Design in educational research - clarifying conceptions and presuppositions

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Abstract

The term ‘design’ is used widely – and diversely – across the field of educational research, in varying constellations with educational terms, and both as a verb and as a noun. To give but a few examples, the following are commonly found in the Anglo-American literature:

Pedagogical design (Conole, 2013; Laurillard, 2012)

Learning design (Conole, 2013, used as a noun, Mor et al., 2014, used as a verb)

Design for learning (Carvalho and Goodyear, 2014)

Educational design (Goodyear, 2005)

Instructional design (Gagné et al., 2005).

In Scandinavia, the term didaktisk design is prevalent (Gynther, 2010; Selander and Svärdemo-Åberg, 2008; Levinsen and Sørensen, 2011; Hansen, 2012; Dohn, 2011a; Dohn and Hansen, 2016), though the Scandinavian equivalent of the Anglo-American terms are used as well (Selander and Kress, 2010; Jensen, 2002). Didaktisk design takes as its outset the German concept of Didaktik which, to complicate matters, has a rather different meaning than the English didactics: The English didactics denotes instructional methods, narrowly construed as concerned with the efficient delivery of information. In contrast, the German and Scandinavian Didaktik denotes the broad field of teaching and learning, both theoretically and practically, with a significant focus on Bildung, i.e. on the formation of the person. However, the apparent extensive agreement within Scandinavia on which term to use conceals a diversity quite as large as the one within the Anglo-American literature, as to the precise reference of ‘design’ as well as to this reference’s status as process or entity.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDesigning for Learning in a Networked World
EditorsNina Bonderup Dohn
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Publication date2018
Pages25-47
Chapter2
ISBN (Print)978-0-8153-7843-3
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-351-23235-7
Publication statusPublished - 2018
SeriesRoutledge Research in Education

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educational research
Scandinavia
didactics
learning
human being
Teaching
literature

Cite this

Dohn, N. B., & Hansen, J. J. (2018). Design in educational research - clarifying conceptions and presuppositions. In N. B. Dohn (Ed.), Designing for Learning in a Networked World (pp. 25-47). London: Routledge. Routledge Research in Education
Dohn, Nina Bonderup ; Hansen, Jens Jørgen. / Design in educational research - clarifying conceptions and presuppositions. Designing for Learning in a Networked World. editor / Nina Bonderup Dohn. London : Routledge, 2018. pp. 25-47 (Routledge Research in Education).
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Dohn, NB & Hansen, JJ 2018, Design in educational research - clarifying conceptions and presuppositions. in NB Dohn (ed.), Designing for Learning in a Networked World. Routledge, London, Routledge Research in Education, pp. 25-47.

Design in educational research - clarifying conceptions and presuppositions. / Dohn, Nina Bonderup; Hansen, Jens Jørgen.

Designing for Learning in a Networked World. ed. / Nina Bonderup Dohn. London : Routledge, 2018. p. 25-47 (Routledge Research in Education).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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N2 - The term ‘design’ is used widely – and diversely – across the field of educational research, in varying constellations with educational terms, and both as a verb and as a noun. To give but a few examples, the following are commonly found in the Anglo-American literature:Pedagogical design (Conole, 2013; Laurillard, 2012)Learning design (Conole, 2013, used as a noun, Mor et al., 2014, used as a verb)Design for learning (Carvalho and Goodyear, 2014)Educational design (Goodyear, 2005)Instructional design (Gagné et al., 2005).In Scandinavia, the term didaktisk design is prevalent (Gynther, 2010; Selander and Svärdemo-Åberg, 2008; Levinsen and Sørensen, 2011; Hansen, 2012; Dohn, 2011a; Dohn and Hansen, 2016), though the Scandinavian equivalent of the Anglo-American terms are used as well (Selander and Kress, 2010; Jensen, 2002). Didaktisk design takes as its outset the German concept of Didaktik which, to complicate matters, has a rather different meaning than the English didactics: The English didactics denotes instructional methods, narrowly construed as concerned with the efficient delivery of information. In contrast, the German and Scandinavian Didaktik denotes the broad field of teaching and learning, both theoretically and practically, with a significant focus on Bildung, i.e. on the formation of the person. However, the apparent extensive agreement within Scandinavia on which term to use conceals a diversity quite as large as the one within the Anglo-American literature, as to the precise reference of ‘design’ as well as to this reference’s status as process or entity.

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Dohn NB, Hansen JJ. Design in educational research - clarifying conceptions and presuppositions. In Dohn NB, editor, Designing for Learning in a Networked World. London: Routledge. 2018. p. 25-47. (Routledge Research in Education).