Counternarratives

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Abstract

Broadly speaking, the term “counternarrative” refers to a narrative that takes on meaning
through its relation with one or more other narratives. While this relation is not
necessarily oppositional, it involves a stance toward some other narrative(s), and it is
this aspect of stance, or position, that distinguishes counternarrative from other forms
of intertextuality. As Bamberg and Andrews (2004) explained, “counter-narratives only
make sense in relation to something else, that which they are countering.The very name
identifies it as a positional category, in tension with another category” (p. X). Thus,
researchers work to understand the concept and its occurrence and strategic use in organizations
as a tool for understanding differing interpretations of organizational reality,
including how members position themselves narratively, how tension can be made
salient, and how resistance to change may become a resource rather than an obstacle.
Translated title of the contributionModhistorier
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe International Encyclopedia of Strategic Communication
EditorsRobert L. Heath, Winni Johansen
Number of pages11
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Publication date1. Aug 2018
ISBN (Print)978-1-119-01071-5
ISBN (Electronic)9781119010722
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1. Aug 2018

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