Demographics of antibiotic persistence

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

Abstract

Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due to reduced metabolic activity. Persister cells and non-persister cells do not differ substantially in their division rate and there is mixed evidence about reduction in growth under certain conditions. In any case costs for persistence are much lower than previously assumed and suggest that persistence might even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2016
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventEvolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016 - University of Virginia, Charlottesville VA, United States
Duration: 2. Oct 20165. Oct 2016
http://evodemo2016.weebly.com/

Conference

ConferenceEvolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016
LocationUniversity of Virginia
CountryUnited States
CityCharlottesville VA
Period02/10/201605/10/2016
Internet address

Fingerprint

Microbial Drug Resistance
Batch Cell Culture Techniques
Growth
Treatment Failure

Cite this

Kollerova, S., Jouvet, L., & Steiner, U. (2016). Demographics of antibiotic persistence. Abstract from Evolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016, Charlottesville VA, United States.
Kollerova, Silvia ; Jouvet, Lionel ; Steiner, Ulrich. / Demographics of antibiotic persistence. Abstract from Evolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016, Charlottesville VA, United States.
@conference{7dfd6582733445ae9f8e45604d328384,
title = "Demographics of antibiotic persistence",
abstract = "Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due to reduced metabolic activity. Persister cells and non-persister cells do not differ substantially in their division rate and there is mixed evidence about reduction in growth under certain conditions. In any case costs for persistence are much lower than previously assumed and suggest that persistence might even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed.",
author = "Silvia Kollerova and Lionel Jouvet and Ulrich Steiner",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
note = "Evolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016 ; Conference date: 02-10-2016 Through 05-10-2016",
url = "http://evodemo2016.weebly.com/",

}

Kollerova, S, Jouvet, L & Steiner, U 2016, 'Demographics of antibiotic persistence' Evolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016, Charlottesville VA, United States, 02/10/2016 - 05/10/2016, .

Demographics of antibiotic persistence. / Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich.

2016. Abstract from Evolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016, Charlottesville VA, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conference without publisher/journalConference abstract for conferenceResearch

TY - ABST

T1 - Demographics of antibiotic persistence

AU - Kollerova, Silvia

AU - Jouvet, Lionel

AU - Steiner, Ulrich

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due to reduced metabolic activity. Persister cells and non-persister cells do not differ substantially in their division rate and there is mixed evidence about reduction in growth under certain conditions. In any case costs for persistence are much lower than previously assumed and suggest that persistence might even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed.

AB - Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due to reduced metabolic activity. Persister cells and non-persister cells do not differ substantially in their division rate and there is mixed evidence about reduction in growth under certain conditions. In any case costs for persistence are much lower than previously assumed and suggest that persistence might even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Kollerova S, Jouvet L, Steiner U. Demographics of antibiotic persistence. 2016. Abstract from Evolutionary Demography Society Meeting 2016, Charlottesville VA, United States.