Current Approaches and Future Trends in Compost Quality Criteria for Agronomic, Environmental, and Human Health Benefits

Maria Pilar Bernal, Sven G. Sommer, Dave Chadwick, Chen Qing, Li Guoxue, Frederick C. Michel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Organic wastes are composted to stabilize organic matter, reduce the moisture content, increase the concentrations of plant nutrients, eliminate pathogens and weed seeds, develop disease suppressiveness, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The requirements for compost quality depend on its final destination, which includes agriculture, horticulture, and urban landscaping. The development of a market for compost greatly depends on the definition and adoption of quality standards. Several countries and public and private organizations have established quality standards for compost, where certain properties are prioritized and different limits are established according to the end use. However, there is a need to harmonize such criteria at the international level. Also, if the process of composting is not managed properly, then it can result in excessive emissions of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4). This review compares compost quality criteria across different countries, addresses strategies for reducing the environmental impacts of composting processes, and evaluates new analytical and microbiological approaches to define compost quality. An overview of compost quality standards in Europe, China, and the United States of America is given, including a characterization of the plant residues, livestock manure, and organic wastes that can be composted.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Agronomy
EditorsDonald L. Sparks
Volume144
PublisherAcademic Press
Publication date2017
Pages143-233
Chapter3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
SeriesAdvances in Agronomy
Volume144
ISSN0065-2113

Fingerprint

compost
composting
horticulture
plant residue
nitrous oxide
weed
trend
human health
environmental health
livestock
manure
moisture content
greenhouse gas
environmental impact
ammonia
pathogen
methane
agriculture
seed
organic matter

Keywords

  • Compost maturity
  • Compost uses
  • Greenhouse gas emissions
  • Microbial community
  • Mineralization
  • Organic contaminants
  • Organic matter characterization
  • Organic wastes
  • Pathogens

Cite this

Bernal, M. P., Sommer, S. G., Chadwick, D., Qing, C., Guoxue, L., & Michel, F. C. (2017). Current Approaches and Future Trends in Compost Quality Criteria for Agronomic, Environmental, and Human Health Benefits. In D. L. Sparks (Ed.), Advances in Agronomy (Vol. 144, pp. 143-233). Academic Press. Advances in Agronomy, Vol.. 144 https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.agron.2017.03.002
Bernal, Maria Pilar ; Sommer, Sven G. ; Chadwick, Dave ; Qing, Chen ; Guoxue, Li ; Michel, Frederick C. / Current Approaches and Future Trends in Compost Quality Criteria for Agronomic, Environmental, and Human Health Benefits. Advances in Agronomy. editor / Donald L. Sparks. Vol. 144 Academic Press, 2017. pp. 143-233 (Advances in Agronomy, Vol. 144).
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abstract = "Organic wastes are composted to stabilize organic matter, reduce the moisture content, increase the concentrations of plant nutrients, eliminate pathogens and weed seeds, develop disease suppressiveness, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The requirements for compost quality depend on its final destination, which includes agriculture, horticulture, and urban landscaping. The development of a market for compost greatly depends on the definition and adoption of quality standards. Several countries and public and private organizations have established quality standards for compost, where certain properties are prioritized and different limits are established according to the end use. However, there is a need to harmonize such criteria at the international level. Also, if the process of composting is not managed properly, then it can result in excessive emissions of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4). This review compares compost quality criteria across different countries, addresses strategies for reducing the environmental impacts of composting processes, and evaluates new analytical and microbiological approaches to define compost quality. An overview of compost quality standards in Europe, China, and the United States of America is given, including a characterization of the plant residues, livestock manure, and organic wastes that can be composted.",
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Bernal, MP, Sommer, SG, Chadwick, D, Qing, C, Guoxue, L & Michel, FC 2017, Current Approaches and Future Trends in Compost Quality Criteria for Agronomic, Environmental, and Human Health Benefits. in DL Sparks (ed.), Advances in Agronomy. vol. 144, Academic Press, Advances in Agronomy, vol. 144, pp. 143-233. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.agron.2017.03.002

Current Approaches and Future Trends in Compost Quality Criteria for Agronomic, Environmental, and Human Health Benefits. / Bernal, Maria Pilar; Sommer, Sven G.; Chadwick, Dave; Qing, Chen; Guoxue, Li; Michel, Frederick C.

Advances in Agronomy. ed. / Donald L. Sparks. Vol. 144 Academic Press, 2017. p. 143-233 (Advances in Agronomy, Vol. 144).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Current Approaches and Future Trends in Compost Quality Criteria for Agronomic, Environmental, and Human Health Benefits

AU - Bernal, Maria Pilar

AU - Sommer, Sven G.

AU - Chadwick, Dave

AU - Qing, Chen

AU - Guoxue, Li

AU - Michel, Frederick C.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Organic wastes are composted to stabilize organic matter, reduce the moisture content, increase the concentrations of plant nutrients, eliminate pathogens and weed seeds, develop disease suppressiveness, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The requirements for compost quality depend on its final destination, which includes agriculture, horticulture, and urban landscaping. The development of a market for compost greatly depends on the definition and adoption of quality standards. Several countries and public and private organizations have established quality standards for compost, where certain properties are prioritized and different limits are established according to the end use. However, there is a need to harmonize such criteria at the international level. Also, if the process of composting is not managed properly, then it can result in excessive emissions of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4). This review compares compost quality criteria across different countries, addresses strategies for reducing the environmental impacts of composting processes, and evaluates new analytical and microbiological approaches to define compost quality. An overview of compost quality standards in Europe, China, and the United States of America is given, including a characterization of the plant residues, livestock manure, and organic wastes that can be composted.

AB - Organic wastes are composted to stabilize organic matter, reduce the moisture content, increase the concentrations of plant nutrients, eliminate pathogens and weed seeds, develop disease suppressiveness, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The requirements for compost quality depend on its final destination, which includes agriculture, horticulture, and urban landscaping. The development of a market for compost greatly depends on the definition and adoption of quality standards. Several countries and public and private organizations have established quality standards for compost, where certain properties are prioritized and different limits are established according to the end use. However, there is a need to harmonize such criteria at the international level. Also, if the process of composting is not managed properly, then it can result in excessive emissions of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4). This review compares compost quality criteria across different countries, addresses strategies for reducing the environmental impacts of composting processes, and evaluates new analytical and microbiological approaches to define compost quality. An overview of compost quality standards in Europe, China, and the United States of America is given, including a characterization of the plant residues, livestock manure, and organic wastes that can be composted.

KW - Compost maturity

KW - Compost uses

KW - Greenhouse gas emissions

KW - Microbial community

KW - Mineralization

KW - Organic contaminants

KW - Organic matter characterization

KW - Organic wastes

KW - Pathogens

U2 - 10.1016/bs.agron.2017.03.002

DO - 10.1016/bs.agron.2017.03.002

M3 - Book chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85018285806

VL - 144

T3 - Advances in Agronomy

SP - 143

EP - 233

BT - Advances in Agronomy

A2 - Sparks, Donald L.

PB - Academic Press

ER -

Bernal MP, Sommer SG, Chadwick D, Qing C, Guoxue L, Michel FC. Current Approaches and Future Trends in Compost Quality Criteria for Agronomic, Environmental, and Human Health Benefits. In Sparks DL, editor, Advances in Agronomy. Vol. 144. Academic Press. 2017. p. 143-233. (Advances in Agronomy, Vol. 144). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.agron.2017.03.002