Developing and evaluating a course programme to enhance existential communication with cancer patients in general practice

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

91 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: Our objective was to describe the development and evaluation of a course programme in existential communication targeting general practitioners (GPs). Design: The UK Medical Research Council’s (MRC) framework for complex intervention research was used as a guide for course development and evaluation and was furthermore used to structure this paper. The development phase included: identification of existing evidence, description of the theoretical framework of the course, designing the intervention and deciding for types of evaluation. In the evaluation phase we measured self-efficacy before and after course participation. To explore further processes of change we conducted individual, semi-structured telephone interviews with participants. Subjects and setting: Twenty practising GPs and residentials in training to become GPs from one Danish region (mean age 49). Results: The development phase resulted in a one-day vocational training/continuing medical education (VT/CME) course including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training. Twenty GPs participated in the testing of the course, nineteen GPs answered questionnaires measuring self-efficacy, and fifteen GPs were interviewed. The mean scores of self-efficacy increased significantly. The qualitative results pointed to positive post course changes such as an increase in the participants’ existential self-awareness, an increase in awareness of patients in need of existential communication, and an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. Conclusions: A one-day VT/CME course targeting GPs and including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training showed to make participants more confident about their ability to communicate with patients about existential issues and concerns.Key points Patients with cancer often desire to discuss existential concerns as part of clinical care but general practitioners (GPs) lack confidence when discussing existential issues in daily practice. In order to lessen barriers and enhance existential communication in general practice, we developed a one-day course programme. Attending the course resulted in an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. This study adds knowledge to how confidence in existential communication can be increased among GPs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
Volume36
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)142-151
ISSN0281-3432
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

General Practice
General Practitioners
Communication
Neoplasms
Self Efficacy
Vocational Education
Continuing Medical Education
Biomedical Research
Interviews
Research

Keywords

  • Communication
  • cancer
  • continuing medical education
  • existential
  • general practitioners
  • religious
  • spiritual
  • vocational training
  • Spirituality
  • Self Efficacy
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • General Practice
  • Adult
  • Female
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Patient Care/psychology
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Internship and Residency
  • Professional Competence
  • Physician-Patient Relations
  • Emotions
  • General Practitioners/education
  • Neoplasms/psychology
  • Program Evaluation
  • Existentialism

Cite this

@article{0d0f7c1fc30642c3a7e7014ebd4ffa1d,
title = "Developing and evaluating a course programme to enhance existential communication with cancer patients in general practice",
abstract = "Objective: Our objective was to describe the development and evaluation of a course programme in existential communication targeting general practitioners (GPs). Design: The UK Medical Research Council’s (MRC) framework for complex intervention research was used as a guide for course development and evaluation and was furthermore used to structure this paper. The development phase included: identification of existing evidence, description of the theoretical framework of the course, designing the intervention and deciding for types of evaluation. In the evaluation phase we measured self-efficacy before and after course participation. To explore further processes of change we conducted individual, semi-structured telephone interviews with participants. Subjects and setting: Twenty practising GPs and residentials in training to become GPs from one Danish region (mean age 49). Results: The development phase resulted in a one-day vocational training/continuing medical education (VT/CME) course including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training. Twenty GPs participated in the testing of the course, nineteen GPs answered questionnaires measuring self-efficacy, and fifteen GPs were interviewed. The mean scores of self-efficacy increased significantly. The qualitative results pointed to positive post course changes such as an increase in the participants’ existential self-awareness, an increase in awareness of patients in need of existential communication, and an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. Conclusions: A one-day VT/CME course targeting GPs and including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training showed to make participants more confident about their ability to communicate with patients about existential issues and concerns.Key points Patients with cancer often desire to discuss existential concerns as part of clinical care but general practitioners (GPs) lack confidence when discussing existential issues in daily practice. In order to lessen barriers and enhance existential communication in general practice, we developed a one-day course programme. Attending the course resulted in an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. This study adds knowledge to how confidence in existential communication can be increased among GPs.",
keywords = "Communication, cancer, continuing medical education, existential, general practitioners, religious, spiritual, vocational training, Spirituality, Self Efficacy, Humans, Middle Aged, Male, General Practice, Adult, Female, Surveys and Questionnaires, Patient Care/psychology, Attitude of Health Personnel, Internship and Residency, Professional Competence, Physician-Patient Relations, Emotions, General Practitioners/education, Neoplasms/psychology, Program Evaluation, Existentialism",
author = "{Assing Hvidt}, Elisabeth and Jette Ammentorp and Jens S{\o}ndergaard and Connie Timmermann and Hansen, {Dorte Gils{\aa}} and Hvidt, {Niels Christian}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/02813432.2018.1459235",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "142--151",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care",
issn = "0281-3432",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developing and evaluating a course programme to enhance existential communication with cancer patients in general practice

AU - Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth

AU - Ammentorp, Jette

AU - Søndergaard, Jens

AU - Timmermann, Connie

AU - Hansen, Dorte Gilså

AU - Hvidt, Niels Christian

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Objective: Our objective was to describe the development and evaluation of a course programme in existential communication targeting general practitioners (GPs). Design: The UK Medical Research Council’s (MRC) framework for complex intervention research was used as a guide for course development and evaluation and was furthermore used to structure this paper. The development phase included: identification of existing evidence, description of the theoretical framework of the course, designing the intervention and deciding for types of evaluation. In the evaluation phase we measured self-efficacy before and after course participation. To explore further processes of change we conducted individual, semi-structured telephone interviews with participants. Subjects and setting: Twenty practising GPs and residentials in training to become GPs from one Danish region (mean age 49). Results: The development phase resulted in a one-day vocational training/continuing medical education (VT/CME) course including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training. Twenty GPs participated in the testing of the course, nineteen GPs answered questionnaires measuring self-efficacy, and fifteen GPs were interviewed. The mean scores of self-efficacy increased significantly. The qualitative results pointed to positive post course changes such as an increase in the participants’ existential self-awareness, an increase in awareness of patients in need of existential communication, and an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. Conclusions: A one-day VT/CME course targeting GPs and including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training showed to make participants more confident about their ability to communicate with patients about existential issues and concerns.Key points Patients with cancer often desire to discuss existential concerns as part of clinical care but general practitioners (GPs) lack confidence when discussing existential issues in daily practice. In order to lessen barriers and enhance existential communication in general practice, we developed a one-day course programme. Attending the course resulted in an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. This study adds knowledge to how confidence in existential communication can be increased among GPs.

AB - Objective: Our objective was to describe the development and evaluation of a course programme in existential communication targeting general practitioners (GPs). Design: The UK Medical Research Council’s (MRC) framework for complex intervention research was used as a guide for course development and evaluation and was furthermore used to structure this paper. The development phase included: identification of existing evidence, description of the theoretical framework of the course, designing the intervention and deciding for types of evaluation. In the evaluation phase we measured self-efficacy before and after course participation. To explore further processes of change we conducted individual, semi-structured telephone interviews with participants. Subjects and setting: Twenty practising GPs and residentials in training to become GPs from one Danish region (mean age 49). Results: The development phase resulted in a one-day vocational training/continuing medical education (VT/CME) course including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training. Twenty GPs participated in the testing of the course, nineteen GPs answered questionnaires measuring self-efficacy, and fifteen GPs were interviewed. The mean scores of self-efficacy increased significantly. The qualitative results pointed to positive post course changes such as an increase in the participants’ existential self-awareness, an increase in awareness of patients in need of existential communication, and an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. Conclusions: A one-day VT/CME course targeting GPs and including the main elements of knowledge building, self-reflection and communication training showed to make participants more confident about their ability to communicate with patients about existential issues and concerns.Key points Patients with cancer often desire to discuss existential concerns as part of clinical care but general practitioners (GPs) lack confidence when discussing existential issues in daily practice. In order to lessen barriers and enhance existential communication in general practice, we developed a one-day course programme. Attending the course resulted in an increase in the participants’ confidence in the ability to carry out existential communication. This study adds knowledge to how confidence in existential communication can be increased among GPs.

KW - Communication

KW - cancer

KW - continuing medical education

KW - existential

KW - general practitioners

KW - religious

KW - spiritual

KW - vocational training

KW - Spirituality

KW - Self Efficacy

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Male

KW - General Practice

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Patient Care/psychology

KW - Attitude of Health Personnel

KW - Internship and Residency

KW - Professional Competence

KW - Physician-Patient Relations

KW - Emotions

KW - General Practitioners/education

KW - Neoplasms/psychology

KW - Program Evaluation

KW - Existentialism

U2 - 10.1080/02813432.2018.1459235

DO - 10.1080/02813432.2018.1459235

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 142

EP - 151

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care

SN - 0281-3432

IS - 2

ER -