Delayed Effect of Blood-Flow-Restricted Resistance Training on Rapid Force Capacity

Jakob Lindberg Nielsen, Ulrik Frandsen, Tatyana Prokhorova, Rune Dueholm Bech, Tobias Nygaard, Charlotte Suetta, Per Aagaard

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)).

METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets of knee extensor exercise (20%1RM) to concentric failure during concurrent BFR of the thigh (100mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 years) trained without BFR (CON). Twenty-three training sessions were performed within 19 days. Maximal slow and fast knee joint velocity muscle strength and rapid force capacity (e.g. RTD) as well as evoked twitch contractile parameters was assessed before (Pre) and 5 and 12 days after training (Post5, Post12). Muscle biopsies were obtained Pre, after 8 days (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days post training (Post3, Post10) to examine changes in myofiber area and expression of myocellular proteins known to be modified by cellular stress (CaMKII,Annexin-A6,SNO-CYS).

RESULTS: RTD remained unchanged following BFR training at Post5, while increasing 15-20% Post12 (P<0.01). Evoked muscle twitch parameters showed a general decline Post5 (P<0.01), while returning to baseline levels at Post12. All contractile parameters essentially remained unchanged in CON. Elevated CaMKII was observed with BFR training at Post3 (57%) and Post10 (71%) (P<0.05), while SNO-CYS increased in CON at Mid8 (P<0.05).

CONCLUSION: This study is the first to show that low-load resistance exercise performed with blood-flow restriction leads to marked increases in rapid force capacity (RTD). However, a general delayed adaptive response was observed for voluntary contractile parameters (including RTD) in parallel with a decline and subsequent recovery in evoked contractile properties, suggesting the delayed gain in rapid force capacity mainly have a peripheral origin.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume49
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)1157-1167
ISSN0195-9131
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Resistance Training
Torque
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Annexin A6
Muscles
Knee Joint
Knee
Proteins

Keywords

  • Contractile Properties
  • Ischemic Exercise
  • Kaatsu
  • Muscle Hypertrophy
  • Myocellular Ca2+ Exposure
  • Nitrosylation Of Muscle Proteins
  • Muscle Proteins/metabolism
  • Humans
  • Muscle Strength/physiology
  • Muscle, Skeletal/blood supply
  • Male
  • Thigh/blood supply
  • Regional Blood Flow/physiology
  • Young Adult
  • Resistance Training/methods
  • Muscle Contraction/physiology
  • Pain Perception/physiology

Cite this

Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg ; Frandsen, Ulrik ; Prokhorova, Tatyana ; Bech, Rune Dueholm ; Nygaard, Tobias ; Suetta, Charlotte ; Aagaard, Per. / Delayed Effect of Blood-Flow-Restricted Resistance Training on Rapid Force Capacity. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2017 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 1157-1167.
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title = "Delayed Effect of Blood-Flow-Restricted Resistance Training on Rapid Force Capacity",
abstract = "PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)).METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets of knee extensor exercise (20{\%}1RM) to concentric failure during concurrent BFR of the thigh (100mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 years) trained without BFR (CON). Twenty-three training sessions were performed within 19 days. Maximal slow and fast knee joint velocity muscle strength and rapid force capacity (e.g. RTD) as well as evoked twitch contractile parameters was assessed before (Pre) and 5 and 12 days after training (Post5, Post12). Muscle biopsies were obtained Pre, after 8 days (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days post training (Post3, Post10) to examine changes in myofiber area and expression of myocellular proteins known to be modified by cellular stress (CaMKII,Annexin-A6,SNO-CYS).RESULTS: RTD remained unchanged following BFR training at Post5, while increasing 15-20{\%} Post12 (P<0.01). Evoked muscle twitch parameters showed a general decline Post5 (P<0.01), while returning to baseline levels at Post12. All contractile parameters essentially remained unchanged in CON. Elevated CaMKII was observed with BFR training at Post3 (57{\%}) and Post10 (71{\%}) (P<0.05), while SNO-CYS increased in CON at Mid8 (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: This study is the first to show that low-load resistance exercise performed with blood-flow restriction leads to marked increases in rapid force capacity (RTD). However, a general delayed adaptive response was observed for voluntary contractile parameters (including RTD) in parallel with a decline and subsequent recovery in evoked contractile properties, suggesting the delayed gain in rapid force capacity mainly have a peripheral origin.",
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author = "Nielsen, {Jakob Lindberg} and Ulrik Frandsen and Tatyana Prokhorova and Bech, {Rune Dueholm} and Tobias Nygaard and Charlotte Suetta and Per Aagaard",
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Delayed Effect of Blood-Flow-Restricted Resistance Training on Rapid Force Capacity. / Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg; Frandsen, Ulrik; Prokhorova, Tatyana; Bech, Rune Dueholm; Nygaard, Tobias; Suetta, Charlotte; Aagaard, Per.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 49, No. 6, 2017, p. 1157-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Delayed Effect of Blood-Flow-Restricted Resistance Training on Rapid Force Capacity

AU - Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg

AU - Frandsen, Ulrik

AU - Prokhorova, Tatyana

AU - Bech, Rune Dueholm

AU - Nygaard, Tobias

AU - Suetta, Charlotte

AU - Aagaard, Per

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)).METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets of knee extensor exercise (20%1RM) to concentric failure during concurrent BFR of the thigh (100mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 years) trained without BFR (CON). Twenty-three training sessions were performed within 19 days. Maximal slow and fast knee joint velocity muscle strength and rapid force capacity (e.g. RTD) as well as evoked twitch contractile parameters was assessed before (Pre) and 5 and 12 days after training (Post5, Post12). Muscle biopsies were obtained Pre, after 8 days (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days post training (Post3, Post10) to examine changes in myofiber area and expression of myocellular proteins known to be modified by cellular stress (CaMKII,Annexin-A6,SNO-CYS).RESULTS: RTD remained unchanged following BFR training at Post5, while increasing 15-20% Post12 (P<0.01). Evoked muscle twitch parameters showed a general decline Post5 (P<0.01), while returning to baseline levels at Post12. All contractile parameters essentially remained unchanged in CON. Elevated CaMKII was observed with BFR training at Post3 (57%) and Post10 (71%) (P<0.05), while SNO-CYS increased in CON at Mid8 (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: This study is the first to show that low-load resistance exercise performed with blood-flow restriction leads to marked increases in rapid force capacity (RTD). However, a general delayed adaptive response was observed for voluntary contractile parameters (including RTD) in parallel with a decline and subsequent recovery in evoked contractile properties, suggesting the delayed gain in rapid force capacity mainly have a peripheral origin.

AB - PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)).METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets of knee extensor exercise (20%1RM) to concentric failure during concurrent BFR of the thigh (100mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 years) trained without BFR (CON). Twenty-three training sessions were performed within 19 days. Maximal slow and fast knee joint velocity muscle strength and rapid force capacity (e.g. RTD) as well as evoked twitch contractile parameters was assessed before (Pre) and 5 and 12 days after training (Post5, Post12). Muscle biopsies were obtained Pre, after 8 days (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days post training (Post3, Post10) to examine changes in myofiber area and expression of myocellular proteins known to be modified by cellular stress (CaMKII,Annexin-A6,SNO-CYS).RESULTS: RTD remained unchanged following BFR training at Post5, while increasing 15-20% Post12 (P<0.01). Evoked muscle twitch parameters showed a general decline Post5 (P<0.01), while returning to baseline levels at Post12. All contractile parameters essentially remained unchanged in CON. Elevated CaMKII was observed with BFR training at Post3 (57%) and Post10 (71%) (P<0.05), while SNO-CYS increased in CON at Mid8 (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: This study is the first to show that low-load resistance exercise performed with blood-flow restriction leads to marked increases in rapid force capacity (RTD). However, a general delayed adaptive response was observed for voluntary contractile parameters (including RTD) in parallel with a decline and subsequent recovery in evoked contractile properties, suggesting the delayed gain in rapid force capacity mainly have a peripheral origin.

KW - Contractile Properties

KW - Ischemic Exercise

KW - Kaatsu

KW - Muscle Hypertrophy

KW - Myocellular Ca2+ Exposure

KW - Nitrosylation Of Muscle Proteins

KW - Muscle Proteins/metabolism

KW - Humans

KW - Muscle Strength/physiology

KW - Muscle, Skeletal/blood supply

KW - Male

KW - Thigh/blood supply

KW - Regional Blood Flow/physiology

KW - Young Adult

KW - Resistance Training/methods

KW - Muscle Contraction/physiology

KW - Pain Perception/physiology

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001208

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001208

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28121802

VL - 49

SP - 1157

EP - 1167

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 6

ER -