, Medline and Cochrane Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. RESULTS: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case-control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may be protective. No effect was found of intake of dietary fibres, sugar, macronutrients, total energy, vitamin C, D, E, Carotene, or Retinol (vitamin A) on risk of ulcerative colitis. No prospective data was found on risk related to intake of fruits, vegetables or food microparticles (titanium dioxide and aluminium silicate). CONCLUSIONS: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects.

AB - BACKGROUND: A better understanding of the environmental factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease should help to prevent occurrence of the disease and its relapses. AIM: To review current knowledge on dietary risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: The PubMed, Medline and Cochrane Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. RESULTS: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case-control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may be protective. No effect was found of intake of dietary fibres, sugar, macronutrients, total energy, vitamin C, D, E, Carotene, or Retinol (vitamin A) on risk of ulcerative colitis. No prospective data was found on risk related to intake of fruits, vegetables or food microparticles (titanium dioxide and aluminium silicate). CONCLUSIONS: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects.

U2 - 10.1016/j.dld.2011.10.001

DO - 10.1016/j.dld.2011.10.001

M3 - Journal article

VL - 44

SP - 185

EP - 194

JO - Digestive and Liver Disease

JF - Digestive and Liver Disease

SN - 1590-8658

IS - 3

ER -